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Tuesday, June 11, 2019
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Killing Eve season two: is it as bad as everyone is saying? 11 Jun 1:08pm Killing Eve season two: is it as bad as everyone is saying?
The new series following a sociopathic assassin is catching some flak online, with the lack of Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s writing being blamed for a drop in quality. Which is understandable, if unfair This weekend, 3.7 million people tuned in to watch the return of Bafta-winning BBC drama Killing Eve, as
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Which film have you seen multiple times at the cinema? 11 Jun 11:28am Which film have you seen multiple times at the cinema?
An Avengers superfan claims to have seen Endgame 110 times since it was released – is there a film that kept you coming back? In the six weeks since the release of
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Cat lovers question ethics of Nicole Kidman hiking with pets in backpack 11 Jun 11:18am Cat lovers question ethics of Nicole Kidman hiking with pets in backpack
The actor’s revelations that she often goes for walks toting cats – and that she ate ants – have been met with scepticism by animal rights groups Whether looking out of a window, reclining beneath a Christmas tree or sitting in a suitcase, Nicole Kidman’s pet cats are frequently the star of her Instagram page. The actor’s affection for Ginger and Snow has extended to
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All aboard the Bob Dylan express! How Rolling Thunder revved round America 11 Jun 10:26am All aboard the Bob Dylan express! How Rolling Thunder revved round America
When Dylan chanced upon a huge Roma gathering in France, he was transfixed – and formed his own travelling supergroup. As Martin Scorsese bring its ragtag magic to screens, we hitch a ride back to ’75 In May 1975, his marriage breaking up, Bob Dylan spent six weeks in the south of France. His host, an artist named David Oppenheim, had recently provided a painting for the back cover of Blood on the Tracks, an album of seemingly confessional songs that had taken Dylan back to the top of the charts. Critics acclaimed its songs as evidence that, after almost a decade of straying from the straight and narrow, he was prepared once again to bare his soul. But Dylan, as usual, was restless. A year earlier he had toured for the first time since his
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Penguin rebuts charge of antisemitism against author Pedro Baños 11 Jun 9:01am Penguin rebuts charge of antisemitism against author Pedro Baños
Publisher’s review of How They Rule the World, accused of prejudice in its coverage of the Rothschilds, finds book ‘robust’ but not antisemitic Penguin has undertaken a “thorough” review of one of its books, Spanish colonel Pedro Baños’s How They Rule the World, after allegations of antisemitism were made against its author. The publisher concluded that while Baños’s views are “robust”, they are not antisemitic. How They Rule the World, which promises to reveal “the 22 secret strategies of global power”, was published by Penguin Random House imprint Ebury Press in April. Author Jeremy Duns
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Radiohead release hours of hacked MiniDiscs to benefit Extinction Rebellion 11 Jun 8:50am Radiohead release hours of hacked MiniDiscs to benefit Extinction Rebellion
Thom Yorke describes hours of recordings from OK Computer sessions as ‘not v interesting’, while climate activists thank the band for ‘unprecedented support’ Radiohead have released a vast collection of unreleased tracks made during the sessions for 1997 album
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Samoa bans Elton John biopic Rocketman over gay scenes 11 Jun 8:17am Samoa bans Elton John biopic Rocketman over gay scenes
Pacific nation’s censor says homosexual activity depicted on screen violates its laws The Pacific nation of
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Rob Lowe, bobby on the beat? The US A-listers who ended up on British TV 11 Jun 7:12am Rob Lowe, bobby on the beat? The US A-listers who ended up on British TV
The West Wing star has a new role as a hard-bitten Miami cop decamping to Lincolnshire, in ITV drama Wild Bill. But he’s not the first American to make the unlikely transatlantic move US television is packed with British actors. They are easy to spot because they’re cheap and classy, and their accents aren’t quite specific enough to convince. But it’s much less common to find American actors on British TV, which makes ITV’s new
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Nancy Meyers: focusing on my movie kitchens is sexist 11 Jun 6:25am Nancy Meyers: focusing on my movie kitchens is sexist
Director of It’s Complicated and Something’s Gotta Give says male directors who make ‘gorgeous’ films don’t face similar criticism Nancy Meyers, the multimillion-dollar grossing
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I can go for that: five essential yacht rock classics 11 Jun 5:00am I can go for that: five essential yacht rock classics
Katie Puckrick’s new TV doc reappraises the smooth, sad and seedy side of the maligned genre. Here she reveals the best tracks
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Words from the Wall by Adam Thorpe review – beauty in the bleak 11 Jun 4:00am Words from the Wall by Adam Thorpe review – beauty in the bleak
Adam Thorpe ranges from ancient Rome to his mother’s last days in a collection rich in language and dark in toneAdam Thorpe is a longsighted poet, at home with the ancient and the modern, and with an extraordinary field of vision. In this first-class collection – which repays rereading – he turns a searchlight back to the ice age (in Bolzano, Italy) and to ancient Rome (where he walks in the shoes of Suetonius) and looks back, too, at the English language. In Lingua Franca, he relishes Anglo-Saxon roots – language as a vehicle for history: “The frost and fog of Danelaw, its oafs and their knives / staggered from; the Saxon hog snuffling in its barn, / dung-daggled, furrowing through acorns / in the winter wood. And ice, yonder.” He reminds us that contemporary speech is made up of souvenirs: “Every time we open our mouths / it rushes out in a skein of colour: / entwined ghosts.” He describes himself as a ‘blithe scrivener” but must intend this ironically, for his poems are undeceived and sometimes bleak, even though pepped up by his wry wit. If the English language is blighted as “slaughterers pound up the sand”, the English countryside is being similarly blasted, its meadows “silenced of their quivering lyra, / the tiny throats bunged with whiffs / of cancer and formaldehyde.” Nature is victim to a “chemical sacerdotage”. (sacerdotage is, I guess, his coinage – the “dotage” appropriate in context).
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A zinging rainbow made of drainage pipes: inside the Dulwich Pavilion 11 Jun 3:00am A zinging rainbow made of drainage pipes: inside the Dulwich Pavilion
Sitting on chubby red legs, the Dulwich Pavilion is seeking to rival the Serpentine’s, thanks to this dizzying Colour Palace inspired by swirling fabric markets in Lagos Red makes the heart beat faster, say the colour theorists and marketers, while yellow brings a sunny splash of happiness. Blue is a wave of serenity, orange a burst of energy, green a spark of fresh fertility, and pink a flash of excitement. You’ll feel an explosion of all these things, and more, when you encounter the
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