Back Arts Sunday, October 22, 2017
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Doctor Who: Bradley Walsh among new cast members17m Doctor Who: Bradley Walsh among new cast members
Jodie Whittaker's Time Lord will be joined by Bradley Walsh, Tosin Cole and Mandip Gill.
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Advertising: With Literary Support, Xerox Asserts Its Modern Relevance1h 14m Updated Advertising: With Literary Support, Xerox Asserts Its Modern Relevance
Xerox, in collaboration with the 92nd Street Y, gathered essays from writers like Gary Shteyngart and Joyce Carol Oates to help reinforce its role in the workplace.
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Review: An Inspiring End to a 6-Month Tour of Monteverdi’s Operas3h Updated Review: An Inspiring End to a 6-Month Tour of Monteverdi’s Operas
The conductor John Eliot Gardiner completes an international tour presenting the three surviving Monteverdi operas at Lincoln Center
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Titanic Letter Sells for Record Price at Auction in England5h Updated Titanic Letter Sells for Record Price at Auction in England
A collector paid £126,000 for a note from an American passenger to his mother that describes the ill-fated ocean liner as a “giant” ship fitted up like a palatial hotel.
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Strictly Come Dancing: week five - as it happened5h Updated Strictly Come Dancing: week five - as it happened
It’s week five - which Strictly couples created poetry on the dancefloor, and who foxtrotted off home?
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Strictly Come Dancing: Week five results - live5h Updated Strictly Come Dancing: Week five results - live
It’s Week five - which Strictly couples created poetry on the dancefloor, and who will be foxtrotting off home?
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Fine Arts & Exhibits: The Aftermath of War, Seen Through Photographers’ Eyes5h Updated Fine Arts & Exhibits: The Aftermath of War, Seen Through Photographers’ Eyes
A show curated for the Harn Museum of Art in Florida explores the consequences of war in the Middle East. Two other museums have taken the exhibit.
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Review: After a Decade, Martha Argerich Returns to Carnegie Hall5h Review: After a Decade, Martha Argerich Returns to Carnegie Hall
The great pianist brought real delirium to a Prokofiev performance with Antonio Pappano and the Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia.
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‘Tyler Perry’s Boo 2’ Is No. 1 Amid a Plethora of Duds6h Updated ‘Tyler Perry’s Boo 2’ Is No. 1 Amid a Plethora of Duds
Hollywood cleaned its cupboard over the weekend, releasing five new films with limited potential. But Tyler Perry secured his sixth No. 1 opening.
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Review: 1 Actor, in 8 Roles, Wrestles Nuance From Eugene O’Neill’s ‘Strange Interlude’7h Review: 1 Actor, in 8 Roles, Wrestles Nuance From Eugene O’Neill’s ‘Strange Interlude’
David Greenspan’s performance in the 6-hour melodrama is masterful in its clarity and endurance.
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The Newseum Is Increasingly Relevant, but Can It Survive?7h Updated The Newseum Is Increasingly Relevant, but Can It Survive?
The institution that celebrates journalism is now reckoning with years of financial deficits, partly caused by a news industry in turmoil.
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Julien Baker Bravely Confronts Her Traumas and Fears8h Julien Baker Bravely Confronts Her Traumas and Fears
On her second album, ‘Turn Out the Lights,” the Nashville singer and songwriter reaches for ‘radical vulnerability,’ and hope.
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Popcast: The Persistence of Pink and Kelly Clarkson, Outspoken Pop Survivors9h Updated Popcast: The Persistence of Pink and Kelly Clarkson, Outspoken Pop Survivors
Two of the music world’s biggest voices and boldest personalities are back. Deep into successful careers, where have their paths diverged? A conversation, on Popcast.
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Monteroduni Journal: Hundreds of Italy’s Churches Were Robbed of Artworks. This One Was Recovered.10h Monteroduni Journal: Hundreds of Italy’s Churches Were Robbed of Artworks. This One Was Recovered.
The country’s 60,000 churches are a treasure trove of masterpieces and artifacts. Protecting them from theft while keeping them open to the public is no easy task.
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Fine Arts & Exhibits: Nandipha Mntambo’s Journey From Taxidermy to Art14h Fine Arts & Exhibits: Nandipha Mntambo’s Journey From Taxidermy to Art
Ms. Mntambo, an artist who grew up in South Africa, has become known for her work in cowhide — an idea that came to her in a dream.
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The trouble with getting lost in your own world | David Mitchell15h The trouble with getting lost in your own world | David Mitchell
Protecting students from ‘distressing’ plays and hi-tech targeted ads further removes us from a shared sense of what is realDo we really want to know what’s actually going on? In the world and in the past and in plant cells and in space and in the flat upstairs? I get that it’s always going to be impossible to be sure. All any of us has to go on is a load of nerve signals hastily compiled into a vaguely coherent impression by the grey sponge that seems to be the site of the key thing that makes each of us whoever each of us is. It’s an impression that can get skewed by fear, rage, self-interest, hunger, a bad back or by being, to a greater or lesser extent, mad. Anyone who’s suffered from sciatica will tell you how disconcerting it is to feel a pain you’re convinced is emanating from your leg but which is in fact caused by an injury, located somewhere in the spine, to the nerve responsible for leg news. But it doesn’t feel like a faulty line – the nerve doesn’t crackle. It just feels like a sore leg. It is a totally convincing, rather undramatic, delusion and a salutary reminder that when we think we’re definitely looking at a table, that’s actually just the narrative our brain is imposing upon unsubstantiated data supplied by the ocular nerve.
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Meet the new hotshots of American film-making16h Meet the new hotshots of American film-making
As Dee Rees’s racially charged, Oscar-tipped film Mudbound debuts on Netflix, we speak to the director about challenging the establishment, while below, we profile directors Eliza Hittman, the Safdie brothers and Chloé Zhao In the opening scene of the new film
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Grace Jones: ‘Size zero is like the walking dead. Not sexy at all’16h Grace Jones: ‘Size zero is like the walking dead. Not sexy at all’
The model, singer – and subject of a new film – on Trump, not being allowed to hit people and why she misses Concorde A singer, songwriter, actor and model, Grace Jones was born in Jamaica in 1948. She was brought up by her grandmother and violent step-grandfather and moved to Syracuse, New York, to join her parents when she was 13. In the 80s, she had several hits, including
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I Am Not a Witch review – magical surrealism16h I Am Not a Witch review – magical surrealism
Rungano Nyoni’s debut feature, the story of a girl in Zambia accused of witchcraft, is comic, tragic – and captivatingly beautifulIn a remote Zambian village, a nine-year-old girl (Margaret Mulubwa) is accused of being a witch and given a stark choice: to accept her supernatural branding and live a tethered life as a sorceress, or to cut her ties with local tradition and be transformed into a goat that may be killed and eaten for supper. Thus begins this bewilderingly strange yet terrifically sure-footed feature debut from writer-director Rungano Nyoni. Born in Zambia and part-raised in Wales, Nyoni first made international waves with such award-winning shorts as
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Courtney Pine: Black Notes from the Deep review – still top dog17h Courtney Pine: Black Notes from the Deep review – still top dog
(Freestyle) Ever one to mix things up, Britain’s most celebrated jazzer follows a low-key ballads album with a
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Farshid Moussavi: La Folie Divine, Montpellier; Îlot 19 La Défense – review17h Farshid Moussavi: La Folie Divine, Montpellier; Îlot 19 La Défense – review
Two apartment blocks in France by the London architect Farshid Moussavi show that affordable housing can be inspirational and stand up to grander neighbours On the outskirts of Montpellier in southern France, in response to a former mayor’s request for a series of “follies”, rises
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Islander: A Journey Around Our Archipelago by Patrick Barkham – review17h Islander: A Journey Around Our Archipelago by Patrick Barkham – review
Nature writer Patrick Barkham finds a sense of salvation in this insightful tour of Britain’s sea-bound communitiesThe epigraphs of
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The Death of Stalin review – more bleak than black17h The Death of Stalin review – more bleak than black
Armando Iannucci’s comic-book adaptation, about the aftermath of the despot’s death, is less caustic than his usual offeringsKnown and loved for lacerating political satires
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Simone Lia on the common cold17h Simone Lia on the common cold
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/culture/ng-interactive/2017/oct/22/simone-lia-on-the-common-cold">Continue reading...
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Philip Pullman: ‘My daemon is a raven, a bird that steals things’17h Philip Pullman: ‘My daemon is a raven, a bird that steals things’
Philip Pullman, whose His Dark Materials trilogy is celebrated the world over, has finally produced a new instalment in Lyra’s story. Here he answers questions from Observer readers and famous fans including Ed Sheeran, Rowan Williams and Ali SmithPhilip Pullman opens the door to his 16th-century Oxfordshire farmhouse looking pale and slightly washed-out in his crisp, white shirt and nut-brown waistcoat. Is he under the weather? “No, no, I’m perfectly fine,” he reassures me. “Just a bit apprehensive, perhaps, about what’s to come.” We are meeting a week before the launch of his new novel, so what is to come in the next few days is a whirlwind of book signings, public appearances, glad-handing, readings and interviews: “I’m doing the minimum possible but it is still going to be absolute pandemonium,” he smiles ruefully. In truth, Pullman feels fitter and more energetic than he has for a long while. He spent much of the past couple of years in constant pain, until surgery restored him to full health last spring. “I’m a great deal better now, but that’s one reason I’m trying to keep the fuss to a minimum,” he says. You sense he might feel short-changed with no fuss at all, however, and Pullman grants that he is looking forward to sitting down in his book-lined study and getting to grips with my very long list of questions from
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Dina review – a soft-focus study in intimacy17h Dina review – a soft-focus study in intimacy
This documentary about a couple on the autism spectrum getting married tells a thought-provoking but sweet love story Dina Buno is pretty much your average, rambling, rainbow sock-wearing fortysomething girlie-girl. She likes the Kardashians (“They’re my guilty pleasure, I can’t help it”), Sex and the City, getting her nails done, the colour pink, and is planning her wedding to boyfriend, Scott (butterflies are the theme). She’s also neurodivergent, or on the autistic spectrum, with a history of trauma that presents her with unique challenges in her relationships. Dan Sickles and Antonio Santini’s extraordinary character study is, technically speaking, an observational documentary, though it plays more like a soft-focus romantic comedy, punctuated by pop songs and framed by pastel, lavender lighting. Sickles and Santini excel at constructing a respectful (but never cold or clinical) distance from their subject, using long takes to let her explain herself in her own words. Dina is hypersensitive, self-aware, emotionally generous and, sometimes, ordinarily vain (on the beach in a leopard-print swimsuit,she craves compliments). She describes herself as “a strong-willed person” and “a butt girl” and is candid with her feelings. But the film is no pity party; instead, it’s a fascinating, rare look at how intimacy is built and sustained.
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RL Boyce: ‘I want the world to know what I do’17h RL Boyce: ‘I want the world to know what I do’
The Mississippi bluesman on his musical influences, living the slow life and his never-ending house parties
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Rachmaninov: All-Night Vigil CD review – not Russian, but not half bad17h Rachmaninov: All-Night Vigil CD review – not Russian, but not half bad
Catherine Wyn-Rogers, Adam Tunnicliffe, Vasari Singers/Backhouse
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The week in radio and podcasts: Afternoon Edition; Savage Lovecast; My Dad Wrote a Porno; Aria awards18h The week in radio and podcasts: Afternoon Edition; Savage Lovecast; My Dad Wrote a Porno; Aria awards
It was a bad week for women in the workplace, but a good one for a sex advice guru and 5 Live
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The Week in TV: Gunpowder; The Ganges with Sue Perkins; Chris Packham: Asperger’s and Me and more18h The Week in TV: Gunpowder; The Ganges with Sue Perkins; Chris Packham: Asperger’s and Me and more
An all-star cast tackled the Gunpowder Plot, Sue Perkins grieved on the Ganges and Chris Packham came out fighting for autism
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Of Women: In the 21st Century by Shami Chakrabarti review – tell us something we don’t know18h Of Women: In the 21st Century by Shami Chakrabarti review – tell us something we don’t know
This essay on global gender inequality professes to be the product of long rumination but feels like the oppositeIn an
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Dare Not Linger: The Presidential Years by Nelson Mandela and Mandla Langa review – an impossible act to follow18h Dare Not Linger: The Presidential Years by Nelson Mandela and Mandla Langa review – an impossible act to follow
This account of Mandela’s years in power, compiled from his own notes, reveals why he was irreplaceableSix months after the 1994 election that brought the ANC to power, I was interviewing
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What’s on TV Sunday: James Bond and ‘The Jellies’19h What’s on TV Sunday: James Bond and ‘The Jellies’
Watch the premiere of a Tyler, the Creator, animated series. And Jamie and Claire reunite on “Outlander.”
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Former US presidents gather for hurricanes fundraiser20h Former US presidents gather for hurricanes fundraiser
The five living former US presidents have raised more than $31m (£23.5m) for victims.
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How Wim Wenders put the snap back into Polaroids24h How Wim Wenders put the snap back into Polaroids
The movie-maker shows off his eclectic collection of self-snapped prints taken over many decades.
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La traviata; Les Vêpres siciliennes; LSO/ Haitink – review24h La traviata; Les Vêpres siciliennes; LSO/ Haitink – review
Theatre Royal, Glasgow; Royal Opera House; Barbican, London
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Game of Thrones actor Indira Varma stars in child abuse drama25h Game of Thrones actor Indira Varma stars in child abuse drama
Varma explores all-too-real fears of domestic sexual abuse in a documentary maker’s fictionalised account on Channel 4It is a crime that terrifies parents, and is one of the hardest to tackle in a drama. Now, Indira Varma, last seen facing down her enemies as a vengeful Sand Snake mother in
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Uncommon Type: Some Stories by Tom Hanks – digested read25h Uncommon Type: Some Stories by Tom Hanks – digested read
‘After we came back from the moon, we all went home for some nice apple pie. Whoopety-doodah-day’
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Hollywood? It’s finished, claims Oscar-winning director who fled to New York27h Hollywood? It’s finished, claims Oscar-winning director who fled to New York
Paul Haggis, who depicted LA’s racist underbelly in Crash, says Harvey Weinstein scandal is another sign of the film capital’s need for radical changeA change of the old order in Hollywood is long overdue, according to Paul Haggis, the Oscar-winning film-maker behind the hit films
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Strictly Come Dancing: week five - live28h Updated Strictly Come Dancing: week five - live
There’s a samba from Alexandra this week, which deserves full marks for rhyming value alone. So which other Strictly couples will be creating poetry on the dancefloor, and who will be foxtrotting off home?
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The persuasive art of the dust jacket31h The persuasive art of the dust jacket
Book covers have long been a source of artistic quality and, in the age of Kindle, are reintroducing more and more of us to the pleasures of traditional reading
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Rockwell’s Children Sue Berkshire Museum to Stop Sale of His Works35h Rockwell’s Children Sue Berkshire Museum to Stop Sale of His Works
The artist’s three children and several museum members argue that it is unlawful for the institution to sell two Rockwell paintings and other works.
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Modern Toss – cartoon36h Updated Modern Toss – cartoon
To bee or not to bee: National Honey Week starts on 23 October!
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Fine Arts & Exhibits: Art Lurks in an Unlikely Place for Mary Kelly: the Dryer38h Fine Arts & Exhibits: Art Lurks in an Unlikely Place for Mary Kelly: the Dryer
The conceptual artist has her first New York gallery show in five years, featuring politically loaded artwork made out of compressed lint.
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Fine Arts & Exhibits: Need a Good Laugh? Check Out Some 17th-Century Dutch Art38h Fine Arts & Exhibits: Need a Good Laugh? Check Out Some 17th-Century Dutch Art
An exhibit at the Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem, the Netherlands, will show that many paintings from the Dutch Golden Age “have a joke as their very core.”
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‘Who wrote Mrs Osmond?’ – John Banville on writing a sequel to The Portrait of a Lady38h ‘Who wrote Mrs Osmond?’ – John Banville on writing a sequel to The Portrait of a Lady
‘It did seem that I might be a character in one of the Master’s tales of the uncanny’ … the author recounts how his follow-up to Henry James’s classic came into being I embarked on the writing of
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What Would Diplo Do? A mockumentary for the EDM generation38h What Would Diplo Do? A mockumentary for the EDM generation
Starring Dawson’s Creek’s James Van Der Beek as the superstar DJ, Viceland’s first scripted comedy is so meta it hurts ‘You know you’re not Jesus, right?” barks Brian in What Would Diplo Do? (
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The Look: Traveling Across Japan38h The Look: Traveling Across Japan
Hiroyuki Ito, a photographer who grew up in Tokyo, wanted to see more of his country. So he spent two months this summer documenting interesting moments.
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Fine Arts & Exhibits: Alexis Rockman Portrays the Great Lakes in Glory and Decline39h Fine Arts & Exhibits: Alexis Rockman Portrays the Great Lakes in Glory and Decline
The Great Lakes Cycle is made up of five oil, alkyd and acrylic paintings that depict environmental issues affecting the lakes. The exhibition is traveling around the country.
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39h An Eclectic Mix of Arts Without Walls
La Jolla Playhouse’s Without Walls festival takes to San Diego’s streets and public buildings for the first time with a diverse offering of immersive performances.
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Andrew Michael Hurley: ‘​Some days I don’t look up until my wife texts to tell me to ea​t’39h Andrew Michael Hurley: ‘​Some days I don’t look up until my wife texts to tell me to ea​t’
The author of The Loney on his not-so-Scandi-neat study, why he feels guilty going for a walk and what humans will look like in a thousand yearsWatching the morning travel updates on the news as the rest of the family gets ready to leave, I’m grateful that on writing days I don’t have to commute any further than the study at the back of the garage. It’s a nice space in which to work. The double glazing blots out the noise of the traffic on the M55. I have a view of things both deciduous and evergreen in the garden. The decor is hopeful; the white walls, desk, bookshelves and small sofa all say efficiency, order, focus – watchwords for a professional writer serious about his work, oh yes. But for all the promises I made to myself about keeping things Scandi-neat in the study, I have reverted inevitably to type. Books and files sit on the sofa more often than I do. A picture leans against the wall waiting to be hung. On the desk, the laptop is elbowed by books. To the left it’s
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A Revolution of Feeling by Rachel Hewitt review – the anguish of failed utopians40h A Revolution of Feeling by Rachel Hewitt review – the anguish of failed utopians
A daring history of Mary Wollstonecraft and other 1790s radicals suggests this was the decade that ‘forged the modern mind’In 1794 Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey set out to save the human race. By establishing a small political community in which property was held in common and everyone had a vote, they wanted to create a utopia where “wrath, anger, clamour, and evil speaking” were nothing but a bad memory. The 27 hand-picked communitarians would rub along together comfortably, bound by a sort of sunny reasonableness. Coleridge and Southey, who were still undergraduates when they dreamed up the scheme, were typical of their time in believing that political change went hand in hand with “revolutions of feeling”. To have any hope of achieving one you had to fix the other. Naturally it all went wrong. The original idea had been to set up the community in post-revolutionary America, an appropriate place for radical new beginnings. But when that proved to be expensive – Coleridge was already deep in debt as a result of some distinctly unreasonable expenditure on wine and women – someone suggested they scale the scheme back to a “Welch Farm” instead. Then there was the question of sex. In a community where property would be held in common, did that mean wives would be shared, too? Quite aside from the impropriety of the thing, it sounded so cold and calculating, as if sex were a passionless commodity rather than the affective glue that held two loving individuals together. Then Southey, who was always of a pragmatic turn of mind, suggested that perhaps the new community should include some servants. They would eat at the same table as everyone else, of course, but they would spend their days doing the hard labour while the full members of the community thought and wrote about the joys of social equality. Coleridge was appalled – if Southey wanted “slaves” then the game was clearly over.
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The 10 best things to do this week: Grace Jones, back on the big screen40h The 10 best things to do this week: Grace Jones, back on the big screen
The iconoclastic singer gets her own sublime documentary. Plus, Oscar-tipped gay drama Call Me By Your Name
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‘Fox 8’ by George Saunders: a fantastical tale from the Man Booker winner40h ‘Fox 8’ by George Saunders: a fantastical tale from the Man Booker winner
This week the master of the short story won the Booker for Lincoln in the Bardo. ‘Fox 8’ is a heartfelt letter to YumansDeer Reeder: First may I say, sorry for any werds I spel rong. Because I am a fox! So don’t rite or spel perfect. But here is how I lerned to rite and spel as gud as I do!
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Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke review – racial tensions in small-town Texas41h Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke review – racial tensions in small-town Texas
A black investigator’s quest for justice drives this nuanced meditation on race, roots and belonging Locke’s mesmerising new novel bears all the hallmarks of modern crime fiction: the alcoholic protagonist with the damaged marriage; the townsfolk who close rank against outsiders; the small-town law enforcement agent with murky loyalties. But
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Travel Man: 48 Hours in … Rome review – a gentle mini-break for the mind42h Travel Man: 48 Hours in … Rome review – a gentle mini-break for the mind
Richard Ayoade takes Matt Lucas on a surreal whistlestop tour through the byways and white-knuckle highways of Rome Travel Man: 48 Hours In …, in which we visit various cities around the world in the company of presenter
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What’s on TV Saturday: ‘George Michael: Freedom’ and ‘Stranger Than Fiction’43h What’s on TV Saturday: ‘George Michael: Freedom’ and ‘Stranger Than Fiction’
A new portrait of George Michael arrives on Showtime. And Will Ferrell becomes a reluctant protagonist in “Stranger Than Fiction.”
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