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Thursday, May 23, 2019
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Bittersweet no more: Rolling Stones pass Verve royalties to Richard Ashcroft 23 May 12:58pm Bittersweet no more: Rolling Stones pass Verve royalties to Richard Ashcroft
An acrimonious copyright dispute meant Ashcroft was forced to give up royalties to Bitter Sweet Symphony, but a ‘kind and magnanimous gesture from Mick and Keith’ passes rights to him Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones have ended one of the most acrimonious copyright disputes in British pop history, by granting Richard Ashcroft all future royalties from his 1997 song Bitter Sweet Symphony, performed by the Verve. Ashcroft announced the news on the same day he won an Ivor Novello award for outstanding contribution to British music. In a statement he said:
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Dogs, a horse and a goat go to the polls – in pictures 23 May 12:21pm Dogs, a horse and a goat go to the polls – in pictures
Pets accompany their owners across the UK as the nation votes in the European elections This article was amended on 23 May 2019 to remove an image, which the photo agency informed us after publication was taken at the local elections in the UK in May, not at the European elections.
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The Secret Life of Pets 2 review – return of the funny furry friends 23 May 12:00pm The Secret Life of Pets 2 review – return of the funny furry friends
In this wittier and less frenetic family animation, the arrival of a newborn baby overturns the world of pampered pooch Max In 2016, the team behind
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The 1975 win two major awards at 2019 Ivor Novellos 23 May 11:30am The 1975 win two major awards at 2019 Ivor Novellos
Pop-rock band win songwriters of the year and best contemporary song, with Ben Howard and Idles collecting other big prizes The 1975 have received two of the most prestigious prizes at this year’s
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Booksmart star Beanie Feldstein: ‘Everyone said we didn’t belong in LA’ 23 May 10:48am Booksmart star Beanie Feldstein: ‘Everyone said we didn’t belong in LA’
She was Lady Bird’s best friend and her brother Jonah Hill got a tattoo in her honour – meet the sparky star of this summer’s wildest high school comedy Beanie Feldstein is eating ice-cream in a red dress that is as bright as strawberry sauce. “This is one of the coolest things I’ve ever worn?” she says, her inflection rising at the end, as it often does, lending even her most confident assertions an equivocal note. The 25-year-old star of
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Terminator: Dark Fate trailer – first footage released online 23 May 9:02am Terminator: Dark Fate trailer – first footage released online
The sixth Terminator film, which brings back Linda Hamilton and Arnold Schwarzenegger, is produced by James Cameron The first teaser trailer for Terminator: Dark Fate has been released online. This is the sixth film in the Terminator series, which began in 1984 with the James Cameron-directed The Terminator. Dark Fate has been pitched as a sequel to Terminator 2: Judgment Day, thereby ignoring all four subsequent films, including the most recent, Terminator: Genysis, released in 2015.
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Dog weepie movies – ranked! 23 May 8:57am Dog weepie movies – ranked!
With mutts all over our screens in John Wick 3, A Dog’s Journey, Paw Patrol and more, which of film’s furry friends can melt the most hearts? Russian mobsters kill Daisy, the beagle puppy left to John Wick by his late wife. The sadness of the puppy death is offset by Wick going on to kill everyone who had anything to do with it, which makes you feel better.
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‘The stories are a bit sinister’: the secrets of London’s hidden rivers revealed 23 May 7:51am ‘The stories are a bit sinister’: the secrets of London’s hidden rivers revealed
Exhibition including skulls, weapons and toilet seats recovered from unseen waterways beneath Londoners’ feet gives new insight into city’s history Whenever a gap appears in the traffic roaring past the new Bloomberg building in the City of London, it is just possible to make out a little hump in the road where Cannon Street and Walbrook meet. As busy a junction now as it was 2,000 years ago, it is also one of the spots where the long buried past almost breaks through the skin of the modern city. The history of London’s secret rivers is being celebrated in a
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The Phantom Menace at 20: was the infamous prequel actually that bad? 23 May 6:57am The Phantom Menace at 20: was the infamous prequel actually that bad?
It’s 20 years since George Lucas outraged fans, derailed careers and introduced us to Jar Jar Binks. Is it time to forgive him? It is hard to believe that
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Asbury Park: Riot, Redemption, Rock’n’Roll review – not Bossing it 23 May 6:00am Asbury Park: Riot, Redemption, Rock’n’Roll review – not Bossing it
A minor bit of Bruce Springsteenology, halfway between a televisual ‘classic albums’ episode and a presentation from the Asbury Park, NJ, Chamber of Commerce The coastal New Jersey enclave of Asbury Park was pinned firmly to the pop-cultural map upon the release of Bruce Springsteen’s debut album Greetings from Asbury Park, NJ, in 1973. Frontloaded with testimony from Springsteen himself, in his role as rock’s plain-spoken elder statesman, this documentary from director Tom Jones (not that one) does a haphazard job of digging around the region in a bid to uncover how his sound – and a wider Asbury scene – emerged. Trailing some distance behind the 2016 autobiography
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Judith Kerr, beloved author of The Tiger Who Came to Tea, dies aged 95 23 May 5:29am Judith Kerr, beloved author of The Tiger Who Came to Tea, dies aged 95
Author and illustrator of more than 30 books, including the Mog series based on her pet cats, arrived in England in 1936 as a refugee from the Nazis
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Common People review – a valuable anthology of working-class writers 23 May 5:00am Common People review – a valuable anthology of working-class writers
Edited by Kit de Waal, these essays, memoirs, stories and poems from established and new writers come straight from the heartThis important collection brings together 34 working-class writers “in celebration, not apology”. There are essays, memoirs, stories and poetry, and most come from the heart. Louise Doughty tells of her aspirational, hard-working father, who left school at 13 and thought ITV and blue jeans were common. Stuart Maconie returns to his childhood home and recalls night-time football, slow-cooked steak and housing projects that almost lived up to their grandly utopian aims. Previously unpublished writers also shine. Astra Bloom’s tale of a girl’s bittersweet moment of glory after she wins a writing competition is touching and beautifully told. Loretta Ramkissoon anchors her reminiscence around a tower block’s shared lifts, whose cold interiors nurture community spirit, decades of small talk building into something special as the floors rush by.
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Daniel Craig to have surgery on ankle injured while filming Bond 25 23 May 4:54am Daniel Craig to have surgery on ankle injured while filming Bond 25
Producers say April 2020 release date will be unaffected by recovering star’s two-week absence from shooting Daniel Craig requires surgery on an ankle he injured during the filming of the new James Bond film, putting him out of action for at least two weeks. The official James Bond social media account announced the news, saying production would continue while Craig “rehabilitates”.
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Dreams becomes reality: the game that can make an artist out of anyone 23 May 4:00am Dreams becomes reality: the game that can make an artist out of anyone
Digital artist Dan Hett explores the Dreamiverse, a galaxy of games, music, art and ideas created by players in a limitless virtual art studio As a digital artist and experimental games designer, I was one of the first in line to dive into Dreams – a PlayStation 4 game that aims to give everyone the ability to unlock the potential artist within – when the developer Media Molecule opened up
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The Perfection review – gory Netflix horror offers imperfect intrigue 23 May 3:00am The Perfection review – gory Netflix horror offers imperfect intrigue
Get Out’s Allison Williams plays a mysterious cellist in an intermittently alluring yet flatly directed B-movie that tries too hard to shock In Netflix-acquired curio The Perfection, confusion reigns. As viewers, we’re wrongfooted both by the film’s twisting plot and its genre, oscillating between body horror, psychological thriller and a drama about mental health. There’s a rare unpredictability that initially proves alluring, at least until that confusion starts to feel less intentional.
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A Thousand Ships by Natalie Haynes review – women of the Trojan war 23 May 2:30am A Thousand Ships by Natalie Haynes review – women of the Trojan war
The latest novel to retell Greek epic from the women’s point of view is a panoramic portrait of the true cost of conflictHomer’s
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Too Late to Die Young review – misty tale of a changing Chile 23 May 2:00am Too Late to Die Young review – misty tale of a changing Chile
A teenager seeks to escape from her remote commune just after the fall of Pinochet in this atmospheric but elusive drama History provided a resplendent context for simple domestic events in last year’s Latin American standout
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