Back The Guardian Friday, May 24, 2019
Search Sections 24 May

The Guardian

Friday, May 24, 2019
Close
Advertisement
Flawed, foul-mouthed and funny: how cerebral palsy became TV comedy gold 24 May 1:16pm Flawed, foul-mouthed and funny: how cerebral palsy became TV comedy gold
From the riotous office humour of Jerk to the satirical genius of Special, TV is finally embracing characters with cerebral palsy. We ask the stars of this new wave: is this a watershed moment? ‘It took years to convince someone to make this show,” says Ryan O’Connell. “First of all, my book flopped and sold two copies.” Called I’m Special: And Other Lies We Tell Ourselves, the book was a moving and hilarious account of something he had been hiding in the popular blogs he had written about his life as a gay millennial. Like 17 million other people around the world, O’Connell has
 Like Reply
Follow the Bird Lady! Cinderella costume parade – in pictures 24 May 12:06pm Follow the Bird Lady! Cinderella costume parade – in pictures
Christopher Wheeldon is bringing his in-the-round Cinderella ballet to the Royal Albert Hall in London, complete with 370 costumes. We went behind the scenes for English National Ballet’s final preparations
 Like Reply
Watched plots … Hilary Mantel and the writers under pressure from fans 24 May 11:04am Watched plots … Hilary Mantel and the writers under pressure from fans
With the Wolf Hall novelist set to finish her trilogy in 2020, Philip Pullman, Anne Rice and others discuss how expectations can affect the creative process Philip Pullman waited 17 years before allowing readers back into the world of Lyra Belacqua, Joseph Heller took 33 to return to Catch-22, and George RR Martin is still keeping fans hanging for his version of the final struggle for the Iron Throne. The eight years readers have been waiting since the second volume of Hilary Mantel’s Thomas Cromwell trilogy may not seem much in comparison. But for Mantel, they have been the most demanding years of her career. The first part of Mantel’s tale of Cromwell at the court of Henry VIII, Wolf Hall, appeared in 2009, winning her the Booker prize and catapulting her to global bestseller status. Bring Up the Bodies followed in 2012, netting her a second Booker and taking worldwide sales for the series above 5m copies. The concluding volume, The Mirror and the Light, was originally expected in 2014. But the novel has been repeatedly delayed, and Mantel has spoken about the pressure she has felt to get it right. “The third book is particularly taxing, it needs all my ingenuity,”
 Like Reply
Lady Chatterley trial: thousands raised to keep judge’s copy in UK 24 May 9:27am Lady Chatterley trial: thousands raised to keep judge’s copy in UK
After an export bar was placed on the copy of DH Lawrence’s novel used in court, readers, writers and publishers have joined drive to save it for the nation A crowdfunding appeal is bringing readers, authors and publishers together to help keep the copy of Lady Chatterley’s Lover used by the judge in the landmark obscenity trial in the UK. The annotated copy was
 Like Reply
Lust in translation: France makes its own version of Fleabag 24 May 9:01am Lust in translation: France makes its own version of Fleabag
Adaptation set in Paris follows Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s hit series almost scene for scene France so loved Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s hit series Fleabag that it has made its own version, about the life of a woman called
 Like Reply
Reading and Leeds, Latitude, Download and Wireless festivals to go plastic-free 24 May 7:20am Reading and Leeds, Latitude, Download and Wireless festivals to go plastic-free
Global promoter Live Nation pledges to eliminate single-use plastics from festivals and venues by 2021 The British
 Like Reply
Tayari Jones: ‘I can divide my life into before and after Morrison’s Beloved’ 24 May 5:00am Tayari Jones: ‘I can divide my life into before and after Morrison’s Beloved’
The novelist on a 1940s bestseller that deserves wider attention and how the ancient Greeks have inspired her work
 Like Reply
Neil Gaiman: ‘Good Omens feels more apt now than it did 30 years ago’ 24 May 4:00am Neil Gaiman: ‘Good Omens feels more apt now than it did 30 years ago’
Before Terry Pratchett died, Gaiman told his friend he would adapt their novel about an angel and a devil stopping the apocalypse. As Good Omens starts on TV, he discusses fame, politics and honouring that promise You’d never know from watching
 Like Reply
Frankissstein by Jeanette Winterson review – a dazzling reanimation of Shelley’s novel 24 May 4:00am Frankissstein by Jeanette Winterson review – a dazzling reanimation of Shelley’s novel
Hard science and dreamy Romanticism combine in a meditation on the responsibilities of creation and the possibilities of AI
 Like Reply
How do you write a play about the climate crisis? 24 May 3:00am How do you write a play about the climate crisis?
As part of a new initiative, playwright Bess Wohl was tasked with writing a play about climate crisis, a daunting proposition that’s morphed into the off-Broadway drama Continuity Time. Comedic timing. The freezing of time. How much time humanity has left before certain catastrophe. In Continuity, the new off-Broadway play from the award-winning playwright Bess Wohl and Tony-nominated director Rachel Chavkin, time is the central theme, affecting each character in different ways. Told through the frame of a Hollywood film set, the play tackles how humans are supposed to deal with the magnitude of climate crisis, even as their lives become weighed down with personal drama.
 Like Reply
LEL by Lucasta Miller review – the scandalous death of a popular poet 24 May 2:30am LEL by Lucasta Miller review – the scandalous death of a popular poet
Did a love affair lead to the demise of Letitia Elizabeth Landon, one of the most famous and most exploited poets in early 19th-century Britain ? In 1838 the newly married wife of the governor of Cape Coast Castle in West Africa was found dead in her room, having apparently poisoned herself. You can see why she might have been feeling defeated. George Maclean, responsible for keeping the peace in a large stretch of what is modern-day Ghana, had turned out to be a dour bully with a “country wife” and family already in residence. Then there was the melancholy discovery that, despite slavery being illegal, the fortress over which the new Mrs Maclean was expected to preside was kept shipshape by black “prisoners” guarded by soldiers with bayonets. Finally, there was the tropical climate, which spoiled everything: “Keys, scissors, everything rusts,” the 36-year-old bride wrote home miserably to her mother. In the normal run of events the sad news of Mrs Maclean’s death would have warranted a short paragraph in the Times and a tactful side-stepping of whether this was actually suicide or an accidental overdose. But Mrs Maclean was not simply a disillusioned last-chance bride abandoned in a rotten corner of the burgeoning British empire. In her former life, as Letitia Landon, or rather LEL, she had been the most famous poet in Britain. For almost two decades she had spewed out – and sometimes it really did feel like an involuntary hurl – poetry that managed to be mawkish and sensational, coy and fruity. In poems – or songs as she liked to call them – with such titles as “The Fate of Adelaide” and “Romance and Reality”, LEL gushed tales of female passion and social ruin, all sufficiently coded so that nice girls could get away with reading them.
 Like Reply
How does the reality TV show Cops stack up with real-life crime figures? 24 May 1:00am How does the reality TV show Cops stack up with real-life crime figures?
Creators of podcast Running from Cops watched 846 episodes and compared the numbers they found with national crime figures Reality TV can fail to live up to its name, conveying a version of the world that is a sidestep from the truth. And Cops was a show that was crucial to the genre – it’s not only the longest-running reality show in history, it’s also one of the first. A new podcast,
 Like Reply
Rocketmen, raves and rhapsodies: how the music biopic became a Hollywood hit 24 May 1:00am Rocketmen, raves and rhapsodies: how the music biopic became a Hollywood hit
Elton John is the latest rock star to get the movie treatment in Rocketman. When did singers become as bankable as superheroes at the box office? The doors swing open and through the smoke swaggers a figure in bejewelled orange horns, gold popped collar and fiery plumage. The Avengers have fought their last battle, and this summer’s superhero has arrived: his name is Elton John (or Taron Egerton) and his superpower is – Hollywood hopes – getting bums on seats in a projected $25m opening weekend. In the opening scene of the biopic
 Like Reply
On the top

Date settings

Today is Sunday, September 15, 2019

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept