Back Arts Tuesday, October 16, 2018
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British-Nigerian filmmaker Adeyemi Michael: all immigrants are conquerors4h British-Nigerian filmmaker Adeyemi Michael: all immigrants are conquerors
Adeyemi Michael's mum stars in his film, riding a horse down a busy London street in Nigerian dress.
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Man Booker Prize: Anna Burns becomes first winner from Northern Ireland5h Updated Man Booker Prize: Anna Burns becomes first winner from Northern Ireland
Anna Burns, the writer of Milkman, is the first author from Northern Ireland to win the prize.
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Moment Milkman author wins Man Booker6h Moment Milkman author wins Man Booker
The author from Northern Ireland took away the award for her book set during the Troubles.
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Art Review: Female Artists Strip Rape of Its ‘Heroic’ Underpinnings6h Updated Art Review: Female Artists Strip Rape of Its ‘Heroic’ Underpinnings
At John Jay College, contemporary art-makers find a new way to talk about sexual assault. They focus on aftermath and feelings, rather than flesh or spectacle.
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Books News: Anna Burns Wins the Man Booker Prize for ‘Milkman’6h Books News: Anna Burns Wins the Man Booker Prize for ‘Milkman’
The judges cited her use of dark humor to explore tribalism, state-sponsored terrorism, social division and sexual and political oppression.
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Anna Burns wins Man Booker prize for ‘incredibly original’ Milkman6h Anna Burns wins Man Booker prize for ‘incredibly original’ Milkman
Judges unanimous in choice of Northern Irish winner for ‘utterly distinctive’ Troubles-era novel Anna Burns has become the first Northern Irish author to win the Man Booker prize, taking the £50,000 award for Milkman, her timely, Troubles-set novel about a young woman being sexually harassed by a powerful man.
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Chance the Rapper Isn’t Running: Your Tuesday Pop Culture Cheat Sheet7h Chance the Rapper Isn’t Running: Your Tuesday Pop Culture Cheat Sheet
What you need to know from today’s TV, music and movie news.
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Critic’s Pick: Is Sarah Lucas Right for the #MeToo Moment?8h Critic’s Pick: Is Sarah Lucas Right for the #MeToo Moment?
Ms. Lucas, whose career survey is on view at the New Museum, was part of a punk-era correction around class and gender. Now, with disintegrating borders and fluid genders, her art is being tested.
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Books of The Times: A Novel That Roiled India Is Now Translated Into English8h Books of The Times: A Novel That Roiled India Is Now Translated Into English
In Perumal Murugan’s “One Part Woman,” a religious festival allows childless women to sleep with men other than their husbands, in the hope of becoming pregnant.
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Mario Buatta, Interior Designer and ‘Prince of Chintz,’ Dies at 828h Mario Buatta, Interior Designer and ‘Prince of Chintz,’ Dies at 82
He made exuberant use of pillows, fringes, swags, tassels, bows and ruffles for a list of clients that included the famous as well as the merely rich.
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Alice Mann wins 2018 Taylor Wessing prize with series Drummies8h Alice Mann wins 2018 Taylor Wessing prize with series Drummies
Four portraits of South African majorettes from Western Cape are first time a series has won A portrait series on all-female teams of drum majorettes in South Africa’s Western Cape province has won a major photography award. Alice Mann, a London-based photographic artist, was awarded the 2018
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Winner of the 2018 Taylor Wessing photographic portrait prize announced – in pictures8h Winner of the 2018 Taylor Wessing photographic portrait prize announced – in pictures
Boxing, shopping, smoking, singing, swimming … the annual competition salutes the best in contemporary portrait photography, and with it the variety of human life. This year there were 5,000 submissions from 70 countries – here is the winning work from Alice Mann, plus all the runners-up and highlights from the accompanying National Portrait Gallery exhibition
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Nonfiction: The Man Who Pioneered Food Safety8h Nonfiction: The Man Who Pioneered Food Safety
In “The Poison Squad,” Deborah Blum tells the story of the early-20th-century U.S.D.A. inspector who changed the way we think about food.
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Taylor Wessing Prize: Alice Mann wins with portraits of drum majorettes8h Taylor Wessing Prize: Alice Mann wins with portraits of drum majorettes
South African photographer Alice Mann is announced the winner of the Taylor Wessing Prize.
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Critic’s Notebook: Goodbye to All That Blaze: Joaquin De Luz Dances His Farewell9h Updated Critic’s Notebook: Goodbye to All That Blaze: Joaquin De Luz Dances His Farewell
New York City Ballet’s fall season ended with Mr. De Luz’s final performance — and with debuts and promotions, too.
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Chance Is Not Running for Mayor: Your Tuesday Pop Culture Cheat Sheet10h Chance Is Not Running for Mayor: Your Tuesday Pop Culture Cheat Sheet
What you need to know from today’s TV, music and movie news.
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Review: Berlioz, Rendered Newly Audacious at Carnegie Hall10h Review: Berlioz, Rendered Newly Audacious at Carnegie Hall
John Eliot Gardiner and the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique played two thrilling programs of the composer’s not-at-all-soothing music.
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Reporter’s Notebook: At Unsound Festival, the Weirder, the Better11h Reporter’s Notebook: At Unsound Festival, the Weirder, the Better
Established in 2003, Unsound has established itself as an international destination for experimental and club music. But it’s at odds with the historic city where it takes place.
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Kanye Has Faced Criticism for Being a Black Trump Fan. Can You Relate?11h Kanye Has Faced Criticism for Being a Black Trump Fan. Can You Relate?
We’re hoping to hear from people of color who support President Trump and are politically active.
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Review: ‘The Price of Everything’ Asks $56 Billion Questions About Art11h Review: ‘The Price of Everything’ Asks $56 Billion Questions About Art
This documentary examines the global art market, and pauses to look at some pictures along the way.
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Doctor Who: Biggest first episode for new Doctor11h Doctor Who: Biggest first episode for new Doctor
Jodie Whittaker was the most-watched new Doctor in the history of the long-running series.
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Trump mocks Stormy Daniels after defamation case dismissed12h Trump mocks Stormy Daniels after defamation case dismissed
The president says he can "go after Horseface" after a judge threw out one of her lawsuits.
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Tom Stoppard, Always Tackling ‘The Hard Problem’13h Tom Stoppard, Always Tackling ‘The Hard Problem’
Can a drama about the nature of consciousness be emotional, too? For its latest production, he’s tinkered with the script to firmly answer yes.
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She Founded Me Too. Now She Wants to Move Past the Trauma.13h She Founded Me Too. Now She Wants to Move Past the Trauma.
One year after #MeToo upended Hollywood and politics, Tarana Burke talks about the movement’s future, the #HimToo backlash and advice for survivors.
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Amazon launches water-resistant Kindle Paperwhite14h Amazon launches water-resistant Kindle Paperwhite
Update of popular e-reader introduces thinner and lighter design, Bluetooth compatibility and audiobook support Amazon has launched a new version of its popular Kindle Paperwhite e-reader, which is thinner, lighter and now finally water resistant. The new 2018 Kindle Paperwhite is the second Amazon e-ink device to be given the water resistance treatment following the launch of the Rolls Royce of e-readers, the
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Fortnite cheat YouTuber sued by Epic Games15h Fortnite cheat YouTuber sued by Epic Games
A YouTube gamer is being sued for selling Fortnite cheats and promoting them online.
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British writers scoring highly in huge US poll to find ‘Great American Read’15h British writers scoring highly in huge US poll to find ‘Great American Read’
Nationwide contest that has drawn millions of votes enters closing stages, with Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë and JK Rowling ranking high From Jane Eyre to Pride and Prejudice, a clutch of very British books have emerged as frontrunners for the title of the US’s best-loved novel, as a public poll that has seen millions cast their votes draws to a close. US public service broadcaster PBS
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Warung: the Brazilian paradise that had to fight for the right to party16h Warung: the Brazilian paradise that had to fight for the right to party
For its first 10 years, this remote mecca for house music battled nature and its neighbours to keep its doors open. Now it is bringing its distinct sound to Europe
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A Star Is Born outshines Venom and Johnny English at UK box office16h A Star Is Born outshines Venom and Johnny English at UK box office
The acclaimed romance starring Lady Gaga takes a late leap to the top spot as Neil Armstrong biopic First Man steps in at No 4 For its opening weekend at the UK box office, Bradley Cooper’s
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Review: ‘Charm City’ Vividly Captures the Streets of Baltimore16h Review: ‘Charm City’ Vividly Captures the Streets of Baltimore
Marilyn Ness’s documentary is dedicated to the memory of the more than 1,000 people said to be killed in Baltimore during the film’s making.
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Review: Paul Butterfield’s Story Is Told in ‘Horn From the Heart’16h Review: Paul Butterfield’s Story Is Told in ‘Horn From the Heart’
A documentary explores the life of the blues musician who was prominent in the 1960s and ’70s.
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Review: ‘Impulso’ Goes Backstage With a Flamenco Innovator16h Review: ‘Impulso’ Goes Backstage With a Flamenco Innovator
This documentary follows Rocío Molina, a cutting-edge dancer, as she prepares for a Paris show.
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Ant McPartlin and Lisa Armstrong granted a divorce17h Updated Ant McPartlin and Lisa Armstrong granted a divorce
The decision, ending the 11-year marriage, was made by a judge at a central London court in under 30 seconds.
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Best of Late Night: Stephen Colbert Says Warren’s DNA Test Reveals She ‘Is Running for President’17h Best of Late Night: Stephen Colbert Says Warren’s DNA Test Reveals She ‘Is Running for President’
Colbert focused on President Trump’s pledge to give $1 million to a charity of Senator Elizabeth Warren’s choosing if she could prove her Native American ancestry.
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Whisper it … The Good Place might need divine intervention17h Whisper it … The Good Place might need divine intervention
Season one of The Good Place was fantastic, season two was awe-inspiring. How could season three top it? Short answer: it hasn’t
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Kamila Shamsie on Trench Brothers: an ode to whitewashed war heroes17h Kamila Shamsie on Trench Brothers: an ode to whitewashed war heroes
The stories of more than a million men who fought in the first world war for Britain – and against racism in their own ranks – have gone untold. A new theatre show sets the record straight History does not record whether there was any contact during the first world war between the men of the Indian army who were being treated in hospitals in Brighton for injuries sustained on the western front and the men of the British West Indian regiment training further along the Sussex coast in Seaford. If there was, they’d have had much to discuss, both in terms of the camaraderie between soldiers and the racial discrimination that followed these men who had volunteered to fight for the empire.
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Ant McPartlin granted divorce from Lisa Armstrong18h Ant McPartlin granted divorce from Lisa Armstrong
The decision was made by a judge at the Central Family Court in London on Tuesday morning.
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‘The three-day benders would put me in hospital now’: why I left the 90s music scene behind18h ‘The three-day benders would put me in hospital now’: why I left the 90s music scene behind
John Niven lived every part of the rock’n’roll lifestyle. Then one day at a gig, aged 35, he saw the fate awaiting him … The playwright Jez Butterworth (Jerusalem, Mojo) and the musician Alex James (Blur, cheese) were staggering out of the Groucho Club back in the late 90s when they had the realisation that they were both nearly 30 – positively youthful for a playwright, but in rock’n’roll terms, a veritable Methuselah. Boxing, as Marsellus Wallace forcefully reminds the ageing prize fighter Butch in Pulp Fiction, is not an industry where people grow old gracefully. “See, this business is filled to the brim with unrealistic motherfuckers. Motherfuckers who thought their ass would age like wine. If you mean it turns to vinegar, it does. If you mean it gets better with age, it don’t.”
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A star is reborn: what we can learn from actor-turned-director debuts18h A star is reborn: what we can learn from actor-turned-director debuts
As Bradley Cooper and Jonah Hill step behind the camera for A Star is Born and Mid90s, how do their films benefit from their A-list status? A critic will often watch a director’s first film with one eye on what is and one on what might be. For novice feature film-makers, a debut doubles as a diagnostic, an opportunity to show potential as much as present skill. Because first-timers often have to work within constricting parameters – a finite budget, a caliber of actors commensurate with that budget, limited access to the resources of a studio – viewers will give a little leeway in the understanding that they’re watching the film the director was able to make until he or she gets the green light to make the film they truly want
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Sculpting With Bodies at American Ballet Theater18h Sculpting With Bodies at American Ballet Theater
The choreographer Jessica Lang, who is as interested in imagining shapes and compositions onstage as in inventing steps, makes her second work for the company.
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Fiction: A Psychedelic Epic That Wants to Consume the World18h Fiction: A Psychedelic Epic That Wants to Consume the World
“CoDex 1962,” by the Icelandic cult writer Sjon, is a trippy, philosophical, shaggy-dog novel combining a love story, a crime mystery and a science-fiction thriller in one.
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Fiction: In Haruki Murakami’s New Novel, a Painter’s Inspiration Is Supernatural18h Fiction: In Haruki Murakami’s New Novel, a Painter’s Inspiration Is Supernatural
The Japanese novelist’s latest book, “Killing Commendatore,” features a stymied artist, a haunted painting and a host of paranormal mysteries.
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Round Table: 3 Writers on the Emotional Toll of Being Undocumented18h Round Table: 3 Writers on the Emotional Toll of Being Undocumented
New books by Jose Antonio Vargas, José Olivarez and Julissa Arce explore what being part of mixed-status families, in which either they or their relatives were undocumented, has meant to them.
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From Cat Power to Coldplay: the best, worst and weirdest Rihanna covers19h From Cat Power to Coldplay: the best, worst and weirdest Rihanna covers
The Last Shadow Puppets turned vampiric, Harry Styles harked back to prog rock and Patti Smith was overcome by nerves … How 15 acts laid down their love for the queen of R&B Continuing her run of sublime cover versions (there have been two albums of them), the second single from Chan Marshall AKA
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Piers Morgan mocks Daniel Craig for carrying baby19h Piers Morgan mocks Daniel Craig for carrying baby
The TV hosts questions the James Bond star's masculinity - and social media erupts.
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Can BBC Informer finally subvert the Muslim stereotype problem on TV?19h Can BBC Informer finally subvert the Muslim stereotype problem on TV?
From oppressed wives to crazed jihadists, TV’s Islamophobia is rife. Nabhaan Rizwan stars in the new BBC thriller hoping to change the narrative
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The Conners: how does Roseanne survive without Roseanne Barr?19h The Conners: how does Roseanne survive without Roseanne Barr?
The retooled sitcom brings back the cast that surrounded the disgraced star for a competently realized, if formula-reliant look at suburban life without a matriarch In the wake of Roseanne’s cancelation last May, following racist tweets sent out by star and producer Roseanne Barr, many observers took to the site of her downfall to joke about looking forward to the show’s eventual return under the new title Dan. Those jokes proved to be pretty on-the-money, although the latest iteration of the series is called The Conners. It brings the rest of its cast back intact – John Goodman as the gruff-but-loving patriarch Dan; recent Oscar-nominee Laurie Metcalf as aloof Aunt Jackie; Sara Gilbert and Lecy Goranson as night-and-day sisters Darlene and Becky; Michael Fishman as the constantly ignored DJ; and the various newcomers and guest stars (including Johnny Galecki, Juliette Lewis and Mary Steenburgen) that make up their various kids, partners, exes, friends, neighbors and co-workers – as well as its trademark brand of character-driven humor suffused with working-class melancholy. It also retains its interest in issue-driven storylines (the two episodes screened early for critics, one and four, deal with addiction, sex, sexual orientation, healthcare and job security), while this time avoiding any explicit mention of current controversies and figures (ie there’s no mention of Trump).
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Neon and corporate dystopias: why does cyberpunk refuse to move on?20h Neon and corporate dystopias: why does cyberpunk refuse to move on?
Repeatedly reproduced and reimagined since the 80s, the tropes of cyberpunk must evolve or die The future has looked the same for almost four decades. A skyline of densely packed skyscrapers, corporate logos lighting the night sky, proclaiming ownership over the city below. At street level, a haze of neon shines down from the cluster of signs above and shimmers at your feet in the rain that runs down the filthy streets. Here, the have-nots, excluded from the safe, luxurious enclaves enjoyed by the super-rich, are preyed upon by hustlers dealing in illegal tech and street gangs composed of green-haired, leather-clad technopunks, decked out with cyborg enhancements and high on synthetic drugs. You know this city. You’ve seen it a million times since it was first constructed in the 80s by the pioneers of cyberpunk, most notably William Gibson in Neuromancer and Ridley Scott in Blade Runner. Hollywood recently returned to it with Blade Runner 2049. In the first episode of Netflix’s Altered Carbon, an adaptation of Richard K. Morgan’s 2002 novel, protagonist Takeshi Kovacs gazes upon it from his window; fire flickers from the top of a tall tower, just as it did in opening scene of Blade Runner, prompting a double-take where you wonder whether the window is actually a screen replaying Scott’s movie.
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Square Eyes by Anna Mill and Luke Jones review – dystopia to die for20h Square Eyes by Anna Mill and Luke Jones review – dystopia to die for
A tech pioneer loses control of her creation in this striking, intoxicating bookI’m always telling people how little time, relatively speaking, it takes to read a graphic novel, something that can often make the experience all the more powerful. But I’d be lying if I told you that
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Rembrandt’s ‘Night Watch’ to Undergo Years of Restoration21h Rembrandt’s ‘Night Watch’ to Undergo Years of Restoration
The portrait holds pride of place in the Rijksmuseum, the Dutch national museum, and will remain on display so the public can see the process.
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I’m a Joke and So Are You by Robin Ince review – beyond a joke and into our brains21h I’m a Joke and So Are You by Robin Ince review – beyond a joke and into our brains
Comedian Robin Ince uses his profession as a springboard to an exploration of the human mindRobin Ince is quite possibly the UK’s best-read comedian and is certainly one of the most criminally undercelebrated. If I had my way, he’d have his own show on primetime television at least twice a week, with the impressive array of guests from the worlds of science and entertainment that he lines up for his live variety shows. For more than a decade, this becardiganed polymath has been expanding the universe of standup, his interest in cosmology and neuroscience leading to collaborations with eminent scientists. Now Ince has turned his voracious curiosity to the subject of consciousness, in his first book. He wants to understand why we humans struggle so much with our sense of who we are: impostor syndrome, masks, daydreaming, anxiety. More specifically, he wants to understand these things as they relate to his own specific subset of humans, comedians, who often seem to embody our frailties and vanities writ large.
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From Judi to Edna: the women who electrified the 70s – in pictures21h From Judi to Edna: the women who electrified the 70s – in pictures
In 1977, the National Portrait Gallery staged a landmark exhibition, featuring 90 portraits of eminent British women photographed by Mayotte Magnus. The gallery is now updating the project with Illuminating Women, which runs until 24 March
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Jean-Michel Jarre: how we made Oxygène22h Jean-Michel Jarre: how we made Oxygène
‘Hi-fi shops played it as an example of state-of-the-art music. I didn’t tell them I made it with Sellotape in my kitchen’ I played in rock bands as a teenager and would use a tape machine my grandfather gave me to get processed sounds out of my guitar. During the
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What’s on TV: ‘The Kids Are Alright’ and ‘The Blair Witch Project’22h What’s on TV: ‘The Kids Are Alright’ and ‘The Blair Witch Project’
Brace for a packed house in “The Kids are Alright,” and experience horror firsthand in “The Blair Witch Project.”
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Review: In ‘Fireflies,’ the Preacher’s Wife Gets Her Say26h Review: In ‘Fireflies,’ the Preacher’s Wife Gets Her Say
Donja R. Love’s fantasia on the married life of a great civil rights orator suggests the price paid by the woman who gives him his voice.
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The Mysteries: Six towns, six stories... one England?26h The Mysteries: Six towns, six stories... one England?
A road trip around English towns and cities results in six plays summing up the state of the nation.
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Celebrating 60 years of Blue Peter in pictures26h Celebrating 60 years of Blue Peter in pictures
We look back over six decades of the world's longest running children's television show.
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Critic’s Pick: Review: ‘Rags Parkland’ Plays the Interplanetary Homesick Blues27h Critic’s Pick: Review: ‘Rags Parkland’ Plays the Interplanetary Homesick Blues
A folk concert provides the scaffolding for this stealthily moving sci-fi musical.
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Blue Peter: Former hosts celebrate 60th birthday of TV series29h Blue Peter: Former hosts celebrate 60th birthday of TV series
Former hosts of the children's show remember the gaffes and the laughs in a BBC One Show special to mark the anniversary.
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Pete Davidson and Ariana Grande Split Up: Your Monday Pop Culture Cheat Sheet31h Pete Davidson and Ariana Grande Split Up: Your Monday Pop Culture Cheat Sheet
What you need to know from today’s TV, music and movie news.
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Think Tim Jones’s Cosmic R&B Is Weird? Wait Until You Meet His Dummy32h Think Tim Jones’s Cosmic R&B Is Weird? Wait Until You Meet His Dummy
A new reissue shines a light on Jones, known as Preacherman, an obscure musician who has spent four decades fashioning his own instruments and philosophy.
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Nonfiction: Kurt Eichenwald’s Memoir of a ‘Mind Unraveled’33h Nonfiction: Kurt Eichenwald’s Memoir of a ‘Mind Unraveled’
A journalist’s traumatic story of epilepsy and his struggle to have it treated seriously, and properly, in his college years.
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‘A Star Is Born’ Soundtrack Gives Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper a No. 1 Album34h ‘A Star Is Born’ Soundtrack Gives Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper a No. 1 Album
Songs from the movie, including the rising hit “Shallow,” were bought and streamed enough to top the Billboard 200.
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Review: A Put-Upon Nanny Erupts in Todd Solondz’s ‘Emma and Max’34h Review: A Put-Upon Nanny Erupts in Todd Solondz’s ‘Emma and Max’
This strident satire from the filmmaker behind “Happiness” and “Wiener-Dog” is perfectly staged — and all too obvious.
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Books of The Times: Barbara Kingsolver’s New Novel Moves Between the Distant Past and the Troubled Present35h Books of The Times: Barbara Kingsolver’s New Novel Moves Between the Distant Past and the Troubled Present
“Unsheltered” threads the story of a present-day family struggling in New Jersey with that of a 19th-century science teacher who had lived on the same property.
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Review: A ‘Lost Highway’ Suite Refracts David Lynch35h Review: A ‘Lost Highway’ Suite Refracts David Lynch
Olga Neuwirth’s instrumental work, drawn from her 2003 opera, shows off the impressive capabilities of the experimental art center Empac.
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Punching mirrors and scrapbooking: things people only do in the movies35h Punching mirrors and scrapbooking: things people only do in the movies
Actor Lili Reinhart asked Twitter if it’s only in films that people in a panic splash water on their faces. But what are the other scenarios we only ever see on screen? Suspension of disbelief comes with the territory when we enter a cinema. Action heroes always emerge unscathed from a hail of bullets, while everyone in a musical, even the passersby, will know all the steps in an apparently spontaneous dance routine. But what of the behavioural eccentricities restricted to the screen? The Riverdale actor Lili Reinhart wondered this week if it is
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Iron Fist: What went wrong with the Netflix show?35h Iron Fist: What went wrong with the Netflix show?
Iron Fist has become the first Marvel Netflix show to be cancelled - fans tell us why.
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Bryan Adams concert photograph shows off Delhi pollution35h Bryan Adams concert photograph shows off Delhi pollution
The Canadian singer-songwriter shares an image of his "ghost" cast over an Indian concert crowd.
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Piano Stars Gather for a Legend’s 90th36h Piano Stars Gather for a Legend’s 90th
The virtuoso Gary Graffman, the teacher of Yuja Wang and Lang Lang, celebrated his birthday with musical royalty (and a grand-piano “Happy Birthday to You”).
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Manic Street Preachers, Gruff Rhys and Gwenno up for 2018 Welsh music prize36h Manic Street Preachers, Gruff Rhys and Gwenno up for 2018 Welsh music prize
Shortlist for this year’s prestigious award by a Welsh artist also includes lesser-known bands Toby Hay, Bryde and Astroid Boy
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PG Wodehouse fans delighted at plans for Westminster Abbey tribute37h PG Wodehouse fans delighted at plans for Westminster Abbey tribute
Ben Schott, author of a new Jeeves and Wooster novel, reported ‘a ripple of joy’ at the Wodehouse Society dinner when the tribute was announced Westminster Abbey’s plans to dedicate a memorial to PG Wodehouse 43 years after his death have been welcomed by the Wodehouse Society and by Ben Schott, who described the Jeeves and Wooster creator as the “personification of a very specific breed of English writing”. Schott is author of the bestselling trivia collection Schott’s Original Miscellany, and his officially sanctioned “Wodehouse” novel Jeeves and the King of Clubs will be published next month. He said that when the news was announced to the Wodehouse Society dinner that the Dean of Westminster had given permission for a memorial to Wodehouse in the abbey, “there was a ripple of joy that it was happening, but also puzzlement that it hadn’t happened before”.
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Meghan pregnant and expecting royal baby next spring37h Updated Meghan pregnant and expecting royal baby next spring
The Duchess of Sussex is due to give birth in the spring, Kensington Palace says.
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Captain Cook finds land and loses his breeches: Lisa Reihana on her video epic37h Captain Cook finds land and loses his breeches: Lisa Reihana on her video epic
The leading New Zealand artist explains why she turned the explorer into a woman – and relives the time her friend threw a wet T-shirt at the Queen
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Nonfiction: The Library Fire That Ignited an Author’s Imagination37h Nonfiction: The Library Fire That Ignited an Author’s Imagination
Susan Orlean’s “The Library Book” is an absorbing account of the 1986 fire that devastated the Los Angeles Central Library and a homage to libraries everywhere.
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Happy 60th birthday Blue Peter – from a proud former guest37h Happy 60th birthday Blue Peter – from a proud former guest
As a young girl, Zoe Williams was invited on to the show to sing carols as a man threw fake snow in her face. She recalls her favourite moments, from the out-of-control Brownie bonfire – to Anthea Turner’s cardboard Thunderbirds island Blue Peter was created exactly 60 years ago by a man with a name like a limerick, John Hunter Blair. Despite its high formality – presenters buttoned up like teachers, voices like newscasters but more cheerful – the show had a radical format. It took a novel view of children, regarding them as an audience with their own tastes and interests, rather than as interim humans to be quieted while you waited for them to see sense. The one constant across the decades has been viewer participation, with its rather broad invitation to send in literally anything interesting – a poem perhaps, or a fascinating rock. Or even yourself: for to be invited into the studio for any purpose was, and perhaps remains, the most exciting thing that could happen to a child. And that’s what happened to me in 1983.
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Bryan Singer rebuts as-yet-unpublished Esquire article37h Bryan Singer rebuts as-yet-unpublished Esquire article
Director of The Usual Suspects and Bohemian Rhapsody accuses magazine of ‘rehashing false accusations’ Director
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Strike Over, Lyric Opera of Chicago Can Resume Business38h Strike Over, Lyric Opera of Chicago Can Resume Business
Five days after going on strike, the orchestra agreed to a contract with fewer weeks of work and fewer full-time players, but a higher weekly salary.
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How the return of a deceased character spelt the end for Hollyoaks39h How the return of a deceased character spelt the end for Hollyoaks
It’s had fireball car crashes, kidnapping and serial killers, but Mr Cunningham’s reappearance as a ghost took the show from quirky to ridiculous Hollyoaks started in 1995 – a time when soaps were starting to switch from gentle stories about Betty’s hotpot or comedy skits about Wellard running riot in The Vic to full-on attempts to shock Britain’s soap fans. Brookside had a lesbian kiss (gasp!) and a body buried under the patio? Well, newcomer Hollyoaks kicked off with a fireball car crash and since then has had everything from serial killers to kidnaps to twin-incest (twincest?) to edgy late-night specials. What we’re saying is: Hollyoaks jumped the shark almost straight away, and continues to bounce merrily over it almost weekly 23 years later. And that’s why it’s incredible. Over the years, we’ve had nice guy Kurt ditching drug dealer Rob in the middle of the Atlantic, only for him to swim all the way back and try to drown Tony in a nautical watertank; loved-up couple Beth and Rhys discovering they are half-siblings but deciding to keep having sex; Mercedes returning from the dead; and a fatal maze fire. The village is particularly risky for twins: serial rapist Sam escapes from prison to burn down The Dog in the Pond pub and kills twin victims Sophie and Mel; and another set of twins (Dodger and Sienna) have a one-night stand resulting in a daughter before discovering they are related.
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Meghan and Harry: Duchess of Sussex expecting a baby40h Updated Meghan and Harry: Duchess of Sussex expecting a baby
The Duchess of Sussex is due to give birth in the spring, Kensington Palace says.
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There She Goes: the brutal new comedy busting motherhood myths41h There She Goes: the brutal new comedy busting motherhood myths
This outrageously funny BBC Four show about raising a child with learning difficulties shines a light on the desolation often felt in early motherhood There is a devastating moment in BBC4’s forthcoming comedy,
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Not the Booker prize 2018: Raising Sparks by Ariel Kahn leads field42h Not the Booker prize 2018: Raising Sparks by Ariel Kahn leads field
Readers have voted for this novel of faith and reconciliation. Will our judging panel agree? The public vote is in. And, oh boy. It’s close. Here are the tallies:
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Katie Hopkins musical wins UK Theatre Award43h Katie Hopkins musical wins UK Theatre Award
A show named after the divisive columnist is recognised at an event celebrating theatre outside London.
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Twenty One Pilots Want to Stay Strange43h Twenty One Pilots Want to Stay Strange
Two years ago, the Columbus band unexpectedly broke out big with the anxiety anthems of “Blurryface.” Can they keep doing things their own way in the face of mass success?
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Man Booker prize shortlist 2018: how do the final six stand up?44h Man Booker prize shortlist 2018: how do the final six stand up?
The thrilling diversity of the longlist is gone, and picking a winner remains a fool’s game, but this year’s last half-dozen are all worthy contendersIt’s hard not to feel that the cull from Man Booker longlist to shortlist was a calculated effort by the judges to strip this latest round of “posh bingo”, as Julian Barnes famously dubbed the prize, of its excitement. The longlist not only contained a number of extraordinary novels, it also seemed constructed to celebrate younger writers – six of the 13 longlisted authors were 40 or under, with two in their 20s. The longlist asked us to reconsider both what we think of as literary writing – one sensed the presence of judge Val McDermid in the selection of
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Pict warriors and balloon-headed clowns: the 11 best games on Xbox One45h Pict warriors and balloon-headed clowns: the 11 best games on Xbox One
From the thrills of Forza Horizon and cartoon antics of Cuphead to the horrors of Hellblade, here are the Xbox One games everyone should play Explore an astonishingly beautiful re-creation of Britain in an impressive roster of cars, taking in everything from rally racing in the Lake District to street races in a wintry Edinburgh. The ultimate driving game on Xbox One (or anywhere).
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Streaming: where to find the best space films45h Streaming: where to find the best space films
From a 50s sci-fi curio to Hollywood blockbusters, there have been giant leaps in films that reach for the moon
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Being John Lennon: A Restless Life by Ray Connolly review – just a complicated guy45h Being John Lennon: A Restless Life by Ray Connolly review – just a complicated guy
A fascinating new biography by a journalist who knew Lennon in the 60s and 70s captures his contradictory traitsThere are several “definitive” biographies of John Lennon, and even more tomes claiming to provide the ultimate lowdown on the Beatles’ well-documented career. The
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How Fascism Works review: a vital read for a nation under Trump46h How Fascism Works review: a vital read for a nation under Trump
Yale professor Jason Stanley enters a growing literary field with a sober examination of an inflammatory political concept One of the insidious ironies of fascist politics, the
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What’s on TV Monday: ‘The Sentence’ and ‘Fantastic Mr. Fox’46h What’s on TV Monday: ‘The Sentence’ and ‘Fantastic Mr. Fox’
Prepare to shed a few tears during “The Sentence,” and watch a foxy George Clooney.
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Polish film The Clergy sparks hundreds of allegations of abuse47h Polish film The Clergy sparks hundreds of allegations of abuse
Based on real events, Kler has broken box office records and divided Catholic country A film depicting Polish clerics as corrupt, drunken fornicators and paedophiles is smashing box office records in Poland, sparking controversy and encouraging hundreds of people to come forward with allegations of recent and historical abuse. Based on real events, Kler (The Clergy), by the director Wojciech Smarzowski, which includes testimonies of survivors, features an alcoholic priest who encourages his lover to have an abortion, a priest accused of abusing a young boy, a senior cleric engaged in corruption and blackmail, and a grotesque, foul-mouthed archbishop cutting deals with politicians and mobsters, all operating with impunity against the backdrop of a passive and credulous society portrayed as complicit in the crimes being committed.
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