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Monday, July 17, 2017
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A female Doctor? She’s the revolutionary feminist ideal we need right now 17 Jul 12:35pm A female Doctor? She’s the revolutionary feminist ideal we need right now
The casting of Jodie Whittaker as the lead in Doctor Who is the difference between tolerating modernity and embodying it – but why has it taken so long to get here? The announcement of
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From Xinnie-the-Pooh to Putin as Dobby – world leaders and their cartoon alter-egos 17 Jul 12:00pm From Xinnie-the-Pooh to Putin as Dobby – world leaders and their cartoon alter-egos
The chubby little cubby has been booted off Chinese websites due to a likeness to Xi Jinping. He’s not the first animated character to be compared to a politician Little trouble in big China this week, as Winnie-the-Pooh has
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British Museum helps return stolen artefact to Uzbekistan 17 Jul 11:50am British Museum helps return stolen artefact to Uzbekistan
Museum contacted after large 13th-century glazed tile taken from monument in 2014 turned up for sale in Mayfair gallery The
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Apple marks World Emoji Day with beards, headscarves and breastfeeding 17 Jul 10:51am Apple marks World Emoji Day with beards, headscarves and breastfeeding
New pictograms include a bearded person, a breastfeeding woman, a sandwich, a zombie and a T-rex and will be available with iOS 11 this autumn Today is World Emoji Day, and to celebrate, Apple has revealed the final versions of some of the new emoji it will be introducing to iOS in the next version of iOS 11, which is due out this autumn. Among the new pictograms the company has showed off are “bearded person” and “breastfeeding”, and food items such as “sandwich” and “coconut”.
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Not the Booker prize 2017 needs your nominations now 17 Jul 10:28am Not the Booker prize 2017 needs your nominations now
The literary award decided by readers is back for another year of compelling contention. Please use your vote in the comments below The Not the Booker prize is back and it’s nine years old – old enough now that I really should stop expressing surprise at its continuing development. If it were a child, it would be safely past the stage of sighing heavily when I remark how much it’s grown. It would simply roll its eyes and walk off. And we don’t want that, because the award remains a source of fascination, intrigue and – best of all – unexpected and wonderful novels. This year’s search starts right here. You can nominate
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Is Love Racist? The TV show laying our biases bare 17 Jul 8:15am Is Love Racist? The TV show laying our biases bare
Yes it has a clickbaity title, and yes, this show will grind the gears of thousands – but it should. It will open everyone’s eyes to the segregated world of dating An ex-boyfriend once told me that most of his friends didn’t date black women because they didn’t find them attractive. When I got upset, he was confused. After we broke up and I took to Tinder for the first time, my inbox was suddenly brimming with messages from men fetishising me for my race. Telling me they’d never slept with a black woman before, and would I like to give it a go? With one of the most clickbaity TV titles of the year, set to grind the gears of thousands of Brits, Is Love Racist? lands on our screens this week. It uses the shock factor, setting out to explore how racism influences our dating choices. And while there are definite issues with the show, part of me wonders if this is what some people should be forcefed to finally believe the bullshit British people of colour have to put up with when looking for a relationship, or even just on the pull.
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When good TV goes bad: how Have I Got News for You shot itself in the foot 17 Jul 8:00am When good TV goes bad: how Have I Got News for You shot itself in the foot
Hislop, Merton and Deayton made a formidable trio – but the bond was broken when the captains turned on their host. The show hasn’t been the same since The panel show is a strange beast. Get it wrong and you have some of the hokiest TV imaginable: all telegraphed setups and flatlining payoffs. Get it right and you have the kind of concrete slab foundation upon which broadcasting legends are built. For just over a decade,
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I was the Doctor and I’m over the moon that at last we have a female lead | Colin Baker 17 Jul 6:26am I was the Doctor and I’m over the moon that at last we have a female lead | Colin Baker
All the Timelord reincarnations have been different, apart from their gender. Why should an alien be male? Jodie Whittaker will inspire new Doctor Who fans
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A great actor who grew into his gravitas: Martin Landau remembered 17 Jul 6:24am A great actor who grew into his gravitas: Martin Landau remembered
After making his mark on TV, the actor came into his own in his later years, with remarkable performances in Ed Wood and Crimes and Misdemeanors
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Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker to be 13th Doctor – and first woman in role 17 Jul 5:31am Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker to be 13th Doctor – and first woman in role
Actor who rose to fame in Broadchurch is first woman to play the Doctor in BBC drama, replacing Peter Capaldi The next star of Doctor Who has been announced after intense speculation – and the person stepping into the role of Time Lord is Jodie Whittaker. She is the first woman to take on the role, playing the 13th Doctor in the BBC1 drama. Whittaker, who rose to fame in ITV’s crime drama Broadchurch, had been touted as one of the contenders.
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Friends from College: why Generation X can’t grow up 17 Jul 4:00am Friends from College: why Generation X can’t grow up
The latest screen depiction of midlife crisis shows it’s not just the characters who are in denial about getting older – it’s the film-makers, too ‘I am 40 years old. The drawbridge is going up, man. It’s now or never for me,” says a panicked
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Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker as the first female Doctor will make this show buzz again 17 Jul 3:58am Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker as the first female Doctor will make this show buzz again
It would have been an outrage if a 13th man had been cast. The BBC have made this audacious revelation at exactly the right time At 4.26pm, shortly after Roger Federer became the only man to have won eight Wimbledon singles titles, the BBC interrupted its tennis coverage to announce an even more audacious first:
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At Swim, Two Boys is a great Irish novel, and a groundbreaking gay love story 17 Jul 3:00am At Swim, Two Boys is a great Irish novel, and a groundbreaking gay love story
Jamie O’Neill’s book was met with acclaim and shock on its release in 2001. Ireland may now have same-sex marriages, but the tale remains compelling I was a young man, still in my twenties, when Jamie O’Neill’s novel At Swim, Two Boys was first published in 2001. I was working in a Dublin bookshop and there was a lot of talk about the book, but for all the wrong reasons. The papers had picked up on the news.
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Boundless by Jillian Tamaki review – picture-perfect short stories 17 Jul 3:00am Boundless by Jillian Tamaki review – picture-perfect short stories
This collection of graphic short stories, quirky and ephemeral though they seem at first, are indelible in the mindIn Jillian Tamaki’s graphic short story Half Life, a young woman called Helen tries on a previously too-small dress to work out whether or not she has lost weight. And, yes, it seems that her friends, half-jealous and half-admiring, were right. Ta-dah! She really is smaller. Before the mirror in her guest bedroom, she performs a delighted little twirl. After this, though, things begin to get weird. She is visibly shrinking – and fast, too. In the street, she is mistaken for a child; at home, she can only stir the pan on her hob if she stands on a chair. Her sister, keen to protect her ever more miniature dignity, gamely stitches her a new wardrobe of doll-sized clothes but, alas, she doesn’t get to wear them for very long. In the next frame, we find her sleeping in a match box, and in the one after that, she is living in a special glass enclosure designed by doctors to prevent her being devoured by an insect or swept up on a passing bit of pollen. No one knows what has caused this condition, but in all likelihood, it won’t be long before Helen is invisible to the human eye.
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Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker announced as 13th Doctor 17 Jul 2:27am Doctor Who: Jodie Whittaker announced as 13th Doctor
Actor who rose to fame in Broadchurch is first woman to play the Doctor in BBC drama, replacing Peter Capaldi The next star of Doctor Who has been announced after intense speculation – and the person stepping into the role of Time Lord is Jodie Whittaker. She is the first woman to take on the role, playing the 13th Doctor in the BBC1 drama. Whittaker, who rose to fame in ITV’s crime drama Broadchurch, had been touted as one of the contenders.
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Depth of field: London project to dig vast underground cavern and cover with park 17 Jul 2:15am Depth of field: London project to dig vast underground cavern and cover with park
A scruffy patch of former farm land in Hounslow is set to get the ‘mega-basement to end all mega-basements’ as £50m-worth of gravel is excavated to create the UK’s biggest subterranean space, with a new public park on top While the billionaires of Kensington dig ever deeper to excavate
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Mike Bartlett drama, Albion, to be staged at Almeida theatre 17 Jul 2:01am Mike Bartlett drama, Albion, to be staged at Almeida theatre
New play from writer of King Charles III will explore ideas of British identity against backdrop of a country house A new work by Mike Bartlett, the writer behind hit play and BBC drama King Charles III, is to be staged as part of the new season at the Almeida, exploring ideas of British identity today against the backdrop of an English country house. The play, Albion, sees Bartlett return to the theatre where the Olivier award-winning production of King Charles III was first staged and will be directed by Almeida artistic director, Rupert Goold.
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I Know Who You Are review – subtle, classy, cool 17 Jul 1:00am I Know Who You Are review – subtle, classy, cool
This fabulous-looking Spanish drama gets new life out of the man-with-amnesia plot, as a hotshot lawyer finds himself under attack from all sides A bloodied man walks down the centre of a country road accompanied by urgent, discordant music. He doesn’t remember anything, not even who he is. Ah yes, amnesia, that old chestnut. A Spanish chestnut this time because
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