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My solution to the Parthenon marbles row: a museum for the 21st century33h My solution to the Parthenon marbles row: a museum for the 21st century
A travelling global exhibition of the world’s treasures would help combat rising populism, says the former US ambassador to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations As the era of Brexit arrives, Britain’s future is filled with uncertainties. Its leaders and people will need to shape a new national narrative following the country’s exit from the European Union. One way to do so would be to resolve its
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National Theatre boss denies being part of ‘left-of-centre elite’ 19 Feb 10:52am National Theatre boss denies being part of ‘left-of-centre elite’
Rufus Norris rebuffs Downton creator Julian Fellowes’ claim that NT is in a cultural bubble
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How Colum McCann Shaped Loss Into a Book 17 Feb 8:14am Updated How Colum McCann Shaped Loss Into a Book
“Apeirogon,” the latest novel from the National Book Award winner, delves into the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through the eyes of two grieving fathers.
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13 Feb 12:47pm In Trippy Times, Bill Graham Took Care of Reality
America’s best-known rock promoter brought local acts like the Grateful Dead to the national stage. A new exhibition in Manhattan shows how he did it.
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You still hear the people sing: Les Mis protest anthem blazes from France to China 13 Feb 8:17am You still hear the people sing: Les Mis protest anthem blazes from France to China
The defiant lyrics to the classic Les Misérables track are reverberating through uprisings in Hong Kong and China It has soared during an airport sit-in, united street protests and drowned out the Chinese national anthem at a school assembly. Do You Hear the People Sing?, the defiant chorus from the musical
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Lesley Manville: ‘I went hopping and skipping and giggling to the Oscars’ 9 Feb 4:00am Lesley Manville: ‘I went hopping and skipping and giggling to the Oscars’
Now starring in The Visit at the National Theatre, the actor talks about work ethic and success without compromise Lesley Manville is, at 63, at the top of her game. Nominated for an Oscar for her part in
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Why you can cut out and keep Cold War Steve’s latest show 8 Feb 9:35am Why you can cut out and keep Cold War Steve’s latest show
The artist, whose satirical collages poke fun at politicians, has created a free ‘downloadable’ exhibition for fansLast year, it was the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, a neoclassical building set in glorious parkland and containing works by DalÍ, Picasso and Miró. This year, the work of the artist known as
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7 Feb 2:49am Jimmy Kimmel Endures Trump’s ‘Pettysburg Address’
The president used the National Prayer Breakfast “to lash out at those who oppose him, just as Jesus would have done,” Kimmel said.
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At the Super Bowl, the Political Was Debatable 4 Feb 2:22pm Updated At the Super Bowl, the Political Was Debatable
J. Lo wore a Puerto Rican flag. Children appeared in orbs that looked like cages. Beyoncé and Jay-Z sat during the national anthem. Were they all saying something?
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Andy Gill: genius guitarist who burned a route out of punk | Alexis Petridis 2 Feb 10:26am Andy Gill: genius guitarist who burned a route out of punk | Alexis Petridis
By mixing hard rock, punk and funk with radical theory, the late musician unleashed a fresh and furious sound Britain’s late 70s provincial punk scenes were seldom places for the faint-hearted, but few were as starkly polarised as that in Leeds. At one extreme, the city had a large National Front presence: Leeds has the dubious distinction of the giving the world its first openly Nazi punk bands, the Dentists and the Ventz. At the other, there were the
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National Asian American Theater Partners With Regional Companies 30 Jan 12:53pm National Asian American Theater Partners With Regional Companies
The initiative, with New York Theater Workshop, Soho Rep and others, aims to foster inclusion of Asian-American theater artists, technicians and administrators.
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‘National Lampoon: Lemmings’ Reboot Coming to New York 29 Jan 2:38pm Updated ‘National Lampoon: Lemmings’ Reboot Coming to New York
“Lemmings: 21st Century,” a satire on modern festival culture, will have a two-night engagement in March.
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28 Jan 8:19pm National Television Awards highlights in two minutes
The winners include Mrs Brown's Boys, Jesy Nelson, Sir Michael Palin and of course... Ant and Dec.
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28 Jan 6:51pm Updated National Television Awards 2020: Mrs Brown beats Ricky Gervais and Fleabag
The sitcom wins for a fifth year, while Ant and Dec, Jesy Nelson and Michael Palin are also honoured.
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28 Jan 3:41pm National Television Awards 2020: Red carpet in pictures
The biggest names in telly step out in force for the 25th NTA's.
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Dozens of UK theatres at risk of being demolished, experts say 28 Jan 5:00am Dozens of UK theatres at risk of being demolished, experts say
Theatres Trust urges people to try and persuade local councils to invest in buildings The UK’s cultural heritage is at risk unless there is a significant shift in how theatre buildings are preserved, according to a study which shows that dozens of institutions could be lost. The annual Theatres at Risk register, which is collated by the Theatres Trust – the national advisory public body for theatres – lists 30 buildings across England, Scotland and Wales it believes could be demolished or redeveloped, despite having a potential future if restored.
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28 Jan 3:45am Late Night Links John Bolton’s Moral Courage and His Projected Book Sales
James Corden said Bolton, the former national security adviser, proves that Republicans can go against their party “as long as it’s perfectly timed with the release of a book.”
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What’s on TV Saturday: ‘The Cave’ and a New ‘Sabrina’ Season 25 Jan 1:00am What’s on TV Saturday: ‘The Cave’ and a New ‘Sabrina’ Season
A Syrian documentary is on National Geographic. And “Chilling Adventures of Sabrina” returns to Netflix.
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Gloomy Van Gogh self-portrait in Oslo gallery confirmed authentic 20 Jan 9:58am Updated Gloomy Van Gogh self-portrait in Oslo gallery confirmed authentic
Only known painting by Dutch master while he had psychosis is ‘unmistakably’ his work After decades of doubt, a gloomy self-portrait has been authenticated as a genuine work by Vincent van Gogh and the only known work painted while he had psychosis. Self-Portrait (1889) has been in Norway’s national collection since 1910 but its authenticity has been openly questioned since 1970. On Monday,
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Frida Kahlo Could Barely Walk. In This Ballet, She Dances. 20 Jan 3:47am Updated Frida Kahlo Could Barely Walk. In This Ballet, She Dances.
A work premiering at the Dutch National Ballet will animate the Mexican painter’s emotional world and artistic legacy.
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Citizen Bravo, Raymond MacDonald and Friends: Return to Y’Hup: The World of Ivor Cutler review – charming tribute to a national treasure 18 Jan 11:00am Citizen Bravo, Raymond MacDonald and Friends: Return to Y’Hup: The World of Ivor Cutler review – charming tribute to a national treasure
(Chemikal Underground) Surveying Rip It Up, the National Museum of Scotland’s 2018 celebration of Caledonian pop,
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Ickworth embraces enforced darkness to spotlight art collection 17 Jan 1:00am Ickworth embraces enforced darkness to spotlight art collection
Rotunda at National Trust property exploits gloom from scaffolding to stage exhibition A 200-year-old Italianate palace, hidden away in the Suffolk countryside and currently encased in more than 270 miles of scaffolding, is to hold an exhibition that is only taking place because it is undergoing £5m of conservation works.
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National Endowment for the Humanities Announces New Grants 14 Jan 10:00am Updated National Endowment for the Humanities Announces New Grants
This round of funding totals $30.9 million and will support 188 projects across the country.
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Ex-English National Ballet principal faces 14 counts of sexual assault 9 Jan 9:47am Ex-English National Ballet principal faces 14 counts of sexual assault
Yat-Sen Chang appears in court charged with assaulting three females at dance school A former English National Ballet principal dancer accused of sexually assaulting three females at a London dance school has appeared in court. Yat-Sen Chang, 48, was granted conditional bail after a short hearing at Westminster magistrates court on Thursday.
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Reimagining Old Friends at the National Theater in London 6 Jan 4:26pm Reimagining Old Friends at the National Theater in London
New takes on beloved works by Elena Ferrante, Anton Chekhov and Neil Gaiman testify to the pleasures and perils of adaptation.
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1 Jan 7:01pm An Indian former software analyst has written a new ‘national’ anthem for Mars.
An Indian former software analyst who’s now a rising star in the opera world has written a new ‘national’ anthem for Mars.
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Couture Creations for Dancing Bodies 1 Jan 5:00am Couture Creations for Dancing Bodies
An exhibition at the Centre National du Costume de Scène in France considers the dialogue between the stage and the runway.
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Kitty Empire’s best pop and rock of 2019 30 Dec 2019, 4:00am Kitty Empire’s best pop and rock of 2019
Grime came of age, a different kind of female pop performer cracked the charts and Chinese video-sharing app TikTok revolutionised the way fans engaged with the stars Sometimes pop moves glacially slowly. In the early 00s, a new kind of punk emerged in London: fast, angry, uncouth – but made by black Britons, so gatekeepers didn’t recognise it as an asset. Twenty years later, in 2019, grime has come gloriously of age: Stormzy is a national treasure, with a
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Can a £120m festival of culture save the UK post-Brexit? 22 Dec 2019, 4:00am Can a £120m festival of culture save the UK post-Brexit?
If a nebulous celebration can’t bring us together, maybe borrowing art from the National Portrait Gallery will do the trick
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Charles Dickens’s final Christmas turkey lost by Great Western Railway 18 Dec 2019, 7:11am Charles Dickens’s final Christmas turkey lost by Great Western Railway
Rediscovered letter records that 30lb bird was dispatched by train but transferred to a replacement coach service that caught fire Charles Dickens’s stoic response to the destruction of his Christmas turkey in a train fire has been revealed in a letter rediscovered at the National Railway Museum in York, in which the author says he “bore the loss with unbroken good humour towards the Great Western Railway Company”.
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National Gallery buys Orazio Gentileschi masterpiece for £22m 18 Dec 2019, 6:49am National Gallery buys Orazio Gentileschi masterpiece for £22m
The Finding of Moses – on loan to gallery for nearly 20 years – bought with help of the public The
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Fawlty Towers actor Nicky Henson dies at 74 16 Dec 2019, 6:40am Fawlty Towers actor Nicky Henson dies at 74
Actor who also appeared in EastEnders and Downton Abbey was diagnosed with cancer 20 years ago The Fawlty Towers actor Nicky Henson has died at the age of 74. Henson, who also appeared in EastEnders, Downton Abbey and a number of stage roles with the Royal Shakespeare Company and National Theatre, was diagnosed with cancer almost 20 years ago.
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‘She’s Gotta Have It’ and ‘Purple Rain’ Join National Film Registry 12 Dec 2019, 8:26am Updated ‘She’s Gotta Have It’ and ‘Purple Rain’ Join National Film Registry
The movies are among 25 selected by the Library of Congress and include breakthrough works by female directors and several musical features.
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Book prize judge alleges co-jurors did not finish reading shortlist 9 Dec 2019, 9:48am Book prize judge alleges co-jurors did not finish reading shortlist
Lesley McDowell was one of five judges for the Saltire Scottish fiction book of the year, but claims gender bias slanted decision against Lucy Ellmann A judge of one of Scotland’s most prestigious literary awards has resigned over its choice of winner, claiming that her fellow judges had not read all of the books, and selected a book by a male author about a woman over three books by women about women. The Saltire Society literary awards gave out a host of prizes at the National Museum of Scotland last weekend. The Scottish fiction book of the year went to Ewan Morrison for his novel Nina X, described by judges as a “great feat of imagination, showing digital modernity through the eyes of a young woman emerging from a lifetime within the confines of a Maoist commune”.
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Fairytale of New York is most popular Christmas song in UK, despite lyrics controversy 4 Dec 2019, 6:49am Fairytale of New York is most popular Christmas song in UK, despite lyrics controversy
Accusations of a homophobic slur in lyrics haven’t dampened song’s popularity, which was most-played Christmas hit on UK radio last year The Pogues’ Fairytale of New York has been voted the most popular Christmas song in the UK in a survey by PRS for Music, and was also the most played Christmas song on British radio last year – despite ongoing controversy around its lyrics. The song has been subject to criticism in recent years for its lyric, sung by Kirsty MacColl: “You scumbag, you maggot, you cheap lousy faggot.” In 2018, Eoghan McDermott, a DJ for Irish national broadcaster RTE, had called for the lyric to be censored, arguing: “Enough vitriol out there without gay people having to feel uncomfortable so people that aren’t affected by an insult can tap their toe.” Pogues frontman Shane MacGowan responded, saying it was “not intended to offend … The word was used by the character because it fitted with the way she would speak and with her character … She is not supposed to be a nice person, or even a wholesome person. She is a woman of a certain generation at a certain time in history, and she is down on her luck and desperate.”
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The Dirty War on the National Health Service review – fierce and necessary diatribe 28 Nov 2019, 10:00am The Dirty War on the National Health Service review – fierce and necessary diatribe
John Pilger’s passionate film addresses threats to the NHS, from the burgeoning presence of private healthcare companies to the invasion of bureaucrats Veteran campaigning reporter
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American Dialogue review: elegant history meets the raw politics of now 28 Nov 2019, 1:00am American Dialogue review: elegant history meets the raw politics of now
Washington, Jefferson, Madison and Adams teach us a lot but applying their lessons to the Trump era seems a thankless task History is misused. Perhaps worse, history is too often ignored. To address both problems, Joseph Ellis hopes to restore dialogue in national life, using the Founders as touchstones rather than infallible guides.
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Vibras! How J Balvin took on English-language pop – and won 27 Nov 2019, 6:07am Vibras! How J Balvin took on English-language pop – and won
Balvin was a minor Colombian artist who became the fifth most streamed on the planet without using English, showing how embracing national pride can be a force for cultural good
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Gahan Wilson, Vividly Macabre Cartoonist, Dies at 89 23 Nov 2019, 4:52pm Updated Gahan Wilson, Vividly Macabre Cartoonist, Dies at 89
His work — seen in National Lampoon, Playboy, The New Yorker and other magazines — was full of visual surprises and black humor.
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R.N.C. Spent Nearly $100,000 on Copies of Donald Trump Jr.’s Book 21 Nov 2019, 8:45pm R.N.C. Spent Nearly $100,000 on Copies of Donald Trump Jr.’s Book
“Triggered,” published Nov. 5, topped the best-seller list thanks in part to a big order from the Republican National Committee.
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A 50p cuppa and a £2m flat: how one London street captures the divisions of Brexit 21 Nov 2019, 10:22am A 50p cuppa and a £2m flat: how one London street captures the divisions of Brexit
Filmed over four years, The Street documents the ‘hyper-gentrification’ of Hoxton Street in east London, where locals depend on soup kitchens, £2m penthouses are for sale and you can wash down pie-and-mash with a craft beer The pie-and-mash shop proprietor gazes out of his window at the craft beer store across the road. Outside the art gallery opening, a soup kitchen serves meals to locals in need. Billboards advertise new luxury apartments with concierge and gym while an old man beds down for the night under the footbridge. The baker closes after 150 years, while a media startup suggests sitting in a bathtub full of coloured balls to improve creativity. The Street is a new documentary that captures the textbook contrasts of the shabby old East End and the new influx of hipsters, property speculators and entrepreneurs in the area. Filmed over four years in a single location – Hoxton Street in Hackney, a stone’s throw from Shoreditch – the film reflects a much wider picture. It is not just about gentrification, but all that feeds into it: history, economics, politics, urbanisation, immigration – how changes in national policy register on the human scale, decades later. It is Brexit Britain in microcosm.
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Remembering National Book Award Winners of the Past 20 Nov 2019, 11:20pm Updated Remembering National Book Award Winners of the Past
On the day the 2019 honorees were unveiled, we recall recipients who have died in recent years.
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Susan Choi Wins National Book Award for ‘Trust Exercise’ 20 Nov 2019, 10:34pm Updated Susan Choi Wins National Book Award for ‘Trust Exercise’
This year’s fiction finalists represented a diverse cross-section of contemporary literature, while memoirs dominated the nonfiction category.
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After Hiatus, Trump Awards National Arts and Humanities Medals 19 Nov 2019, 7:56pm After Hiatus, Trump Awards National Arts and Humanities Medals
This year’s winners include Alison Krauss, Jon Voight, James Patterson and the musicians of the United States military.
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Glimpses of women through time: 130 years of National Geographic images 19 Nov 2019, 1:00am Glimpses of women through time: 130 years of National Geographic images
In anticipation of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, National Geographic has published
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Rubens landscapes to be reunited for display after centuries apart 18 Nov 2019, 10:57am Rubens landscapes to be reunited for display after centuries apart
National Gallery to get Titian in return after Wallace Collection decides to begin loaning works Two landscapes by Peter Paul Rubens intended as companion pieces are to be reunited for public display for the first time in more than 200 years thanks to a decision most thought improbable. The National Gallery is loaning
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Steve McQueen: Year 3 review – skewed ties, missing teeth and hope 17 Nov 2019, 4:00am Steve McQueen: Year 3 review – skewed ties, missing teeth and hope
Tate Britain; National Gallery, London
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Review: A Conductor and Soprano Test Wagnerian Waters 14 Nov 2019, 1:34pm Review: A Conductor and Soprano Test Wagnerian Waters
Gianandrea Noseda led Christine Goerke and the National Symphony Orchestra in Act II of “Tristan und Isolde.”
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‘Scandalous’ Review: Riches From a Supermarket Rag 14 Nov 2019, 7:00am ‘Scandalous’ Review: Riches From a Supermarket Rag
A documentary on the National Enquirer pays tribute to a halcyon era of dirt digging.
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11 Nov 2019, 9:34am Scottish gallery to pull BP Portrait Award exhibition from 2020
The Scottish National Portrait Gallery says wants "to address the climate emergency".
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National Galleries Scotland to end BP ties over climate concerns 11 Nov 2019, 8:10am National Galleries Scotland to end BP ties over climate concerns
Move increases pressure on London’s National Portrait Gallery to sever its links National Galleries Scotland (NGS) has become the latest arts organisation to end links to BP, citing its “responsibility to do all we can to address the climate emergency”. It said on Monday that the 2019 BP Portrait Award exhibition opening at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh on 7 December would be the last time it would take place there in its present form.
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8 Nov 2019, 4:06pm Marciano Art Foundation Is Accused of Unfair Labor Practices
Employees were laid off after moving to unionize. Now a union is filing a charge at the National Labor Relations Board.
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Victoria and Albert Museum Names Leader for East London Outpost 8 Nov 2019, 1:08pm Victoria and Albert Museum Names Leader for East London Outpost
Gus Casely-Hayford, who has served as the director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art since 2018, will be the V&A East’s inaugural director.
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8 Nov 2019, 6:00am The Teenage Ghosts in Laura Ruby’s National Book Award Finalist Never Sleep
“Thirteen Doorways, Wolves Behind Them All” is set during World War II in a Chicago orphanage, where teenagers — some of them ghosts — seek answers.
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Jean Heywood obituary 7 Nov 2019, 9:43am Jean Heywood obituary
Character actor who starred as Bella Seaton in the BBC TV drama series When the Boat Comes InJean Heywood, who has died aged 98, was a character actor who found herself catapulted to national fame in 1976 as Bella, the matriarch who holds the poverty-stricken Seaton family together in the BBC TV drama When the Boat Comes In,
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We Are Made of Diamond Stuff by Isabel Waidner review – cutting edge 6 Nov 2019, 7:00am We Are Made of Diamond Stuff by Isabel Waidner review – cutting edge
Shortlisted for the Goldsmiths prize, this innovative state-of-the-nation novel shows razor-sharp wit and rage Isabel Waidner’s Goldsmiths prize-shortlisted second novel is a dizzying 113-page disquisition on working-class culture, queerness, race and vanished empire. Set largely in a “no-star hotel” in Ryde on the Isle of Wight, it crackles with sly subversive wit and rage at the inequities of life in contemporary Britain. In a series of surreal episodes, the unnamed narrator, who we are told is an “EU national”, and Shae, described as “a second-generation economic migrant”, endure minimum-wage work at the hotel, while joyously revelling in their otherness. Shae is “working class and also queer (there’s no hiding it)”. They (as Shae, the narrator and Waidner all prefer to be identified) are “looking for their parent”, while the narrator is preparing to take the Life in the UK test, an ordeal replete with trick questions (“Who wrote ‘The Daffodil?’”).
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The Man in the Red Coat by Julian Barnes review - a belle epoque womaniser 6 Nov 2019, 2:30am The Man in the Red Coat by Julian Barnes review - a belle epoque womaniser
A virtuoso gynaecologist is placed skilfully at the centre of a web of connections in an era of Parisian decadence Among all the divinely swaggering paintings in the John Singer Sargent exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in 2015, one in particular seemed to sing out from the wall. In
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5 Nov 2019, 9:50am National Portrait Gallery to close for three years
Its art will tour the UK while the London gallery is being redeveloped.
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How to Get the Most Out of National Novel Writing Month 4 Nov 2019, 3:39pm How to Get the Most Out of National Novel Writing Month
Embrace your messy first draft and commit to NaNoWriMo’s boot-camp vibe.
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Seventeenth-century portrait of St Agatha comes home to Osterley 31 Oct 2019, 12:53pm Seventeenth-century portrait of St Agatha comes home to Osterley
National Trust bought Carlo Dolci painting to return it to the house where it once hung A powerful 17th-century portrait of the Christian martyr St Agatha has gone on display at the Georgian mansion and country estate where it was once a star of the art collection. The painting, by the devout Catholic Florentine artist Carlo Dolci, was bought by the National Trust last year to return it to its “home” of Osterley House in west London.
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The Antipodes review – Annie Baker searches for the sting in the tale 31 Oct 2019, 7:04am The Antipodes review – Annie Baker searches for the sting in the tale
Dorfman, National Theatre, London
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Local TV Revives a Bygone Tradition: Airing the National Anthem 30 Oct 2019, 12:21pm Updated Local TV Revives a Bygone Tradition: Airing the National Anthem
Broadcasters bringing back “The Star-Spangled Banner” as a daily feature say they are encouraging unity, but the song can also be a dividing line.
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One language dies every two weeks. How can poetry help? – books podcast 29 Oct 2019, 2:00am One language dies every two weeks. How can poetry help? – books podcast
On this week’s show, we look at endangered languages around the world and how poets and publishers are fighting to keep them alive. Sian sits down with Chris McCabe from the National Poetry Library, which has been asking the public to contribute to a database of endangered languages since 2017. The resulting anthology, Poems from the Edge of Extinction, features poems in languages from Assyrian to Zoque. Two poets in the collection – Valzhyna Mort, who writes in Belarusian, and Vaughan Rapatahana, who writes in Te Reo – talk about their efforts to spread awareness of their languages. And Clive Boutle, who runs independent publisher
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Being John Malkovich at 20: why the surrealist comedy demands a rewatch 29 Oct 2019, 1:00am Being John Malkovich at 20: why the surrealist comedy demands a rewatch
One of the most fascinatingly strange and unpredictable films of 1999 still carries with it more pleasures to be discovered When Being John Malkovich opened in 1999, nobody knew the name of its screenwriter, Charlie Kaufman, who’d spent the previous 15 years laboring in the comedy salt mines, submitting articles on spec to National Lampoon, writing a number of unproduced pilots, and landing gigs on short-lived (if beloved) sketch shows like Get a Life and The Dana Carvey Show. Yet as soon as it premiered – and for every project he did afterwards – it was talked about as a Charlie Kaufman film, even though it was directed by Spike Jonze, whose work on innovative commercials and videos for Weezer (Buddy Holly), Beastie Boys (Sabotage), and others had earned him a reputation as one of the most sought-after talents in the business. This was virtually unprecedented; even Robert Towne, whose script for Chinatown is frequently cited among the best ever written, wasn’t credited over its director, Roman Polanski.
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E.A. Carmean,Who Forsook a Life in Art for the Church, Dies at 74 25 Oct 2019, 8:14pm E.A. Carmean,Who Forsook a Life in Art for the Church, Dies at 74
An expert on European and American modernism, he was most notably the founding curator of the National Gallery’s department of 20th-century art.
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24 Oct 2019, 12:00pm National Dance Institute Starts Teacher Training Program
The organization will offer intensive on-site instruction for teachers and consulting services for dance education groups.
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Art by the Numbers 23 Oct 2019, 5:00am Art by the Numbers
At the National Museum of Mathematics, origami helps bridge the gap between art and math and finds the beauty in both.
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It’s Fall, So the Best-Seller Lists Are Brimming With New Books 18 Oct 2019, 5:16pm It’s Fall, So the Best-Seller Lists Are Brimming With New Books
One of them, Jason Reynolds’s middle-grade novel “Look Both Ways,” is a National Book Award finalist.
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Alicia Alonso, Star of Cuba’s National Ballet, Dies at 98 18 Oct 2019, 12:08pm Updated Alicia Alonso, Star of Cuba’s National Ballet, Dies at 98
A ballerina of unusual range and power, she continued to dance into her 70s despite chronic vision problems.
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17 Oct 2019, 10:22pm Channel 4 move makes Leeds the new media city
The broadcaster opens a new "national HQ" to better reflect life across Britain.
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15 Oct 2019, 4:40pm Updated New Short Fiction, Including a National Book Foundation Honoree
Ashley Wurzbacher’s debut, “Happy Like This,” is among this fall’s standout story collections.
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Gauguin at the National Gallery review – portrait of a troubling talent 15 Oct 2019, 9:05am Gauguin at the National Gallery review – portrait of a troubling talent
This efficient documentary doesn’t shy away from the problems this post-impressionist star poses for art lovers today T
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12 Oct 2019, 10:29am Radio 2 reveals the best-selling albums of the 21st Century
BBC Radio 2 reveals the UK's most popular records of the 2000s, to mark National Album Day.
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Elizabeth Peyton: Aire and Angels review – beautiful loners 12 Oct 2019, 10:00am Elizabeth Peyton: Aire and Angels review – beautiful loners
National Portrait Gallery, London
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10 Oct 2019, 2:02pm In ‘Verrocchio,’ Leonardo’s Master Is the Star
A sparkling show at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., reintroduces the Florentine sculptor who set the bar for virtuosity.
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The Wall: proper nonsense – but proof that Danny Dyer is now a national icon 9 Oct 2019, 6:09am The Wall: proper nonsense – but proof that Danny Dyer is now a national icon
His new Saturday night gameshow is far from gamechanging, but it cements the former wideboy as hot TV property ‘I’m Danny Dyer and this is The Wall – the ultimate game of risk and reward!” So begins the newest chapter of Britain’s most unexpected national treasure, and the moment is notable for a couple of points. The first is that, as he says this, Dyer somehow manages to manspread extravagantly, despite standing alone on an empty stage the size of an aircraft carrier. And, second, The Wall is definitively not the ultimate game of risk and reward. Rather, it’s an identikit, luck-based Saturday night BBC One gameshow, which means it doesn’t even scrape into the top nine tenths of risk v reward. Going outside in October without an umbrella is risk v reward. Brexit is risk v reward. Committing to a poo before checking for toilet paper is risk v reward. This is just a barely warmed-up version of one of those convoluted parlour games they used to pad out the results of the National Lottery draw. It could quite easily have been presented by Shane Richie, or Jason Manford, or Rylan, or a spoon with a face drawn on it.
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8 Oct 2019, 4:46pm In Jason Reynolds’s Powerful New Book, Stories Stitch Together a Neighborhood
The kids in “Look Both Ways,” a National Book Award finalist, share hustles, jokes, video games, board tricks, secret messages and private dreams.
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Beleaguered English National Opera Announces New Artistic Director 8 Oct 2019, 11:55am Beleaguered English National Opera Announces New Artistic Director
Annilese Miskimmon, of Norway’s National Opera, is joining the troubled company, after Daniel Kramer’s resignation in April.
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National Book Awards Names 2019 Finalists 8 Oct 2019, 10:40am National Book Awards Names 2019 Finalists
Books by Marlon James, Sarah M. Broom, Yoko Ogawa and Jason Reynolds are among this year’s finalists.
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English National Opera names Annilese Miskimmon as new artistic director 8 Oct 2019, 8:56am English National Opera names Annilese Miskimmon as new artistic director
ENO has announced the Belfast-born director will replace Daniel Kramer in 2020, with a remit to broaden opera’s audience Annilese Miskimmon, the Belfast-born opera director who has drawn influence from Sondheim, Shakespeare and the Muppets, has been named as the new artistic director of English National Opera (ENO), after a search to replace Daniel Kramer who
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4 Oct 2019, 11:15am National Theatre to end Shell sponsorship
The London venue made the decision over the oil giant as it declared a climate emergency.
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National Theatre to end Shell sponsorship deal from next year 4 Oct 2019, 10:24am National Theatre to end Shell sponsorship deal from next year
Move comes as opposition grows to fossil fuel firms’ sponsorship of UK arts bodies
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Sea of Shadows review – porpoise documentary slips through the net 26 Sep 2019, 12:00pm Sea of Shadows review – porpoise documentary slips through the net
National Geographic’s film about the endangered vaquita – victim of Mexican gangsters’ search for ‘the cocaine of the seas’ – is a wasted opportunity The sad plight of the
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Colson Whitehead, Marlon James in Running for National Book Awards 20 Sep 2019, 10:45am Colson Whitehead, Marlon James in Running for National Book Awards
Whitehead, who won in 2016, was nominated this year for “The Nickel Boys,” one of 10 novels longlisted.
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Nazism, slavery, empire: can countries learn from national evil? 13 Sep 2019, 3:59am Nazism, slavery, empire: can countries learn from national evil?
Moral philosopher Susan Neiman has studied how Germany came to terms with the crimes of nazism. She explains why the US and Britain should take note When
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11 Sep 2019, 1:20am BBC National Orchestra of Wales appoints new conductor
Californian Ryan Bancroft is the new principal conductor of the BBC National Orchestra of Wales.
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The Forces That Are Killing the American Dream 10 Sep 2019, 1:36pm The Forces That Are Killing the American Dream
Nicholas Lemann’s “Transaction Man” traces the national deterioration from a more equitable country to a more unjust one.
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Peter Nichols, playwright best known for Joe Egg, dies aged 92 9 Sep 2019, 7:15am Peter Nichols, playwright best known for Joe Egg, dies aged 92
The British writer, whose plays include Privates on Parade and The National Health, died on Saturday The playwright
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6 Sep 2019, 11:09pm Updated In Australia, Television ‘Content’ Designed for Your Phone
A new show from Australia’s national broadcaster is shot on smartphones and should be watched on one, too.
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6 Sep 2019, 2:49am Trump’s Dorian Tweets Continue to Baffle Late-Night Hosts
“The National Weather Service has to monitor the president’s tweets as closely as they monitor actual hurricanes,” Seth Meyers joked Thursday.
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‘Heading Home: The Tale of Team Israel’ Review: When Baseball Is a Religion 5 Sep 2019, 11:35pm ‘Heading Home: The Tale of Team Israel’ Review: When Baseball Is a Religion
A documentary on Jewish-Americans who played for Israel’s national baseball team takes a softball approach.
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Why The Third Man is an essential primer for no-deal Brexit 5 Sep 2019, 6:57am Why The Third Man is an essential primer for no-deal Brexit
As the classic noir gets a 70th anniversary re-release, it’s hard to ignore the parallels between a shattered postwar Vienna teeming with spivs and the future the Brexiters have in mind What perfect timing for The Third Man to step back out of the shadows. Often hailed as the finest film Britain ever made, a 70th anniversary re-release will see it return to cinemas with the government much in the market for symbols of national grandeur. While Boris Johnson has named his favourite film as Dodgeball – for once, eerily believable – as the great British breakdown goes on it is easy to imagine him waving a tiny Union Jack at Carol Reed’s majestic noir. It is true, of course, that there could be no better moment for The Third Man to reappear – just not as a cosy patriotic treat. Rather, it is a cold premonition of no-deal Britain.
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A shining light: Peter Gill, the unsung hero of British theatre 4 Sep 2019, 3:00am A shining light: Peter Gill, the unsung hero of British theatre
He’s written 18 plays, rescued DH Lawrence from theatrical oblivion and played a crucial role at the National Theatre – all the while putting love, loss and the working class centre stage Eighty seems a fashionable age in the theatre this year.
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Why ChuckleVision is the greatest CBBC show ever 29 Aug 2019, 7:36am Why ChuckleVision is the greatest CBBC show ever
The slapstick series, which has been voted the network’s best, had charm by the bucket-load and made the brothers national treasures – despite their more unsavoury moments ChuckleVision has been named
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Man vs Wild with Bear Grylls and PM Modi review – the most tasteless TV ever 15 Aug 2019, 7:05pm Man vs Wild with Bear Grylls and PM Modi review – the most tasteless TV ever
In this monstrous propaganda stunt, strongmen Bear Grylls and Narendra Modi sniff elephant dung in the wilderness while a terror attack plays out in Kashmir. God help us all In the foothills of the Himalayas, the heavens open and toxic rain drills the earth of Jim Corbett national park. Bear Grylls is pacing like a … No! Stop! Resist the Grylls compulsion to reverse anthropomorphise. Like a … posh white ex-SAS soldier-turned-“survivalist” exaggerating jeopardy for the sake of his TV series (on Discovery Channel). Better. He has got “pre-match nerves”. This is what happens when “two men and a bunch of Secret Service meet in the jungle surrounded by tigers”. And the other man squaring up to the wild happens to be the prime minister of India. Hours later, the motorcade appears carrying the far-right nationalist leader once widely rebuked as a Hindu supremacist, but now a perfectly palatable subject for the Grylls treatment. Come on, Grylls took Barack Obama to Alaska. In the reign of false equivalence, why not Narendra Modi?
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Denmark Has a National Songbook. Should It Mention Ramadan? 13 Aug 2019, 12:01am Updated Denmark Has a National Songbook. Should It Mention Ramadan?
Communal morning singing is a cherished tradition, anchored by the country’s best-selling book. And it’s become an unlikely focus for debates about immigration and national identity.
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Jackie Kay on putting her adoption on stage – and getting a pay rise for her successor 7 Aug 2019, 11:50am Jackie Kay on putting her adoption on stage – and getting a pay rise for her successor
When Scotland’s national poet travelled to Nigeria to ask her birth father if he ever thought of her, he said no. Does it hurt to put this on stage? And should the next ‘makar’ be on £30,000? Before Jackie Kay was a writer, she was a character. “When you’re adopted,” she explains over lunch in a Glasgow cafe, “you come with a story.” Her adoptive mother Helen – fascinated by her possible origins – encouraged young Kay to speculate about her birth parents. It was known that her father was Nigerian, her mother a white woman from the Scottish Highlands. Were they, perhaps, torn apart by racial prejudice in 1960s Scotland? There was tragic romance to that idea, and a fairytale quality in the notion that Kay, offspring of forbidden love, should come to live with John and Helen, two people who had plenty of love – not to mention songs and stories – to share. Little wonder that Kay has come to think of herself as a creature not only of genetics but of the imagination. As
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Israel National Library unveils reclaimed Franz Kafka archive 7 Aug 2019, 11:34am Israel National Library unveils reclaimed Franz Kafka archive
Papers and manuscripts were salvaged by author’s friend Max Brod Israel’s National Library has unveiled a missing batch of
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Ibram X. Kendi Has a Cure for America’s ‘Metastatic Racism’ 7 Aug 2019, 9:26am Updated Ibram X. Kendi Has a Cure for America’s ‘Metastatic Racism’
In 2016, he was a surprise National Book Award winner for a sweeping history of ever-mutating American racism. Now, he’s back with a new book that outlines how to fight it.
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Child ‘thrown’ from Tate Modern is French national, police say 5 Aug 2019, 11:44am Child ‘thrown’ from Tate Modern is French national, police say
Teenager arrested as boy, 6, remains in hospital in stable but critical condition
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Rare Bonington landscape on display at National Gallery 5 Aug 2019, 7:31am Rare Bonington landscape on display at National Gallery
View on River Seine – Morning by 19th-century British artist acquired for nation Richard Parkes Bonington was a contemporary of Constable and Turner, but his death at the age of 25 from tuberculosis excluded him from the casual art lovers’ radar. Now, visitors to the
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1 Aug 2019, 1:09pm Updated Edward Snowden’s Memoir Is Coming in September
The National Security Agency whistle-blower has written a book exploring his role in mass surveillance and the “crisis of conscience” that led to his actions.
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24 Jul 2019, 3:59pm Updated Leon Kossoff, 92, Who Painted Portraits of Urban Life, Dies
His primary subjects were his family and friends, the many glories of London, and old master paintings in the National Gallery.
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22 Jul 2019, 4:03pm Leon Kossoff, Who Painted Portraits of Urban Life, Dies at 92
His primary subjects were his family and friends, the many glories of London, and old master paintings in the National Gallery.
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Hugh Southern, a Creator of the TKTS Booth, Dies at 87 22 Jul 2019, 1:53pm Updated Hugh Southern, a Creator of the TKTS Booth, Dies at 87
He held high-profile positions at the Metropolitan Opera and the National Endowment for the Arts, battling critics who wanted to abolish the agency.
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12 Jul 2019, 12:29am Updated ‘Sea of Shadows’ Review: A Suspenseful Story of Saving Porpoises
A National Geographic documentary on the threat to an endangered species in the Gulf of California has a violent twist.
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The Left Behind: a chilling film that digs into the deep roots of the far right 10 Jul 2019, 1:07pm The Left Behind: a chilling film that digs into the deep roots of the far right
A working-class lad from Wales dons a pig mask and performs a horrifying hate crime in a provocative new drama. It’s time to broach the staggering rise of extremism, its creators say ‘The perception of the far right in this country is outdated,” says Alan Harris, the writer of a provocative new drama, The Left Behind. “We think of skinheads and National Front marches. But things have changed – especially in terms of the online influence.” The phrase “far right” tends to conjure up visions of organised groups: Britain First in the UK, the marchers on Charlottesville in the US. Yet the reality can be far more diffuse. Think of the terrorist attack by Darren Osborne on the Finsbury Park mosque, or the shootings in Christchurch. They were committed by people whose relationship with the far right was forged almost exclusively online. Indeed, Osborne was said to have been radicalised in just three weeks, before he rammed a van into the London mosque, killing one and injuring at least nine more.
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The sardonic joy of the Black Country, where no one is spared a ribbing 10 Jul 2019, 8:01am The sardonic joy of the Black Country, where no one is spared a ribbing
The region has long been a national punchline. Funny, then, that it’s where you’ll find some of the country’s sharpest wits If ever, on a weekend, I get the train out of London and up through the countryside, I watch the buildings turn from stained cream to red brick. I see the reedy banks of water carrying herons and rainbow barge boats up towards locks and squat black lacquer bridges. The familiar shattered factories of Sandwell show up, followed by lorry depots, gas-canister clusters and (weirdly) a single perennial skip fire that herald the arrival to Wolverhampton station – home. Then I make a beeline straight for a certain pub. It’s in a Black Country town called Bilston. A small flat-roofed pub, on a small high street, opposite a big Lidl. It has live music eight times a week (twice on a Sunday). Jazz. The pub is always packed to the rafters. As you order a pint of Holden’s Bitter or Golden Glow, and possibly a pack of pork scratchings (at least two, in my case), your earholes will fill with two things. One, a muffled trombone that’s seen too many winters. Two, laughter. Tables full of Black Country folk spending two minutes out of every five telling a story or a joke then laughing for the remaining three. The rhythm is as steady as the drummer in the corner. It never breaks. If you’re not joking or laughing, you’re basically not breathing.
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Should Oil Money Fund the Arts? Leading British Artists Say No 7 Jul 2019, 9:24pm Updated Should Oil Money Fund the Arts? Leading British Artists Say No
The National Portrait Gallery in London is the latest institution to face high-profile protests over fossil-fuel sponsorship.
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Marie Ponsot, Poet and Winner of National Book Critics Circle Award, Dies at 98 6 Jul 2019, 10:43pm Marie Ponsot, Poet and Winner of National Book Critics Circle Award, Dies at 98
Her poetry — some of it stashed in a drawer for years — was tempered by divorce, years of being a single mother and her Roman Catholic faith.
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National Theatre defends asking lesbians to leave bar 6 Jul 2019, 11:22am National Theatre defends asking lesbians to leave bar
Women claim staff did not ‘like the T-shirts we are wearing’ but NT says the action was ‘a result of a series of disturbances’ The National Theatre has become embroiled in a bitter war of words after a group of lesbian friends was refused service in the venue’s Green Room bar in the run-up to the
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Tom Morris: ‘We need to grasp the extraordinary creativity of this country’ 6 Jul 2019, 11:00am Tom Morris: ‘We need to grasp the extraordinary creativity of this country’
The theatre director on politically jagged times, adapting Touching the Void for the stage, and Breaking the Waves as an opera Tom Morris was born in 1964. He ran Battersea Arts Centre, London, from 1995 to 2004 before moving to the National Theatre where he co-directed the worldwide hit
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Ancient city of Babylon heads list of Unesco world heritage sites 5 Jul 2019, 11:44am Ancient city of Babylon heads list of Unesco world heritage sites
UN also names national park in Iceland among sites protected for their value to humanity
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Top 10 books about walking in Britain | Gail Simmons 3 Jul 2019, 7:05am Top 10 books about walking in Britain | Gail Simmons
Travelling on foot is a national obsession that has inspired a whole tradition of great writing, from Laurie Lee to Iain Sinclair
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Ooh, Matron! Why Carry On films refuse to remain dead 2 Jul 2019, 10:40am Ooh, Matron! Why Carry On films refuse to remain dead
The return of Britain’s direst comedy franchise is thankfully nothing but a recurring rumour – but the fact that it’s persisting is cause for national alarm Great news! The Carry On films are coming back! Finally, a win for Britain. We might have become the global punchline to an unfunny joke, and things are almost certainly going to get worse, and we’re all going to die penniless and humiliated, scavenging for food with our broken fingernails, but the Carry On films are coming back! At last, we’ll get to show the world what we’re really good at: dirt cheap films that highlight our collective national fear of sexual arousal. Except they’re probably not coming back. Despite a flurry of excited noise last week, the truth is a little more mundane. Nobody is making a new Carry On film. All that’s happened is that the Intellectual Property Office invalidated some of ITV’s trademark rights to the series, allowing a film producer to begin planning a range of Carry On branded merchandise, which he hopes will eventually make enough money to fund a new film. Unless I’m sorely underestimating the appetite for novelty tit-shaped “Ooh, Matron!” mugs, it probably isn’t going to happen.
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Cindy Sherman review – a lifetime of making herself up 30 Jun 2019, 3:00am Cindy Sherman review – a lifetime of making herself up
National Portrait Gallery, London
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Jackie Kay and Tracy K Smith: what did one poet laureate say to the other? 30 Jun 2019, 3:00am Jackie Kay and Tracy K Smith: what did one poet laureate say to the other?
From being a public figure to poetry in the age of Trump, from old prejudice to new audiences: when US poet laureate Tracy K Smith met Jackie Kay, Scotland’s makar, they had a lot to talk about… “There are so many things that you get asked to do,” says Jackie Kay of her role as makar, or poet laureate of Scotland, “that you think, God, wouldn’t it be great to be one of those artists who have 10 or 15 people working for them and they all make this huge big painting? I’d love to have mini-makars. I’d give them this line to do and that commission, because there isn’t really enough of you to do everything you’re asked. It’s just not possible. I’m only the one makar.” Luckily this makar, the third since the position was established by the Scottish parliament in 2004, has found time to meet up in the lobby of a Manchester hotel, prior to an appearance at the city’s literary festival, and compare notes with another eminent national bard. Tracy K Smith is the 22nd poet laureate of the United States and the fourth woman of colour to occupy the role. Her second and final term has just ended – she will be succeeded by the Native American poet Joy Harjo – but she has plenty to discuss with Kay about the satisfactions and scarier aspects of the job.
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John Shearer, Who Photographed Tumultuous 1960s, Dies at 72 28 Jun 2019, 7:05pm Updated John Shearer, Who Photographed Tumultuous 1960s, Dies at 72
Mr. Shearer joined the staff of Look magazine at the age of 20, becoming one of the few black photographers at a major national publication.
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Spider-Man: Far from Home review – post-Endgame outing lacks Marvel sparkle 27 Jun 2019, 9:11am Spider-Man: Far from Home review – post-Endgame outing lacks Marvel sparkle
Tom Holland swings into Europe on a school trip that sees Prague under attack, Italy in danger – and Jake Gyllenhaal wearing a very weird helmet Well, not too far from home. In fact, we are on pretty familiar ground, despite Spider-Man now going on a hormonally charged school trip to Venice, Prague and other European cities whose national governments have given this film tax breaks. For all these exotic novelties, this is a very mainstream Marvel picture, written by Chris McKenna and Erik Sommers and directed by Jon Watts, culminating in the traditional CGI damage to tourist landmarks in the time-honoured final battle-spectacular. A new character has been perfunctorily added in the form of Mysterio (Gyllenhaal) and the film is certainly nowhere near the envelope-pushingly surreal ambition of
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Cindy Sherman review – pain-laced portraits of a shapeshifting enigma 25 Jun 2019, 9:29am Cindy Sherman review – pain-laced portraits of a shapeshifting enigma
National Portrait Gallery, London
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Rylan Clark-Neal: ‘I knew I had to be the gay stereotype – I played the game’ 25 Jun 2019, 1:00am Rylan Clark-Neal: ‘I knew I had to be the gay stereotype – I played the game’
The broadcaster found fame after his hysterical performance on The X Factor, but he has gone from national joke to national treasure – even if celebrity isn’t all it was cracked up to be At his home in Essex, Rylan Clark-Neal has an assortment of flatscreen TVs all tuned to his current favourite reality TV show. No, not
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The Impeachers review: Andrew Johnson and the men who nearly trumped him 23 Jun 2019, 1:00am The Impeachers review: Andrew Johnson and the men who nearly trumped him
Brenda Wineapple has written a book entirely right for its moment, a history of the perils and politics of impeachment Brenda Wineapple’s new book was surely timed for this moment. Working with the support of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities in 2016 and 2017, her research predated the Mueller investigation. But in some quarters, the tantalising thought of a third impeachment of a president was already in the air.
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17 Jun 2019, 8:32pm Updated Alan Brinkley, Leading Historian of 20th-Century America, Dies at 70
A National Book Award winner, he explored the seminal political events of the last century, including the Depression and World War II.
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Sometime Always Never review – a triple-word score of a movie 16 Jun 2019, 3:00am Sometime Always Never review – a triple-word score of a movie
Bill Nighy is a Scrabble-obsessed father grieving for a missing son in Frank Cottrell Boyce’s offbeat gem The presence of Bill Nighy, funeral-faced national treasure, will no doubt be a key selling point for this tragicomic drama. But the real star is behind the scenes. Screenwriter Frank Cottrell Boyce, who adapted the film from his own short story, has crafted a joy of a script, which seeds its themes as elegantly as Nighy’s character, Alan, a Scrabble-obsessed tailor, wears his suits. The danger of an offbeat British film, particularly one that is as emphatically designed as this, is that it could teeter into whimsy and artifice. But thanks to Cottrell Boyce, and the assured direction of first-time feature film-maker Carl Hunter, the emotional beats are authentic and the distinctive look of the film – it takes its aesthetic cues from 60s ties and 70s wallpaper – never upstages the story. Alan has spent his life preoccupied with the disappearance of his favourite son years before. Michael stormed out of the family home in a “nark” after a disagreement over a Scrabble game. The remaining son, Peter, (Sam Riley) has found himself measured against an absent rival in a competition he can never win. A childhood defined by “second best” – he played with Chad Valley Big League rather than Subbuteo – has shaped his adult life. The precision in the shot composition is mirrored in the storytelling – there’s an unassuming elegance that balances the eccentricity of a film that makes something as mundane as Scrabble into a taut dramatic device.
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You Know Frida Kahlo’s Face. Now You Can (Probably) Hear Her Voice. 13 Jun 2019, 12:58pm Updated You Know Frida Kahlo’s Face. Now You Can (Probably) Hear Her Voice.
The National Sound Library of Mexico has released a track that it believes is the only known surviving audio recording of the artist.
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Kate Tempest to rework Sophocles for National Theatre 13 Jun 2019, 8:49am Kate Tempest to rework Sophocles for National Theatre
Eight of 15 productions in theatre’s new season are written by women Kate Tempest’s reimagining of a Greek classic and an adaptation of
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Lesley Manville and Maxine Peake to star at National Theatre 13 Jun 2019, 8:37am Lesley Manville and Maxine Peake to star at National Theatre
The National Theatre announces which plays it will stage over the next year.
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Cindy Sherman: ‘I enjoy doing the really difficult things that people can’t buy’ 8 Jun 2019, 11:00am Cindy Sherman: ‘I enjoy doing the really difficult things that people can’t buy’
Ahead of a major London show, the artist talks about her childhood, therapy and her tricky relationship with success Perhaps the most intriguing exhibit in Cindy Sherman’s forthcoming retrospective at the National Portrait Gallery is the first,
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The Week in Arts: Alvin Ailey Goes Back to School; ‘Younger’ Returns to TV Land 8 Jun 2019, 2:00am The Week in Arts: Alvin Ailey Goes Back to School; ‘Younger’ Returns to TV Land
Dance performances celebrate the Ailey School’s 50th anniversary; a romantic comedy’s sixth season opens; and the National Gallery of Art becomes an animal house.
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The Patient Assassin by Anita Anand review – massacre, revenge and the Raj 5 Jun 2019, 4:00am The Patient Assassin by Anita Anand review – massacre, revenge and the Raj
The true tale of a flamboyant Sikh who killed an imperial die-hard to avenge the Amritsar massacre’s victimsOn the afternoon of 13 March 1940 a gunman entered a public meeting at Caxton Hall, Westminster, and assassinated Sir Michael O’Dwyer, a former lieutenant governor of Punjab. That primary job done, he took aim at other members of the platform party and wounded Lord Zetland, the secretary of state for India, Sir Louis Dane, who had been O’Dwyer’s predecessor, and Lord Lamington, a former governor of Bombay. This grand assembly of old India hands had just finished their discussion of Afghanistan and the threat posed to it by Germany’s then ally, the Soviet Union. They were relaxed and unaware of any danger; a better-equipped assassin would have made a clean sweep of all four. But the gunman, Udham Singh, had somehow managed to acquire the wrong calibre bullets for his Smith & Wesson; O’Dwyer alone died because he was shot in the back at point blank range and, as the first target, he had no time to defend himself. But O’Dwyer was the only victim Singh cared about – the rest were a bonus in a long-delayed act of revenge that had its origins more than 20 years before, when on 13 April 1919 troops led by General Reginald Dyer fired into a crowd of unarmed civilians in the city of Amritsar, killing either 379 (the official figure) or more than 1,000 of them (the unofficial estimate of the Indian National Congress). Indian fury at the slaughter extended well beyond the nascent independence movement, and the relationship between the rulers and ruled lurched into what became an unstoppable decline.
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Nano-robots and VR for refugees: EPSRC 2019 winners – in pictures 3 Jun 2019, 8:08am Nano-robots and VR for refugees: EPSRC 2019 winners – in pictures
An image of a Syrian refugee using virtual reality to help researchers design a shelter has been chosen as the winner of the 2019 national science photography competition organised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The competition attracted 169 entries from EPSRC-funded researchers
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Everett Raymond Kinstler, Prolific Portraitist, Dies at 92 31 May 2019, 5:33pm Updated Everett Raymond Kinstler, Prolific Portraitist, Dies at 92
He painted celebrities and politicians, including several presidents, and has dozens of works in the National Portrait Gallery collection.
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Unprecedented result in US National Spelling Bee 31 May 2019, 7:07am Unprecedented result in US National Spelling Bee
Erysipelas, bougainvillea, aiguillette - just some of the challenging words in a dramatic final.
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Freedom Fields review – Libyan female footballers hit back of the net 30 May 2019, 8:00am Freedom Fields review – Libyan female footballers hit back of the net
Nahiza Arebi’s visually arresting documentary focuses on the courage of the country’s fledgling national women’s team Where Hollywood opted for facile gender-flipping in its recent
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Running with Beto review – punchy political documentary glosses over grit 28 May 2019, 2:00am Running with Beto review – punchy political documentary glosses over grit
Beto O’Rourke’s senatorial run is put under the spotlight in an engaging if superficial look at the unlikely rise of a Democratic hero in a red state “Gotta run like there’s nothing to lose,” nods a sweat-drenched Beto O’Rourke. The three-term congressional representative for the Texas border city of El Paso has just returned from a run in his Washington DC neighborhood. It is around a year before the Texas senatorial election but he has already launched his campaign, in which he will visit all of the state’s counties, host town halls and, eventually, gain national attention, with cameras present for almost every minute. The HBO documentary Running with Beto details the now-presidential hopeful’s initial rise to political stardom in 2018 as a classic David versus Goliath. narrative.
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Follow the Bird Lady! Cinderella costume parade – in pictures 24 May 2019, 12:06pm Follow the Bird Lady! Cinderella costume parade – in pictures
Christopher Wheeldon is bringing his in-the-round Cinderella ballet to the Royal Albert Hall in London, complete with 370 costumes. We went behind the scenes for English National Ballet’s final preparations
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How does the reality TV show Cops stack up with real-life crime figures? 24 May 2019, 1:00am How does the reality TV show Cops stack up with real-life crime figures?
Creators of podcast Running from Cops watched 846 episodes and compared the numbers they found with national crime figures Reality TV can fail to live up to its name, conveying a version of the world that is a sidestep from the truth. And Cops was a show that was crucial to the genre – it’s not only the longest-running reality show in history, it’s also one of the first. A new podcast,
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N.E.A. Jazz Masters Include Roscoe Mitchell and Dorthaan Kirk 22 May 2019, 10:07pm Updated N.E.A. Jazz Masters Include Roscoe Mitchell and Dorthaan Kirk
Reggie Workman and Bobby McFerrin round out the National Endowment for the Arts’s class of 2020.
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The National Was Stalled. Two Outsiders Got the Band Moving Again. 22 May 2019, 10:01pm Updated The National Was Stalled. Two Outsiders Got the Band Moving Again.
The New York group was ready for a break when the director Mike Mills asked to collaborate. Contributions from Carin Besser, its lead singer’s wife, provided the spark.
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BBC National Orchestra director Michael Garvey steps down 22 May 2019, 3:03pm BBC National Orchestra director Michael Garvey steps down
Michael Garvey was in the role for six years and has been a "real innovator", BBC Wales' director says.
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Best of Late Night: Seth Meyers Says Trump’s Iran Threats Are a Good Case for More Golf 21 May 2019, 2:46am Best of Late Night: Seth Meyers Says Trump’s Iran Threats Are a Good Case for More Golf
It’s a matter of national security to keep President Trump golfing, Meyers said. “Otherwise, he’ll spend his time threatening to start wars on Twitter.”
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Cecil Beaton exhibition to put spotlight on bright young things 20 May 2019, 10:27am Cecil Beaton exhibition to put spotlight on bright young things
Glittering cast of 1920s and 30s bohemians will be subject of National Portrait Gallery show The wild and hedonistic world of the
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National Audit Office questions value of Stonehenge tunnel 20 May 2019, 9:29am National Audit Office questions value of Stonehenge tunnel
Report by watchdog casts doubt on Highways England figures for £2bn project Risks and uncertainty surround the government’s plan to build a tunnel beneath the Stonehenge world heritage site, the National Audit Office has concluded. A
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The big picture: national pride flourishes amid war in Ukraine 19 May 2019, 1:59am The big picture: national pride flourishes amid war in Ukraine
Mark Neville captures a moment full of symbolism on the fringes of the conflict in DonbassOver the past three years, London-based photographer
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Wired up: East Berlin thriller makes National Theatre a surveillance centre 16 May 2019, 5:07am Wired up: East Berlin thriller makes National Theatre a surveillance centre
Ella Hickson’s radical new play asks its audience to spy on the lives of a nation gripped by revolutionary promise The National Theatre’s Dorfman stage is to be transformed into a gigantic surveillance centre for
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The £3.6m masterpiece hanging in our school 15 May 2019, 7:11am The £3.6m masterpiece hanging in our school
A 17th Century painting owned by the National Gallery is on a tour of unusual venues around the UK.
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‘Empire’ Season 6 Will Be the Show’s Last 13 May 2019, 2:02pm ‘Empire’ Season 6 Will Be the Show’s Last
In a surprise announcement Monday, Fox said the show would end after its next season, months after Jussie Smollett was at the center of a national controversy.
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13 May 2019, 12:19pm Updated Venice Biennale’s Top Prize Goes to Lithuania
“Sun & Sea (Marina),” which features opera singers on an artificial beach, was the second successive performance piece to win the Golden Lion for best national participation.
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‘Empire’ to End After Next Season 13 May 2019, 9:00am ‘Empire’ to End After Next Season
In a surprise announcement Monday, Fox said the show’s sixth season would be its last, months after Jussie Smollett was at the center of a national controversy.
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Mawkish monuments and the beach from hell: our verdict on the Venice Biennale 12 May 2019, 11:42am Mawkish monuments and the beach from hell: our verdict on the Venice Biennale
It has dancing monsters, a smoking pigeon and a ship full of migrants that sank. But this year’s haunting, standout show is Lithuania’s beach full of doomed sunbathers A black and white cow travels in endless circles on a circular track, going nowhere on a carpet of artificial grass. Chinese artist Nabuqi’s bovine installation is far from the most stupid and unnecessary thing you’ll find in this year’s Venice Biennale, which sprawls across the city, from the Giardini to the Arsenale, from the national pavilions to the dockyard warehouses, from the museums and churches to the palaces on the canals. Dumb art for dumb times, then. Belgium’s pavilion is filled with animatronic figures, folkloric weavers, a baker rolling pastry, a tinkling pianist, a beggar quivering with the cold and other assorted personages going through their dismal mechanical motions. Some are locked behind bars, as though the pavilion, and perhaps the country itself, were a 19th-century asylum. Its German counterpart looks half-finished, a ruin in the making, one huge wall a concrete dam that appears about to break. Echoing
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Lily Parr, trailblazing 1920s footballer, to be honoured with statue 10 May 2019, 9:10am Lily Parr, trailblazing 1920s footballer, to be honoured with statue
First prominent public sculpture of a female footballer will be unveiled in Manchester in June More than a century after the first women’s football match and 110 statues of male players, the first prominent public sculpture of a female footballer will be unveiled next month. A life-size statue of Lily Parr, the trailblazing, chain-smoking, goal-scoring winger of the 1920s and 30s, will be erected outside Manchester’s National Football Museum in June.
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Nonfiction: Inside the Elite World of National Spelling Bee Competitors 5 May 2019, 5:00am Nonfiction: Inside the Elite World of National Spelling Bee Competitors
Shalini Shankar’s “Beeline” explores the stakes of these intense, “brain-sport” championships on Generation Z.
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Woman at War review – the mother of all green goddesses 5 May 2019, 3:00am Woman at War review – the mother of all green goddesses
Halldóra Geirharðsdóttir is brilliant in this jet-black comedy about a woman fighting to save the planet and adopt a child at the same time To describe Benedikt Erlingsson’s sense of humour as “dry” is a bit like saying that things can get “chilly” as we get up towards the Arctic circle. Having conquered the theatre stages and TV screens of Iceland as a writer, director and performer, Erlingsson turned to feature films in 2013, where his brand of deadpan tragicomic humour once again struck a national nerve. His directorial feature debut,
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3 May 2019, 1:00pm Updated Doreen Spooner, Trailblazer on Fleet Street, Dies at 91
Recognized as the first woman to become a full-time photographer on a British national newspaper, she earned her male colleagues’ respect “just by getting on with my job.”
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Upheaval by Jared Diamond review – how nations cope with crisis 1 May 2019, 2:29am Upheaval by Jared Diamond review – how nations cope with crisis
Nativism, complacency, suspicion of neighbours … this timely study warns that democracy is fragile Jared Diamond has won renown as a polymath of incredible versatility: a biologist, geographer, linguist and historian. While his environmental approach to big-picture history is suggestive of cool, white-lab-coated detachment, Diamond also wears the mantle of a modern day prophet. Only the most obtuse reader of his latest book, on national resilience, could miss the signs and portents with which it is studded. Diamond’s analysis of the ways in which half a dozen modern countries that he knows well – Finland, Chile, Indonesia, Japan, Germany and Australia – have coped with crises, is shot through with reflections on the fragility of democracy. It explores the imperatives of taking responsibility (without scapegoating), honest national self-appraisal, a willingness to learn from other nations and a capacity to compromise, sometimes, indeed, to swallow the unpalatable.
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Polish protest after gallery removes suggestive banana art 29 Apr 2019, 11:27am Polish protest after gallery removes suggestive banana art
Social media users protest against removing a suggestive artwork from Poland's national gallery.
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Rapping for change in South Africa 28 Apr 2019, 7:01pm Rapping for change in South Africa
Rappers discuss reasons for voter apathy as South Africa goes to the polls in national election next month.
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25 Apr 2019, 7:02pm Updated Critic’s Pick: ‘Be Natural’ Review: Rescuing Alice Guy Blaché, a Film Pioneer, From Oblivion
This lively documentary shows how a founder of two national cinemas — director, producer and studio boss — was almost forgotten.
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Cliques, clubs and cults: the treacherous allure of belonging | sarah henstra 25 Apr 2019, 5:01am Cliques, clubs and cults: the treacherous allure of belonging | sarah henstra
Whether it is a social movement or a secret society, humans love to be part of something bigger than ourselves. Novelist Sarah Henstra looks at what we gain from group identity – and what we lose Two years ago, I drove eight hours south from Toronto with two friends to participate in the Women’s March on Washington DC. That night we hand-lettered our posters (“This pussy grabs back!”) and stitched up the final seams of our pink knitted hats. In the morning, as we descended an escalator to a subway platform awash in pink, we soon realised the march was way too big – 500,000 people – to take its planned route along the National Mall. It was too big to march at all; instead, for seven hours, we stood packed in, shoulder to shoulder, chanting and cheering and straining to hear the speeches from the stage. In some respects, it was the most exciting day of my life. Borne along by the crowd, I felt incredibly powerful; I felt my voice mattered, that my concerns were recognised and shared and my actions were making a difference in the world. I felt lucky to be part of something so massive and important. I was wholly present in the moment:
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23 Apr 2019, 10:25am Updated Tiny Neighborhoods Sprout at the National Building Museum
A collector, David Weingarten, is donating 3,069 shrunken landmarks to the museum.
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Daniel Kramer Quits at English National Opera 18 Apr 2019, 9:02am Updated Daniel Kramer Quits at English National Opera
The company’s artistic director resigned, just two weeks after he announced his second season.
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London Theater Reviews: On the London Stage, ‘Top Girls’ and a Grande Dame 18 Apr 2019, 6:42am Updated London Theater Reviews: On the London Stage, ‘Top Girls’ and a Grande Dame
Maggie Smith tackles an impressive one-woman show at the Bridge Theater, and a British classic of the 1980s gets a new lease on life at the National.
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English National Opera artistic director Daniel Kramer quits 17 Apr 2019, 3:59pm English National Opera artistic director Daniel Kramer quits
Daniel Kramer will leave the role at the end of July in order to focus on directing more theatre and opera.
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Daniel Kramer bows out of ENO. But replacing him will be hard | Andrew Clements 17 Apr 2019, 9:36am Daniel Kramer bows out of ENO. But replacing him will be hard | Andrew Clements
The outgoing English National Opera artistic director leaves with no hits and several misses to his name. Will the board opt for someone with a more extensive track record in opera next time? English National Opera’s announcement on Wednesday that Daniel Kramer is stepping down as artistic director in July,
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Daniel Kramer quits as artistic director of English National Opera 17 Apr 2019, 6:00am Daniel Kramer quits as artistic director of English National Opera
Exclusive: American standing down in summer to concentrate on directing opera and theatre
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Rembrandt review – the life, loves and tragic end of the master painter 9 Apr 2019, 6:00am Rembrandt review – the life, loves and tragic end of the master painter
A look at the artist’s work and life through the lens of the Late Works exhibition that took place in the National Gallery and Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum The 350th anniversary of Rembrandt’s death in 1669 is as good a reason as any to reissue this 2014 gallery film directed by Kat Mansoor, which took its cue
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Humanities Endowment Announces New Grants Amid Old Threats 2 Apr 2019, 2:16pm Humanities Endowment Announces New Grants Amid Old Threats
The National Endowment for the Humanities announced grants supporting 233 projects around the country, two weeks after the latest effort to close the agency.
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The Long Walk Back: play about Chris Lewis has its first night behind bars | Matthew Engel 2 Apr 2019, 8:11am The Long Walk Back: play about Chris Lewis has its first night behind bars | Matthew Engel
Former England all-rounder’s six years in prison are the subject of a new play – one that began its national tour in the confines of HMP Portland It was not the easiest auditorium for the actors. The multi-faith centre was more like a corridor than a conventional theatre, so it required a mighty effort of projection for their voices to reach the back. It was not the easiest audience either. Unused to theatre-going conventions, these playgoers kept up a constant hubbub - not the roars of a football crowd, though very much like the chatter of cricket-watchers. On the plus side, there was little chance of anyone walking out: nearly everyone in the room was a guest of Her Majesty, who takes a stern view of disappearing tricks.
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29 Mar 2019, 2:16pm Updated Newly Discovered Photograph of Harriet Tubman Goes on Display
The photograph, at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, humanizes Tubman and shows her in her youth.
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Qatar National Museum Tells a Country’s Story at Every Turn 28 Mar 2019, 12:17pm Qatar National Museum Tells a Country’s Story at Every Turn
The building designed by the architect Jean Nouvel has been praised worldwide, but its focus is first and foremost a local one, the museum’s chairwoman said.
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Being Frank: The Chris Sievey Story review – tender Frank Sidebottom tribute 27 Mar 2019, 11:30am Being Frank: The Chris Sievey Story review – tender Frank Sidebottom tribute
This documentary about Sievey’s wacky comic creation makes a good case for bestowing posthumous national treasure status It’s appropriate that this absorbing, tender documentary has been driven by a surge of fan loyalty and love. A grassroots
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Art 50: The Sound of Britain review – can art stop the Brexit madness? 25 Mar 2019, 6:30pm Art 50: The Sound of Britain review – can art stop the Brexit madness?
This series of cultural responses to Brexit and national identity kicked off with music and dance – but failed to give us enough of either I guess you might as well use art to try to make sense of Brexit. Nothing else seems to work. Sky Art’s
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The week in theatre: Standing at the Sky’s Edge; Downstate; Richard III – review 23 Mar 2019, 12:00pm The week in theatre: Standing at the Sky’s Edge; Downstate; Richard III – review
Crucible, Sheffield; National Theatre; Alexandra Palace theatre, London
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National Portrait Gallery drops £1m donor 20 Mar 2019, 8:51am Updated National Portrait Gallery drops £1m donor
The Sackler Trust, under scrutiny over money it gets from an addictive opioid drug, withdraws its donation.
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19 Mar 2019, 3:03pm British Gallery Turns Down $1.3 Million Sackler Donation
“I congratulate them on their courage,” said the photographer Nan Goldin, after the National Portrait Gallery said it would not accept a gift from the family, which has links to the opioid crisis.
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National Portrait Gallery drops £1m grant from Sackler family 19 Mar 2019, 2:54pm National Portrait Gallery drops £1m grant from Sackler family
Artist Nan Goldin welcomes move, which comes after firm’s alleged role in US opioid crisis
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National Portrait Gallery turns down £1m grant from Sackler family 19 Mar 2019, 10:09am National Portrait Gallery turns down £1m grant from Sackler family
Artists had asked gallery not to accept sum from family behind firm making opioid OxyContin The National Portrait Gallery has turned down a £1m grant from the multibillionaire Sackler family after an
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Review: A Road Trip Crosses Centuries in ‘Anything That Gives Off Light’ 17 Mar 2019, 3:11pm Updated Review: A Road Trip Crosses Centuries in ‘Anything That Gives Off Light’
This meandering work of musical stand-up theater, from the TEAM and the National Theater of Scotland, probes the past and present of two nations.
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Best of Late Night: Stephen Colbert Taunts Trump Over Senate’s Historic Rebuke 15 Mar 2019, 4:57am Best of Late Night: Stephen Colbert Taunts Trump Over Senate’s Historic Rebuke
After the Senate overturned the president’s declaration of a national emergency at the border, Colbert wryly congratulated him for making history.
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The Missouri Museum That Churchill Built 12 Mar 2019, 11:00am Updated The Missouri Museum That Churchill Built
Churchill’s “Iron Curtain” speech at Westminster College in Fulton, Mo., in 1946 led to America’s National Churchill Museum.
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America faces soul-searching over Michael Jackson 9 Mar 2019, 1:00am America faces soul-searching over Michael Jackson
Jackson is accused of sexually abusing boys, prompting fresh soul-searching in what could be a national reckoning In 1993, Oprah Winfrey visited Michael Jackson at his Neverland ranch for a television special – Jackson’s first interview in 14 years, watched by more than 90 million people worldwide.
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5 Mar 2019, 10:56am Updated What’s on TV Tuesday: ‘The Story of God’ and ‘The Dawn Wall’
Season 3 of Morgan Freeman’s travelogue series returns on National Geographic. And the rock climbing documentary “The Dawn Wall” arrives on Netflix.
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Review: John Adams’s Newest Opera Returns to the Gold Mines 4 Mar 2019, 12:17pm Updated Review: John Adams’s Newest Opera Returns to the Gold Mines
The reception was mixed for the 2017 premiere of “Girls of the Golden West.” Now, with revisions, it has arrived in Europe at the Dutch National Opera.
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Critic’s Notebook: Michael Cohen Depicts a Life More Like ‘The Sopranos’ Than ‘The Apprentice’ 27 Feb 2019, 10:11pm Updated Critic’s Notebook: Michael Cohen Depicts a Life More Like ‘The Sopranos’ Than ‘The Apprentice’
On national TV, President Trump’s old attack dog faced off against his new ones.
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Adia Victoria Wants to Make the Blues Dangerous Again 27 Feb 2019, 5:02pm Updated Adia Victoria Wants to Make the Blues Dangerous Again
The self-dubbed “modern blues woman” collaborated with the National’s Aaron Dessner on “Silences,” an album that takes on love, death, the devil and a woman’s self-determination.
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Simon Godwin: how the British director is ta on US theatre 27 Feb 2019, 3:00am Simon Godwin: how the British director is ta on US theatre
In his new role as artistic director of the Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington DC, the National Theatre and RSC star talks about swapping Brexit for Trump As Donald Trump surged towards a jaw-dropping election victory in late 2016, scholar Stephen Greenblatt
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Ukraine bans its Eurovision entrant over Russia row 26 Feb 2019, 4:58am Ukraine bans its Eurovision entrant over Russia row
Maruv will no longer represent Ukraine after a dispute with the country's national broadcaster.
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Best of Late Night: James Corden Criticizes Trump for National-Emergency Threat 15 Feb 2019, 5:06am Best of Late Night: James Corden Criticizes Trump for National-Emergency Threat
Corden quoted a Trump tweet from 2014 criticizing Barack Obama for subverting the Constitution as president “because he is unable to negotiate with Congress.”
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15 Feb 2019, 5:00am Coming to Chicago: A ‘Giselle’ That Speaks to the Present
Tamara Rojo, of English National Ballet, gambled that a contemporary “Giselle,” with choreography by a ballet outsider, would resonate with audiences.
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A national park with Hollywood history destroyed by fire – before and after 14 Feb 2019, 6:00am A national park with Hollywood history destroyed by fire – before and after
Recent wildfires scorched 90% of the federally protected Santa Monica Mountains – destroying a 1950s Hollywood set and affecting biodiversity. But life is slowly coming back The fire came quickly. Fueled by dry, blustering winds, officials were unable to contain
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Albert Finney obituary 8 Feb 2019, 1:04pm Albert Finney obituary
Actor hailed as the new Olivier but who preferred playing working-class heroes to classical rolesOne of the new-style working-class heroes and shooting stars of the 1960s, the actor Albert Finney, who has died aged 82, enjoyed a rich and varied career that never quite fulfilled its early promise. Like Richard Burton before him and Kenneth Branagh after him, he was expected to become the new Laurence Olivier, the leader of his profession, on stage and on screen. That this never quite happened was no fault of Finney’s. He worked intensely in two periods at the National Theatre, was an active film producer as well as occasional director, and remained a glowering, formidable presence in the movies long after he had been nominated five times for an Oscar (without ever winning). Although a stalwart company member –
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