Back Arts Saturday, February 24, 2018
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The highest form of flattery? In praise of plagiarism2h The highest form of flattery? In praise of plagiarism
Echoes of Amélie in Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water, traces of Nabokov in Kristen Roupenian’s Cat Person ... Where is the line between influence and plagiarism? The age of the internet, where everything is connected, has made plagiarism both easier to commit and more difficult to hide, as many a student has discovered. It has also exposed writers to new levels of examination, such as the recent allegations that
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Ralph Ineson: ‘You probably get one commercial for 20 utter humiliations’2h Ralph Ineson: ‘You probably get one commercial for 20 utter humiliations’
The actor on bald patches, Steven Spielberg and impersonating animals Born in Leeds, Ineson, 48, was a teacher before he became an actor. He played
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George Ezra: ‘I don’t have a diary but I do have a sister, or “assister” as I call her’4h George Ezra: ‘I don’t have a diary but I do have a sister, or “assister” as I call her’
The singer-songwriter, 24, on touring, drinking and the importance of sleep
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Jessica Jones: the timely return of a feminist superhero5h Jessica Jones: the timely return of a feminist superhero
As a detective traumatised by loss and abuse, the Marvel superhero remodels the victim narrative in a post-Time’s Up climate When she first became Marvel’s Jessica Jones for Netflix in 2015, Krysten Ritter had layers of resonance and magnetism. The actor, whose undignified exit from Breaking Bad had left a world jonesing for her, is quite the performer; not an ounce of sentimentality or shop-bought softness. In her role as superhero Jones, she is the private detective with all the flaws one should have: broken office door-glass; a whisky habit conceived by someone with absolutely no experience of trying to drink throughout the working day; a crummy, shoestring lifestyle despite constantly being handed fists of money; and a deadly enemy in the shape of malevolent mind controller Kilgrave (David Tennant). Jones has superpowers; quite poorly defined ones that mainly involve throwing people, although she often falls, in a Buzz Lightyear fashion (“That wasn’t flying, that was falling with style”). Emotionally, she is held in suspended animation by her PTSD, which was triggered by a series of harrowing events contributing to her traumatic backstory. She is caught in the eye of a three-way storm:
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Elena Ferrante: ‘Yes, I’m Italian – but I’m not loud, I don’t gesticulate and I’m not good with pizza’5h Elena Ferrante: ‘Yes, I’m Italian – but I’m not loud, I don’t gesticulate and I’m not good with pizza’
Being Italian, for me, begins and ends with the fact that I speak and write in the Italian language I love my country, but I have no patriotic spirit and no national pride. What’s more, I digest pizza poorly, I eat very little spaghetti, I don’t speak in a loud voice, I don’t gesticulate, I hate all mafias, I don’t exclaim “Mamma mia!” National characteristics are simplifications that should be contested. Being Italian, for me, begins and ends with the fact that I speak and write in the Italian language. Put that way it doesn’t seem like much, but really it’s a lot. A language is a compendium of the history, geography, material and spiritual life, the vices and virtues, not only of those who speak it, but also of those who have spoken it through the centuries. The words, the grammar, the syntax are a chisel that shapes our thought. Not to mention our literary tradition, an extraordinary refinery of raw experience that has been active for centuries and centuries, a reservoir of intelligence and expressive techniques; it’s the tradition that has formed me, and on which I’m proud to have drawn.
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What’s on TV Saturday: Oscar-Nominated Movies and ‘Notes From the Field’6h What’s on TV Saturday: Oscar-Nominated Movies and ‘Notes From the Field’
Stream Oscar-nominated titles before the Academy Awards air next Sunday, or explore the country’s prison problem with “Notes From the Field.”
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Lost luggage: Degas painting stolen nine years ago is found on bus10h Lost luggage: Degas painting stolen nine years ago is found on bus
1877 painting Les Choristes was stolen nine years ago from a museum in Marseille French customs police have found
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Why ‘Real Women Have Curves’ Never Got Its ‘Lady Bird’ Moment11h Updated Why ‘Real Women Have Curves’ Never Got Its ‘Lady Bird’ Moment
“Lady Bird” shares many similarities with “Real Women Have Curves.” But there are more systemic barriers to blame for the film’s dismissal by Oscar voters.
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Peggy Cooper Cafritz, Patron of Black Artists, Dies at 7012h Updated Peggy Cooper Cafritz, Patron of Black Artists, Dies at 70
Also a civil rights activist and educator, she championed African and African-American art, building a collection and then rebuilding it after a fire.
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Editors’ Choice: 10 New Books We Recommend This Week12h Updated Editors’ Choice: 10 New Books We Recommend This Week
Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.
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Critic’s Notebook: A Renaissance for an Instrument of Melancholy Magic13h Updated Critic’s Notebook: A Renaissance for an Instrument of Melancholy Magic
Aristocrats played it; Stalin feared it. Now the eerie, droning hurdy-gurdy is having an unlikely renaissance with masters like Matthias Loibner.
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Critic’s Notebook: A Day of Raw Mourning and Rare Accountability on TV13h Updated Critic’s Notebook: A Day of Raw Mourning and Rare Accountability on TV
Anger and anguish over school violence dominated the news, in part because victims made sure it stayed in the news
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Songwriter review – portrait of Ed Sheeran as an obsessive, smiley Kermit15h Songwriter review – portrait of Ed Sheeran as an obsessive, smiley Kermit
‘I want to be Adele,’ says the genial, driven megastar in this slight film shot by his cousin
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Degas Painting, Stolen in 2009, Is Found on Bus Near Paris15h Updated Degas Painting, Stolen in 2009, Is Found on Bus Near Paris
“The Chorus Singers,” worth nearly $1 million, was taken from a museum in Marseille. Customs officials found the artwork in the bus’s luggage compartment.
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Newsbook: What to Read After Watching ‘Black Panther’15h Newsbook: What to Read After Watching ‘Black Panther’
There is a long tradition of black comic book creators. Here are two to start with, plus one book that gives you a historical rundown.
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Critic’s Notebook: Taking the Pulse of New York City Ballet Without Peter Martins15h Updated Critic’s Notebook: Taking the Pulse of New York City Ballet Without Peter Martins
While City Ballet waits for a successor, its history has gone on developing in performance. Roman Mejia, 18, made his presence felt.
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That Decisive Moment: Exquisite Antonacci: The Week’s 8 Best Classical Music Moments on YouTube15h That Decisive Moment: Exquisite Antonacci: The Week’s 8 Best Classical Music Moments on YouTube
A subtle Italian soprano, an organ celebration and Brahms were among the highlights.
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The 2018 Oscars Musical Performers Include Mary J. Blige and Common16h The 2018 Oscars Musical Performers Include Mary J. Blige and Common
The broadcast, on March 4, will feature five musical numbers, including “Remember Me” from “Coco” and “This Is Me” from “The Greatest Showman.”
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The Afrofuturistic Designs of ‘Black Panther’16h The Afrofuturistic Designs of ‘Black Panther’
For her extraordinarily detailed costumes, Ruth E. Carter studied the garments of the Maasai, the Lesotho and other African tribes. A 3-D printer was also key.
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16h ‘Black Panther’ Costumes Merge African History With Afrofuturism
The costume designer Ruth E. Carter has made a career of bringing black history to life in movies like “Amistad” and “Malcolm X.” But in “Black Panther” she draws on traditional African influences to look toward the future.
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Lulu returns to West End after three decades for 42nd Street16h Lulu returns to West End after three decades for 42nd Street
Singer takes over from fellow Scot Sheena Easton as vengeful Dorothy Brock at Theatre Royal Lulu is returning to the West End stage after an absence of more than 30 years to star in 42nd Street as the veteran diva Dorothy Brock. The Scottish singer has been a star since she was 15, with a career in pop music, film and theatre stretching back to the 1960s, and the unforgettable opening bellow of Shout!, her first hit record.
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Review: David Chang in the Comfort Food Zone on Netflix16h Updated Review: David Chang in the Comfort Food Zone on Netflix
In “Ugly Delicious,” the star chef chases the best pizza and barbecue, talks about authenticity and racism, and whips up some crazy Spam fried rice.
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Eddy Amoo: The Real Thing singer dies at 7316h Eddy Amoo: The Real Thing singer dies at 73
He performed on hits like You To Me Are Everything and Feel the Force in the 1970s.
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Emmerdale star hits out over Twitter abuse16h Emmerdale star hits out over Twitter abuse
Actor Danny Miller calls on Twitter to do more to stamp out homophobic language.
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Playlist: The Playlist: Janelle Monáe Feels the Funk, and 13 More New Songs17h Updated Playlist: The Playlist: Janelle Monáe Feels the Funk, and 13 More New Songs
Hear tracks by Speedy Ortiz, Mozzy, Screaming Females and more in our weekly roundup of notable new music.
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Off Broadway’s Spring Semester: Five New Plays About School17h Updated Off Broadway’s Spring Semester: Five New Plays About School
Playwrights this season are focused on many kinds of unsentimental education.
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Trump Blames Video Games for Mass Killings. Researchers Do Not.17h Trump Blames Video Games for Mass Killings. Researchers Do Not.
“I’m hearing more and more people say the level of violence on video games is really shaping young people’s thoughts,” the president said on Thursday.
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Made Before the Boston Tea Party, This Teapot Cost $800,00017h Updated Made Before the Boston Tea Party, This Teapot Cost $800,000
The teapot, which the Metropolitan Museum of Art bought at auction, is said to represent the “entrepreneurial spirit” of 18th-century America.
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Critic’s Notebook: Luigi Nono’s Harsh Music Inspires Reflection and Action17h Critic’s Notebook: Luigi Nono’s Harsh Music Inspires Reflection and Action
Two New York concerts, including a rare performance of the opera “Intolleranza 1960,” celebrate a composer who lived and wrote boldly.
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RuPaul’s Drag Race All Stars: ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race All Stars’: Season 3, Episode 5: Soup’s on!18h Updated RuPaul’s Drag Race All Stars: ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race All Stars’: Season 3, Episode 5: Soup’s on!
With only six queens left and the skill gaps narrowing, the next contestant to eliminate becomes less clear.
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Lisa Marie Presley sues former manager, claiming only $14,000 left from Elvis cash18h Lisa Marie Presley sues former manager, claiming only $14,000 left from Elvis cash
Elvis Presley’s daughter accuses Barry Siegel of ‘reckless mismanagement’ of assets inherited from her father, as Siegel claims she squandered fortune In 1993, Elvis’s daughter Lisa Marie Presley, then aged 25, inherited his $100m (£71.5m) estate. Another 25 years on, she says in a lawsuit obtained by US media that she is down to her last $14,000 .
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Inside the List: The Experiences That Inspired ‘An American Marriage’18h Inside the List: The Experiences That Inspired ‘An American Marriage’
Tayari Jones on exploring wrongful imprisonment in her new novel: “Since childhood, I have harbored a fear that prison would abduct the men in my life.”
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Stolen Degas painting Les Choristes found on a bus20h Stolen Degas painting Les Choristes found on a bus
The pastel artwork was taken more than eight years ago from the Musée Cantini in Marseille.
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Stephen Fry has prostate cancer surgery20h Stephen Fry has prostate cancer surgery
Actor had operation in January to tackle disease he describes as ‘aggressive little bugger’
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On ‘Good Girls,’ They’re the Criminal Moms Next Door21h On ‘Good Girls,’ They’re the Criminal Moms Next Door
In this new show on NBC, three suburban mothers take an unusual approach to self-empowerment: They rob a grocery store. That’s just the first episode.
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A Word With: No Matter What Rachel McAdams Plays, She Plays for Keeps21h A Word With: No Matter What Rachel McAdams Plays, She Plays for Keeps
Ms. McAdams, of “Spotlight,” “The Notebook” and “Mean Girls,” talks about her competitive side and returning to a comedic role in “Game Night.”
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On DVD: Lav Diaz and Pedro Costa: Slow Cinema on the Cutting Edge21h On DVD: Lav Diaz and Pedro Costa: Slow Cinema on the Cutting Edge
Mr. Diaz’s “The Woman Who Left” and Mr. Costa’s “Casa de Lava,” both out on disc, dissect the world of the powerless in slow-burning dramas.
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So Neanderthals made abstract art? This astounding discovery humbles every human22h So Neanderthals made abstract art? This astounding discovery humbles every human
Scientists say cave paintings in Spain, thought to have been by our ancestors, were actually by Neanderthals. So did they teach us everything we know?
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Number of leading ladies in film falls, study suggests22h Number of leading ladies in film falls, study suggests
Women accounted for just 24% of leading roles in last year's top 100 US films, a study says.
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Barbara Alston: Singer with 1960s girl group The Crystals dies at 7422h Barbara Alston: Singer with 1960s girl group The Crystals dies at 74
She recorded hits like Da Doo Ron Ron and He Hit Me with Phil Spector in the 1960s.
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Stephen Fry recovering from prostate cancer surgery23h Updated Stephen Fry recovering from prostate cancer surgery
The presenter had surgery for prostate cancer and says "it all seemed to go pretty well".
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This Week: Klimt’s Drawings, ‘UnReal,’ Reuniting Grateful Dead Alumni23h This Week: Klimt’s Drawings, ‘UnReal,’ Reuniting Grateful Dead Alumni
The artist’s work will be shown with Egon Schiele’s in Boston; and Phil Lesh and Bob Weir will play at Radio City Music Hall.
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Stephen Fry has prostate cancer23h Stephen Fry has prostate cancer
TV presenter and actor says he has been ‘in the throes of an unwelcome adventure’
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Sex, jealousy and gender: Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca 80 years on25h Sex, jealousy and gender: Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca 80 years on
Du Maurier’s bestselling novel reveals much about the author’s fluid sexuality – her ‘Venetian tendencies’ – and about being a boy stuck in the wrong body, writes Olivia Laing In 1937, a young army wife sat at her typewriter in a rented house in Alexandria, Egypt. She wasn’t happy. Despite coming from an ebullient theatrical family, she was reclusive and agonisingly shy. The social demands that came with being married to the commanding officer of the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards were far beyond her. It was too hot and she missed England bitterly, though not the small daughter and new baby she’d left behind. At the age of 30, she had already published four novels and two biographies. Yet 15,000 words of her new book were torn up in the wastepaper basket, a “literary miscarriage”. She knew the title but not what would constitute the “crash! bang!” of its plot, just that there would be two wives, one dead, and the name:
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Ariana Grande and Troye Sivan have recorded a song together25h Ariana Grande and Troye Sivan have recorded a song together
Troye revealed the collaboration on Nick Grimshaw's BBC Radio 1 show.
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The Shortlist: Dangers Close to Home: Four New Domestic Thrillers26h The Shortlist: Dangers Close to Home: Four New Domestic Thrillers
Imperiled wives inhabit the novels of Karen Cleveland, A.J. Finn, and the team of Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen. Karen Perry adds a dangerous daughter.
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Fiction: Child’s Eye View of the Dirty War26h Fiction: Child’s Eye View of the Dirty War
A mysterious mother and her uncertain fate haunt the debut novel “A Beautiful Young Woman,” by the Argentine writer Julián López.
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Nonfiction: Harlem Wasn’t the Only Place With a Renaissance26h Nonfiction: Harlem Wasn’t the Only Place With a Renaissance
Mark Whitaker’s “Smoketown” tells the untold story of Pittsburgh’s role as an African-American mecca in the mid-20th century.
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Best of Late Night: Trevor Noah Ridicules Marco Rubio After a Combative Town Hall26h Best of Late Night: Trevor Noah Ridicules Marco Rubio After a Combative Town Hall
“Maybe bullying isn’t that bad after all,” Noah said of the Florida senator’s grilling over gun control by students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.
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Fiction: Ismail Kadare Grapples With the Supernatural26h Fiction: Ismail Kadare Grapples With the Supernatural
In “A Girl in Exile,” a celebrated Albanian novelist tells a tale of love and death, and ghosts who transcend both.
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Nonfiction: When It Comes to Writing, Cheston Knapp Is His Own Harshest Critic26h Nonfiction: When It Comes to Writing, Cheston Knapp Is His Own Harshest Critic
In a collection of linked autobiographical essays, “Up Up, Down Down,” the debut author reveals the anxieties of contemporary authorship.
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Fiction: Seeking Asylum but Finding Heartbreak26h Fiction: Seeking Asylum but Finding Heartbreak
Sharon Bala’s debut novel, “The Boat People” — the fictionalized account of a real incident in 2010 — pits Sri Lankan Tamil refugees against the Canadian government.
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Children’s Books: In New Novels for Kids, Dangerous Journeys and Hockey Madness26h Children’s Books: In New Novels for Kids, Dangerous Journeys and Hockey Madness
Books from Christopher Paul Curtis, Cynthia Kadohata, Veera Hiranandani and April Stevens offer thrills, suspense and some quieter pleasures, too.
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Pursuits: Silver-Screen Travel Inspiration for Oscars Season26h Pursuits: Silver-Screen Travel Inspiration for Oscars Season
From Sylva, N.C., to Dunkirk, France, this year’s Academy Award nominees offer plenty of vacation possibilities for the film-obsessed traveler.
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Is it an Art Collective or a Vietnamese Ad Agency? Yes and Yes.26h Is it an Art Collective or a Vietnamese Ad Agency? Yes and Yes.
An exhibition in San Jose, Calif., shines a light on the Propeller Group, Vietnam’s renowned art collective, as its members strike out on their own.
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Essay: Stanley Bing’s Real Identity Was a Closely Guarded Secret. Until It Wasn’t.26h Essay: Stanley Bing’s Real Identity Was a Closely Guarded Secret. Until It Wasn’t.
Gil Schwartz on his double life as a mole in the corporate world.
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Paperback Row26h Updated Paperback Row
Six new paperbacks to check out this week.
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Why The Post should win the 2018 best picture Oscar26h Why The Post should win the 2018 best picture Oscar
Ahead of the Academy Awards, Jonathan Freedland celebrates Steven Spielberg’s timely tale of press freedom For a man who is the world’s most successful film-maker, Steven Spielberg has a remarkably thin record at the Oscars. Of course, this points to the perennial Spielberg debate: is his accomplishment chiefly commercial, measured in box-office receipts, rather than artistic? Are his films bankable and crowdpleasing rather than great? Among those who take the former view, the fact that a director first nominated by the Academy 40 years ago – for
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Beyonce and Jay-Z fans think there could be a joint tour on the way26h Beyonce and Jay-Z fans think there could be a joint tour on the way
A Ticketmaster listing is fuelling speculation that the stars are set for a joint tour.
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Milan Fashion Week: How Paul Surridge took the reins of Cavalli27h Milan Fashion Week: How Paul Surridge took the reins of Cavalli
Paul Surridge on the pressures of becoming the Italian fashion brand's creative director.
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What’s on TV Friday: ‘Mute’ and ‘Ugly Delicious’30h What’s on TV Friday: ‘Mute’ and ‘Ugly Delicious’
A cyberpunk movie from Duncan Jones comes to Netflix. And HBO’s “2 Dope Queens” wraps up with the fourth episode, featuring Uzo Aduba and Tituss Burgess.
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Young Sheldon review: he’s an irritating little smartypants – but he’s headed for something Big one day30h Young Sheldon review: he’s an irritating little smartypants – but he’s headed for something Big one day
There are plenty of laughs in this prequel to The Big Bang Theory, but the emotional punches are only threatened, and never land East Texas, 1989, and a nine-year-old boy is playing with his train set. Not so much for the love of trains but because it allows him to demonstrate Newton’s first law of motion, that an object in motion stays in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by another force. This little boy will become a physicist one day. “Dinner’s ready,” the boy’s mum calls out. He doesn’t go down, until his twin sister threatens to lick his toothbrush if he doesn’t. He has a thing about cleanliness: he puts on mittens before holding hands with his family to thank God for the food they are about to receive (Mum’s into Him – God, that is).
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Karen Gillan: ‘I’m living with a consistent, subtle homesickness’30h Karen Gillan: ‘I’m living with a consistent, subtle homesickness’
The Scottish actor, ex-Doctor Who companion and Guardian of the Galaxy is making her directorial debut. She talks about Time’s Up, her love of the Highlands – and how she was ‘delusional’ about her acting abilityKaren Gillan enters the restaurant in downtown Manhattan, tall and slightly ungainly, with the high colour of one still young enough to be easily embarrassed. The 30-year-old recently moved to New York from LA, after five years spent appearing mainly in blockbusters, and is promoting a much more modest film today. The Party’s Just Beginning, written by and starring Gillan, is also her directorial debut and is set in her native Inverness, although “it’s not the postcard version”, she says, laughing. Nonetheless, it is infused with affection. “All the time,” she says, when I ask if she misses Scotland. “I’m living with a consistent, subtle homesickness all the time.” In the movie, which had a budget of £1.8m – “not the smallest in the world,” says Gillan, “but in the grand scheme of things very low” – she plays Lucy, a woman in her early 20s still living at home and struggling to find a life beyond the cheese counter in the supermarket where she works and the emotionally deadened life of her parents. It is a film about youth, alienation and, above all, friendship, in which the strongest dialogue is that between Lucy and her married friend Donna, and strongly suggests that, while the movie is a drama, and at times a high drama, Gillan’s writing talent may lie more persuasively in comedy.
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The Windsor Knot: a twisted take on the royal nuptials – podcasts of the week30h The Windsor Knot: a twisted take on the royal nuptials – podcasts of the week
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding gets a sideways look, and The Onion’s hilarious true crime spoof stands out in a stellar week for streaming
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Review: ‘Jerry Springer,’ Sacred and Profane, Triumphantly Sings Again31h Updated Review: ‘Jerry Springer,’ Sacred and Profane, Triumphantly Sings Again
This divinely wrought, beautifully sung New Group production finds compassion within a very relevant satire.
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Outsider Art Fair to Expand to Basel31h Outsider Art Fair to Expand to Basel
The fair, which celebrates self-taught artists, will open up a satellite event in Switzerland during Art Basel in June.
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