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Monday, August 12, 2019
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Sue Crockford obituary 12 Aug 2019, 10:14am Sue Crockford obituary
Film director and producer who documented the women’s liberation movement in BritainOn International Women’s Day in 1971, 4,000 women, men and children marched through central London, demanding equal rights and equal pay for women. As a director and producer, Sue Crockford, who has died aged 76, led a team capturing the event:
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Teenage Fanclub: how we made Bandwagonesque 12 Aug 2019, 9:36am Teenage Fanclub: how we made Bandwagonesque
‘I was on the phone to lawyers and labels in New York while still living in a council flat and unable to afford the bus fare to rehearsals’ What was our life like back in 1991? Impoverished! But when you’re young that’s fine. We’d take the mattress out of my bedroom, stick it in the back of a rental van and off we’d go on tour.
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Edinburgh festival 2019: the shows we recommend 12 Aug 2019, 8:40am Edinburgh festival 2019: the shows we recommend
Plan your schedule with our roundup of top shows, ordered by start time. This page will be updated daily throughout the festival
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Not the Booker prize 2019: three more finalists revealed 12 Aug 2019, 8:36am Not the Booker prize 2019: three more finalists revealed
After the public vote last week, our judges and book champions reveal their choices to complete the six-novel field. Let’s start reading! We now have a full size Not the Booker prize shortlist. Following
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The Edinburgh fringe is obsessed with food – so I went and gorged on the best shows 12 Aug 2019, 8:26am The Edinburgh fringe is obsessed with food – so I went and gorged on the best shows
From comedy about carveries to clean-eating rants, food is a huge theme at this year’s festival fringe. The Guardian’s restaurant critic gets stuck in At Valvona & Crolla, a venerable Edinburgh deli dating from 1934, I am eating arancini for breakfast and trying to make sense of the abundance of food-related shows at this year’s fringe. For three days, I’ve plodded rain-drenched backstreets, consuming hours of drama, comedy and performance art about eating. I’ve watched comfort food cabarets and comedy about the Toby Carvery, listened to rants about clean eating and calorific excess and met (albeit figuratively) the young women who tested Hitler’s dinner each evening for poison. There has been immigration-based drama Citizens of Nowhere?, staged in the kitchen of a Novotel hotel, and a Fawlty Towers dining experience where a man with a stick-on moustache and a faux-Spanish accent proffers waldorf salad to fans of the 70s sitcom. In Hold On Let Go, a drama with music by Paul Smith from Maximo Park, bread is baked live on stage. Despite all the walking, I’ve gained extra pounds, having eaten chocolate mousse made by an Australian woman singing Teenage Dream by Katy Perry as she whisked, plus a weirdly delicious chicken caesar salad made in a cement mixer by the anarchist cook George Egg.
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How Jonathan Creek went from geek in a duffel coat to boring besuited businessman 12 Aug 2019, 8:00am How Jonathan Creek went from geek in a duffel coat to boring besuited businessman
Alan Davies solved improbable crimes with wit and flair. Before, erm, getting a job in advertising It probably seems daft to suggest
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Sarah Silverman: I was fired from film after blackface photo resurfaced 12 Aug 2019, 7:27am Sarah Silverman: I was fired from film after blackface photo resurfaced
The comedian says she was let go from a movie project after producers became aware of a 2007 comedy sketch in which she wore blackface
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Inland by Téa Obreht review – the wild west just got wilder 12 Aug 2019, 5:00am Inland by Téa Obreht review – the wild west just got wilder
This exquisite frontier tale from the author of The Tiger’s Wife is a timely exploration of the darkness beneath the American dreamTéa Obreht’s wildly successful first novel,
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Joseph Fiennes: ‘I’ve done my bit for society – I’ve illustrated the patheticness of misogyny’ 12 Aug 2019, 1:00am Joseph Fiennes: ‘I’ve done my bit for society – I’ve illustrated the patheticness of misogyny’
The star of The Handmaid’s Tale says he doesn’t like to equate Donald Trump’s politics with the show. But, he adds, sometimes you just have to point out the blazingly obvious …‘It’s alluded to in the novel … someday, something will happen to Fred. Quite soon.” In a neutral-looking cafe in central London, Joseph Fiennes is talking about the future of his role in The Handmaid’s Tale. “Why, though?” I plead with him. “Why does he have to die?” “It’s in the novel,” Fiennes explains very patiently. “He’s got to. Come on, there are some very angry women in red out there.” When The Handmaid’s Tale first appeared on our screens in 2017, it was a bit like having an anxiety dream about the new politics, your subconscious supplying the sharp contrasts and glorious Technicolor, the brutally formal sexual violence and the intricate dystopian detail. There was a watchful intelligence in all the performances – particularly Elisabeth Moss as June/Offred, Fiennes as Fred and Yvonne Strahovski as Serena, his wife – which was arresting, and left you vaguely unsettled for a long time after each episode.
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