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Sunday, June 16, 2019
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Top Gear review – gentler, kinder and all the better for it 16 Jun 4:00pm Top Gear review – gentler, kinder and all the better for it
With Freddie Flintoff and Paddy McGuinness joining Chris Harris, the banter is barbed but good-natured, the gags less non-PC – and imagine Clarkson and co doing an episode on electric cars? Remind me: where had we got to with Top Gear? Ever since Jeremy Clarkson got sacked for punching that producer – amazingly, more than four years ago – the BBC has struggled to replace, or revive, or reboot the formula that made the show such a storming success. There was the new model with
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Europe or bust: why Laure Prouvost wants us to dig our way out of Brexit 16 Jun 10:00am Europe or bust: why Laure Prouvost wants us to dig our way out of Brexit
Her first impulse was to cover the London underground in breasts – but instead the Turner prize-winner is urging commuters to pick up shovels. We crawled inside her studio to find out more ... You must stoop to access
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This Storm by James Ellroy review – Nazis, orgies and Orson Welles 16 Jun 8:00am This Storm by James Ellroy review – Nazis, orgies and Orson Welles
The latest instalment of the writer’s blood-soaked alternative history of the US rewards the attentiveSet in Los Angeles in 1942, the latest instalment in James Ellroy’s occult saga of US history centres on Irish-born police sergeant Dudley Smith, a closet Nazi using his rank as a front for activities including drug running and people trafficking. In his day job, he’s coordinating a manhunt for a blood-drinking necrophile, Tommy Glennon, though Smith’s real reason for wanting to find him isn’t the obvious one, having more to do with Glennon witnessing what Smith once got up to at a Nazi orgy in the company of Orson Welles.
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Frozen in Time: Sophia Loren, London, June 1960 16 Jun 7:00am Frozen in Time: Sophia Loren, London, June 1960
On the set of The Millionairess, the Italian star blends in with the East End locals and discover the joy of whelks Three sets of diamonds, emeralds and rubies were among the jewels stolen from Sophia Loren as she filmed
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Vivian by Christina Hesselholdt review – flash portrait 16 Jun 6:00am Vivian by Christina Hesselholdt review – flash portrait
This fictionalised account of the secret street photographer Vivian Maier’s life is playful but unfocusedWhen the American photographer
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Lena Headey: ‘I wanted a better death for Cersei’ 16 Jun 4:30am Lena Headey: ‘I wanted a better death for Cersei’
The actor hasn’t stood still since Game of Thrones ended. There’s her short film, her work with refugees – and there’s always another tattoo…Lena Headey has been an actor for the better part of three decades, but the experience has not eased the doubt she has in her abilities. And even near-universal praise of the kind she received for her portrayal of Cersei Lannister in
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10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak review – powerful but preachy 16 Jun 4:00am 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak review – powerful but preachy
The brave political novelist’s story of an Istanbul sex worker and her outcast friends is sensual but frustratingElif Shafak’s ninth novel in English tells the story of a Turkish woman reflecting on her life in the immediate moments after her brutal death. Leila, a fortysomething sex worker in Istanbul, has been murdered and dumped in a wheelie bin in the dark, damp outskirts of the city. But in the 10 minutes and 38 seconds after her heart stops beating, her mind continues to whirr, ranging over her memories, their scents and flavours. The novel, which opens in 1990, is not only a sensual journey into the complicated life of a prostitute known as “Tequila Leila” but the story of her cherished friends – five social outcasts who are also considered trash in an increasingly illiberal country. Shafak wants to give a voice to society’s untouchables: immigrants, underdogs and those who are considered freaks by their own families. “The Istanbul that Leila had known was not the Istanbul that the Ministry of Tourism would have wanted foreigners to see,” she writes.
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How indie bookshops are fighting back 16 Jun 3:30am How indie bookshops are fighting back
Independent bookshops are thriving because they understand readers’ tastes better than an Amazon algorithmAs global temperatures rise at the rate political standards fall, the news that independent bookshops are reviving gives rare cause for celebration. Last year the number of indies on UK high streets grew for the second year running – by 15 to 883, according to the
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The Pope review – crisis at the heart of Catholicism 16 Jun 3:00am The Pope review – crisis at the heart of Catholicism
Royal & Derngate, Northampton
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Fred Hersch & the WDR Big Band: Begin Again review – lyrical and terrifying 16 Jun 3:00am Fred Hersch & the WDR Big Band: Begin Again review – lyrical and terrifying
(Palmetto) When the conversation turns to contemporary jazz pianists, the name of
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Sometime Always Never review – a triple-word score of a movie 16 Jun 3:00am Sometime Always Never review – a triple-word score of a movie
Bill Nighy is a Scrabble-obsessed father grieving for a missing son in Frank Cottrell Boyce’s offbeat gem The presence of Bill Nighy, funeral-faced national treasure, will no doubt be a key selling point for this tragicomic drama. But the real star is behind the scenes. Screenwriter Frank Cottrell Boyce, who adapted the film from his own short story, has crafted a joy of a script, which seeds its themes as elegantly as Nighy’s character, Alan, a Scrabble-obsessed tailor, wears his suits. The danger of an offbeat British film, particularly one that is as emphatically designed as this, is that it could teeter into whimsy and artifice. But thanks to Cottrell Boyce, and the assured direction of first-time feature film-maker Carl Hunter, the emotional beats are authentic and the distinctive look of the film – it takes its aesthetic cues from 60s ties and 70s wallpaper – never upstages the story. Alan has spent his life preoccupied with the disappearance of his favourite son years before. Michael stormed out of the family home in a “nark” after a disagreement over a Scrabble game. The remaining son, Peter, (Sam Riley) has found himself measured against an absent rival in a competition he can never win. A childhood defined by “second best” – he played with Chad Valley Big League rather than Subbuteo – has shaped his adult life. The precision in the shot composition is mirrored in the storytelling – there’s an unassuming elegance that balances the eccentricity of a film that makes something as mundane as Scrabble into a taut dramatic device.
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The week in TV: The Handmaid’s Tale, Big Little Lies and more – review 16 Jun 2:00am The week in TV: The Handmaid’s Tale, Big Little Lies and more – review
Elisabeth Moss blazes back to Gilead, Meryl Streep joins Big Little Lies, and the Women’s World Cup lays claim to the beautiful game
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The week in radio and podcasts: Gangster Capitalism: C13 Originals; Living Memory 16 Jun 2:00am The week in radio and podcasts: Gangster Capitalism: C13 Originals; Living Memory
Andrew Jenks has produced an investigation into America’s college admissions scandal in impressive time. Plus the world’s brightest centenarians
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Oscar Murillo: ‘I want to hold up a mirror to this country’ 16 Jun 2:00am Oscar Murillo: ‘I want to hold up a mirror to this country’
The Turner prize nominee on socially engaged art, his Colombian heritage and why his family is part of his new Art Night show ‘Art and life – there is no separation between the two,” Oscar Murillo says. It is a line that stays in the mind although it is thrown out casually, part of a longer conversation. What is clear is that Murillo’s life is jammed with work to the point where art and life have become almost indistinguishable. He has a solo exhibition,
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My Seditious Heart by Arundhati Roy review – powerful, damning essays 16 Jun 2:00am My Seditious Heart by Arundhati Roy review – powerful, damning essays
The Booker-winning Indian author casts an exacting eye over inequality, gender politics and imperialism With its gold-striped spine, crimson endpapers and silky leaves,
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TV tonight: petrolheads assemble ... Top Gear is back 16 Jun 1:00am TV tonight: petrolheads assemble ... Top Gear is back
Andrew Flintoff and Paddy McGuinness join Chris Harris for a new incarnation of the motoring show. Plus it’s a Good Morning Britain grudge match in this year’s Soccer Aid. Here’s the evening’s best TV
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