Back The Guardian Thursday, October 12, 2017
Search Sections 12 Oct

The Guardian

Thursday, October 12, 2017
Close
Advertisement
Journeyman review – Paddy Considine rolls with the punches in heartfelt boxing drama 12 Oct 5:32pm Journeyman review – Paddy Considine rolls with the punches in heartfelt boxing drama
The actor-director’s forceful but flawed story of a fighter facing a bruising crisis also stars Jodie Whittaker, outstanding as his devoted wife
 Like Reply
Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile: Lotta Sea Lice review – kindred spirits are on charming, kooky form 12 Oct 5:30pm Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile: Lotta Sea Lice review – kindred spirits are on charming, kooky form
(Matador) Although the pairing of these two wonderfully languid singer-songwriters could have ended up too hazy, their mutually dreamy, drawling styles complement each other perfectly. The way their guitars jangle and chime together reflects a longstanding friendship. They sing on each other’s old songs: Barnett’s Outta the Woodwork or a joyously upbeat version of
 Like Reply
Gucci Mane: Mr Davis review – hooks and charisma but lacks lyrical edge 12 Oct 5:15pm Gucci Mane: Mr Davis review – hooks and charisma but lacks lyrical edge
(Atlantic On the two tracks bookending this album,
 Like Reply
St Vincent: Masseduction review – abrasive, nuanced pop 12 Oct 5:00pm St Vincent: Masseduction review – abrasive, nuanced pop
(Loma Vista/Caroline International) Mechanical beats and abrasive synths underpinned by producer Jack Antonoff’s feedback-pocked soundbed-of-nails: Annie Clark’s sixth album as
 Like Reply
Rez Abbasi: Unfiltered Universe review – punchy jazz guitarist merges west and east 12 Oct 2:00pm Rez Abbasi: Unfiltered Universe review – punchy jazz guitarist merges west and east
(Whirlwind) Fans of the tightly-wound, rhythmically capricious New York downtown jazz sound of
 Like Reply
Writers step in to defend author accused of plagiarism in New York Times 12 Oct 11:41am Writers step in to defend author accused of plagiarism in New York Times
Jill Bialosky’s Poetry Will Save Your Life was charged with extensive use of others’ writing, but peers say accidental repetitions ‘were not egregious theft’ More than 70 authors, including Pulitzer prize winners Jennifer Egan and Louise Glück, have come to the defence of the editor and poet Jill Bialosky after she was accused of plagiarism, saying that Bialosky’s “inadvertent repetition of biographical boilerplate was not an egregious theft intentionally performed”. A scathing review of Bialosky’s memoir, Poetry Will Save Your Life,
 Like Reply
Harvey Weinstein: NYPD and London police investigating allegations 12 Oct 11:13am Harvey Weinstein: NYPD and London police investigating allegations
London’s Metropolitan police have opened an inquiry into the Hollywood producer’s alleged actions and the NYPD is reviewing for ‘additional complaints’ Police on both sides of the Atlantic have confirmed they are investigating Harvey Weinstein as the scandal surrounding the disgraced producer deepens. In London, the Metropolitan police are assessing a sexual abuse allegation made against him, while in his hometown of New York police are carrying out a “review” looking for new complaints against him.
 Like Reply
Joiners Arms redevelopment must include LGBT nightclub, council rules 12 Oct 10:56am Joiners Arms redevelopment must include LGBT nightclub, council rules
Decision by Tower Hamlets council thought to be first time the sexual orientation of a venue’s target market has been condition of planning approval The redevelopment of a popular gay bar in east London into a complex of luxury apartments must include an LGBT club for at least 25 years, councillors have ruled, in a landmark decision designed to stem the “shocking” closure of gay venues in the UK. Tower Hamlets council voted unanimously that the demolition of the Joiners Arms – which counted Alexander McQueen, Rufus Wainwright and Sir Ian McKellen among its regulars – could only go ahead if the development that replaced it contained a late-night LGBT venue.
 Like Reply
Andy Serkis: ‘King Kong was the epiphany. It was like: you can now do anything’ 12 Oct 10:11am Andy Serkis: ‘King Kong was the epiphany. It was like: you can now do anything’
His performances in films from The Lord of the Rings to Planet of the Apes helped transform movie acting. But his decision to direct a film, Breathe, about a disabled-rights campaigner is a very personal one, he explains Breathe is not technically Andy Serkis’s first film as a director. He had already shot his adaptation of The Jungle Book using the performance-capture technology for which the man inside Gollum has become known. But while that was in post-production, Serkis found time to direct Breathe. There is a bit of CGI – Tom Hollander plays twins – but, otherwise, it’s an interestingly old-fashioned film from a man who likes to talk about digital characters and next-generation storytelling. It was the script that did it, he says. “I really did cry my eyes out, and that never happens to me.” It was one of the films on the slate of the Imaginarium, the performance-capture studio and production company Serkis had set up with the film producer Jonathan Cavendish. Serkis was lined up to do the more whizzy performance-capture films such as adaptations of Animal Farm and The Jungle Book – the latter an entirely separate reworking from the Disney adaptation released in 2016 (both films went into production at roughly the same time) – but he asked Cavendish if he could direct Breathe. Could anyone turn down Serkis? As soon as I meet him, I’m struck by how warm and bighearted he seems – blue eyes shining, wild badgery hair and an unassuming manner.
 Like Reply
School Life review – endearing doc about an unusual Irish prep 12 Oct 8:00am School Life review – endearing doc about an unusual Irish prep
The small-scale study of a boarding school shows pupils rehearsing Teenage Kicks and flourishing under the tutelage of some gifted teachers This endearing documentary tracks life at
 Like Reply
Harvey Weinstein: all of the women who have accused him so far 12 Oct 7:19am Harvey Weinstein: all of the women who have accused him so far
A growing number of actors and others in the film industry have made accusations against the Hollywood film producer
 Like Reply
The Snowman review – Michael Fassbender plays it cool in watchable Jo Nesbø thriller 12 Oct 7:00am The Snowman review – Michael Fassbender plays it cool in watchable Jo Nesbø thriller
The bestseller about a maverick cop on the trail of a serial killer reaches the big screen in a gruesome but watchable adaptation from Tomas Alfredson Of course it’s a letdown to discover that
 Like Reply
The war with no end: why American television refuses to leave the trenches 12 Oct 6:00am The war with no end: why American television refuses to leave the trenches
American TV has long been a barometer for the country’s feelings on its military – so what do a new crop of shows say about the opinions of a divided nation?
 Like Reply
Oscars to discuss response to Harvey Weinstein allegations 12 Oct 5:08am Oscars to discuss response to Harvey Weinstein allegations
Academy has criticised film producer’s alleged behaviour and there is speculation it could suspend his membership The organisers of the Oscars are to meet to discuss their response to the mounting allegations of sexual harassment against the disgraced film producer Harvey Weinstein. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences added its voice to the growing chorus of disgust against the alleged behaviour of a man it awarded a best picture Oscar to in 1999 for producing Shakespeare in Love.
 Like Reply
The Butchering Art by Lindsey Fitzharris review – grisly medicine 12 Oct 4:00am The Butchering Art by Lindsey Fitzharris review – grisly medicine
Joseph Lister, the pioneer of antiseptic surgery, is the hero of this story of Victorian doctors with grubby hands and infected knivesLong after William Hogarth depicted a gaggle of bewigged and urine-tasting physicians under the title
 Like Reply
The Square and the Tower by Niall Ferguson review – a new understanding of global history? 12 Oct 2:30am The Square and the Tower by Niall Ferguson review – a new understanding of global history?
Don’t leave networks to conspiracy theorists, argues the prolific historian in a book that ranges from the Illuminati to Brexit and Trump
 Like Reply
Wim Wenders on his Polaroids – and why photography is now over 12 Oct 1:00am Wim Wenders on his Polaroids – and why photography is now over
Vigils for John Lennon, road trips with Annie Liebovitz, portraits of Dennis Hopper … Wim Wenders took thousands of Polaroids while making his classic films. He shares the stories behind them Wim Wenders reckons he took more than 12,000 Polaroids between 1973 and 1983, when his career as a film-maker really took off, but only 3,500 remain. “The thing is,” he says, “you gave them away. You had the person in front of you, whose picture you had just taken, and it was like they had more right to it. The Polaroids helped with making the movies, but they were not an aim in themselves. They were disposable.”
 Like Reply
The Ballad of Shirley Collins review – brilliant story of lost folk singer 12 Oct 1:00am The Ballad of Shirley Collins review – brilliant story of lost folk singer
After she lost her voice on stage in the 70s, Collins dropped off the folk map – but here she comes clean about her grief, her recovery and her music Life imitating art? In a tale of treachery and tragedy straight out of a ballad, the English folk singer Shirley Collins dramatically lost her voice on stage in the late 70s. Her husband had just her left for another woman, who’d taken to showing up at Collins’s gigs – rubbing salt in the wounds by wearing the offending ex’s jumpers. Humiliated, Collins opened her mouth but nothing came out. “He undid me. I should have got angry, but I got heartbroken,” she explains in this portrait of the artist as an older and wiser woman. Diagnosed with dysphonia, Collins dropped off the folk map until, aged 82, she released a comeback album last year. With the help of old letters, yellowing photos, audio recordings and old home-movie footage, Collins recalls her life – with additional interviews by adoring young folk singers, plus superfan
 Like Reply
Back review: farewell to Mitchell and Webb’s squirmingly good sitcom-cum-thriller 12 Oct 1:00am Back review: farewell to Mitchell and Webb’s squirmingly good sitcom-cum-thriller
Simon Blackwell’s comedy about a suspected cuckoo in the nest was surprisingly touching without veering into sentimentality. Bring on series two Channel 4 likes its comedies to emerge all tangled up in a mess of genres. The dearly departed
 Like Reply
On the top

Date settings

Today is Monday, December 18, 2017

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept