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Wednesday, September 11, 2019
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Mrs Fletcher review – Kathryn Hahn charms in thought-provoking comedy 11 Sep 5:37pm Mrs Fletcher review – Kathryn Hahn charms in thought-provoking comedy
A HBO series based on Tom Perrotta’s excellent novel about porn and consent offers up wit, intelligence and a remarkable central performance There’s something about the work of the American novelist Tom Perrotta that makes it ideally suited for adaptation, a complex and quite often hugely frustrating process. There are lauded authors, such as Philip Roth, James Joyce and Virginia Woolf, whose books haven’t survived the journey quite so well, time and time again, yet Perrotta has a flawless, if limited, track record. His stinging high school satire Election became one of 1999’s most acclaimed films before the darkly comic suburban drama Little Children brought one of Kate Winslet’s best performances to date and most recently, HBO’s ambitious three-season extension of The Leftovers was met with a rapturous reception.
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Daniel Johnston, cult US indie songwriter, dies aged 58 11 Sep 5:26pm Daniel Johnston, cult US indie songwriter, dies aged 58
Manager confirms Johnston, whose naive songwriting was beloved of Kurt Cobain, died of a heart attack Daniel Johnston, an eccentric, enduring and much beloved figure in the US indie rock scene, has died aged 58 following a heart attack. The news was confirmed by his manager Jeff Tartakov. Numerous cultural figures have paid tribute to the cult songwriter – once a favourite of Kurt Cobain – including Beck, Judd Apatow and Ezra Furman, who described him as “one of my best teachers”. Actor Elijah Wood wrote: “What a gentle, beautiful treasure. So sad to hear you’ve left us.”
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Objekt: the pioneering producer uniting chinstrokers and ravers 11 Sep 8:45am Objekt: the pioneering producer uniting chinstrokers and ravers
TJ Hertz grew up without a clue electronic music existed. Now he’s the genre’s most cutting-edge star – but the studio still gives him the jitters It is 4am on a balmy June night in Barcelona, and on a beachside stage at Primavera Sound festival, one of the finest talents in electronic music is leaping into the unknown. TJ Hertz, AKA Objekt, is one of the most beloved DJs and producers around. His tracks and albums routinely top end-of-year lists in the dance music press; their density and technique pleases the chinstrokers at the back, while their goofiness and fun gets hands in the air down the front. And yet this is his first ever live set, a show he brings to the UK this week. Hertz stands behind a bank of equipment playing crystalline, deconstructed club music and singing through a vocoder while Ezra Miller, a young American visual artist, stands opposite triggering mesmeric visuals in time with the staccato beats and broken melodies.
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Harriet review – Cynthia Erivo is sublime as legendary slave rebel 11 Sep 8:39am Harriet review – Cynthia Erivo is sublime as legendary slave rebel
The remarkable life of freedom fighter Harriet Tubman is told with heart and cinematic craft in Kasi Lemmons stirring biopic History, heroism and leadership are the stuff of Kasi Lemmons’ rousing and heartfelt film about the life and times of Harriet Tubman, the Spartacus of the American south. Cynthia Erivo gives a terrific star performance as Tubman, a slave who suffers from blackouts and religious visions, after being assaulted as a child, which give her a miraculous self-possession and confidence in her own destiny. Erivo embodies Harriet’s courage, resourcefulness, physical toughness, talent (and relish) for disguise and untutored genius for guerrilla warfare. The result falls somewhere between a slave-escape drama, an action thriller, a western and even an unexpected kind of superhero film. It’s a winning combination, although Lemmons does not immerse us in the agony and injustice of slavery as such; she puts together a well-crafted movie that is the showcase for an excellent performance from Erivo.
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Phoenix review – horror comes home in chilly Scandi drama 11 Sep 8:00am Phoenix review – horror comes home in chilly Scandi drama
Daily dread infuses the raw, claustrophobic story of a teenage carer looking after her troubled mother and little brother Norwegian writer-director Camilla Strøm Henriksen’s impressive debut is an intelligent family drama refrigerated with horror-movie chills. Partly autobiographical, it’s the story of teenage carer Jill (Ylva Bjørkaas Thedin), who looks after her little brother and their depressed single mum. This is a family unlikely to show up on the radar of social services: Jill’s mum has had some success in the past as an artist; her dad is a famous jazz musician and rarely around. The claustrophobic first half, with echoes of
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Talking to Strangers by Malcolm Gladwell review – puzzled by banalities 11 Sep 6:00am Talking to Strangers by Malcolm Gladwell review – puzzled by banalities
Are these lessons on ‘the stranger problem’ and how to engage with other people anything more than statements of the obvious? Believe it or not, people aren’t totally transparent to one another. Liars can seem honest, spies can seem loyal, nervous people can seem guilty. People’s facial expressions are not a reliable guide to what they are thinking. Or, to put it in Hamlet’s words, one may smile, and smile, and be a villain. Makes you think, doesn’t it? If any of this is surprising to you, then you are in exalted company, because it also surprises
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Rebels with a cause: the friendship of Britten and Shostakovich 11 Sep 5:11am Rebels with a cause: the friendship of Britten and Shostakovich
The two composers were separated by the Iron Curtain and language but united by their art and their deep admiration for each others’ music. A new bi-cultural orchestra inspired by their friendship pays tribute to their common cause Benjamin Britten and Dmitri Shostakovich knew of each other long before they met in 1960. Shostakovich would certainly have encountered Britten’s name in 1948 when the English composer was among western musicians attacked as “decadent and bourgeois” by the Russian composer Boris Asafiev during the
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Nepal festival celebrates end of monsoon season – in pictures 11 Sep 5:01am Updated Nepal festival celebrates end of monsoon season – in pictures
The annual Infra Jatra festival, named after the god of rain and heaven, is celebrated by worshipping, singing, dancing and feasting in Kathmandu valley
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Bone China by Laura Purcell review – a homage to Du Maurier 11 Sep 4:00am Bone China by Laura Purcell review – a homage to Du Maurier
A Cornish family’s history is shrouded in dark intrigue in a novel packed with melodramatic flourishesLaura Purcell’s new novel is billed as a “Du Maurier-esque chiller”, which may be putting it mildly. We meet Hester Why aboard a mail coach as it lurches through the Cornish night. From Falmouth, she proceeds by pony and trap to her destination, announced in the time-honoured manner by a grizzled driver. “We be on Morvoren land now,” he croaks. We be veering towards outright staginess, too, it must be said. The effect isn’t just Du Maurier-esque; it’s Du Maurier-tastic. Which isn’t a bad thing, necessarily. She could ham it up with the best of them – indeed, she was the best of them – and sometimes readers like to know exactly what they are getting. It’s an approach that has certainly worked for Purcell so far: she won the WHSmith Thumping Good Read award in 2017 for
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The Anarchy by William Dalrymple review – the East India Company and corporate excess 11 Sep 2:30am The Anarchy by William Dalrymple review – the East India Company and corporate excess
Patriotic myths are exploded in a vivid pageturner, which considers the Company as a forerunner of modern multinationals, ‘too big to fail’ About a century ago, a series of giant murals was unveiled in the Palace of Westminster depicting the “
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The masked shoe shiners of Bolivia – in pictures 11 Sep 2:00am The masked shoe shiners of Bolivia – in pictures
On the streets of La Paz, the Bolivian capital, a tribe wearing ski masks go about their work buffing up shoes. The disguises are to keep their identities secret – and avoid discrimination
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Manchester Art Gallery tackles gender gap with female self-portraits 11 Sep 1:00am Manchester Art Gallery tackles gender gap with female self-portraits
Untitled (Red) and In wake donated by Valeria Napoleone, who only collects art by women An art gallery has unveiled two new works in an attempt to address its gender imbalance, where less than 10% of its permanent collection are by women. The self-portraits by the Cape Town-based visual artist Berni Searle have been added to the permanent collection at Manchester Art Gallery, in a move to extend “the discourse around representation and identity”. Untitled (Red) and In wake were donated by the art collector and philanthropist Valeria Napoleone, who only collects art by women, as part of a scheme to redress criticisms of a
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