Back Arts Sunday, June 16, 2019
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Review: Rebooting ‘Das Boot,’ on Land and Sea2h Review: Rebooting ‘Das Boot,’ on Land and Sea
A new Hulu series revives the popular World War II submarine saga, with some changes.
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Moisés Kaufman: A Dangerous Euphoria2h Updated Moisés Kaufman: A Dangerous Euphoria
The award-winning playwright and director looks hopefully and cautiously toward the future of L.G.B.T.Q. equality.
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‘Euphoria’ Review: HBO Raises the Stakes on Teenage Transgression4h ‘Euphoria’ Review: HBO Raises the Stakes on Teenage Transgression
Sex and drugs and more sex and drugs, but also some dark humor and tender romance in a complicated ensemble drama.
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4h Updated Review: The Wrenching ‘Fire Shut Up in My Bones’ Becomes an Opera
This new work, with music by Terence Blanchard and a libretto by Kasi Lemmons, is a bold and affecting adaptation of Charles Blow’s memoir.
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Review: In ‘Pathetic,’ a Retelling of Racine, Love Hurts4h Review: In ‘Pathetic,’ a Retelling of Racine, Love Hurts
Julia Jarcho’s new play is a squirmy, sinister meditation on female desire, with a whiff of ancient Greece.
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Review: ‘The Central Park Five’ Turns Injustice Into Opera5h Updated Review: ‘The Central Park Five’ Turns Injustice Into Opera
Donald Trump is a character in Anthony Davis’s jazz-infused adaptation of this true story of wrongful conviction.
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Lil’ Buck Sinegal, Noted Louisiana Guitarist, Dies at 755h Updated Lil’ Buck Sinegal, Noted Louisiana Guitarist, Dies at 75
He worked with Allen Toussaint, Buckwheat Zydeco, Clifton Chenier and more. He has been called “the best guitar slinger South Louisiana has to offer.”
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6h Updated Susannah Hunnewell, Publisher of The Paris Review, Dies at 52
She had been a member of its literary circles since joining it as an intern under its editor George Plimpton.
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Europe or bust: why Laure Prouvost wants us to dig our way out of Brexit7h Europe or bust: why Laure Prouvost wants us to dig our way out of Brexit
Her first impulse was to cover the London underground in breasts – but instead the Turner prize-winner is urging commuters to pick up shovels. We crawled inside her studio to find out more ... You must stoop to access
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New York’s Tribute to the ‘Tombs Angel’: Lost, Found, Now Restored8h New York’s Tribute to the ‘Tombs Angel’: Lost, Found, Now Restored
A long-forgotten monument to a woman who helped inmates in New York’s infamous 19th-century jail is to be installed in a courthouse lobby.
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This Storm by James Ellroy review – Nazis, orgies and Orson Welles9h This Storm by James Ellroy review – Nazis, orgies and Orson Welles
The latest instalment of the writer’s blood-soaked alternative history of the US rewards the attentiveSet in Los Angeles in 1942, the latest instalment in James Ellroy’s occult saga of US history centres on Irish-born police sergeant Dudley Smith, a closet Nazi using his rank as a front for activities including drug running and people trafficking. In his day job, he’s coordinating a manhunt for a blood-drinking necrophile, Tommy Glennon, though Smith’s real reason for wanting to find him isn’t the obvious one, having more to do with Glennon witnessing what Smith once got up to at a Nazi orgy in the company of Orson Welles.
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In ‘City on a Hill,’ a Crime-Ridden Boston Before the ‘Miracle’9h In ‘City on a Hill,’ a Crime-Ridden Boston Before the ‘Miracle’
The new Showtime series sets a procedural against the backdrop of a particularly fraught era in the city’s history.
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Frozen in Time: Sophia Loren, London, June 196010h Frozen in Time: Sophia Loren, London, June 1960
On the set of The Millionairess, the Italian star blends in with the East End locals and discover the joy of whelks Three sets of diamonds, emeralds and rubies were among the jewels stolen from Sophia Loren as she filmed
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Vivian by Christina Hesselholdt review – flash portrait11h Vivian by Christina Hesselholdt review – flash portrait
This fictionalised account of the secret street photographer Vivian Maier’s life is playful but unfocusedWhen the American photographer
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Franco Zeffirelli: The 9 Films and Operas That Defined a Director12h Updated Franco Zeffirelli: The 9 Films and Operas That Defined a Director
His sumptuous, realistic style suited a classic “Romeo and Juliet” film and productions of “La Traviata” and “La Bohème.”
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Lena Headey: ‘I wanted a better death for Cersei’12h Lena Headey: ‘I wanted a better death for Cersei’
The actor hasn’t stood still since Game of Thrones ended. There’s her short film, her work with refugees – and there’s always another tattoo…Lena Headey has been an actor for the better part of three decades, but the experience has not eased the doubt she has in her abilities. And even near-universal praise of the kind she received for her portrayal of Cersei Lannister in
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10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak review – powerful but preachy13h 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak review – powerful but preachy
The brave political novelist’s story of an Istanbul sex worker and her outcast friends is sensual but frustratingElif Shafak’s ninth novel in English tells the story of a Turkish woman reflecting on her life in the immediate moments after her brutal death. Leila, a fortysomething sex worker in Istanbul, has been murdered and dumped in a wheelie bin in the dark, damp outskirts of the city. But in the 10 minutes and 38 seconds after her heart stops beating, her mind continues to whirr, ranging over her memories, their scents and flavours. The novel, which opens in 1990, is not only a sensual journey into the complicated life of a prostitute known as “Tequila Leila” but the story of her cherished friends – five social outcasts who are also considered trash in an increasingly illiberal country. Shafak wants to give a voice to society’s untouchables: immigrants, underdogs and those who are considered freaks by their own families. “The Istanbul that Leila had known was not the Istanbul that the Ministry of Tourism would have wanted foreigners to see,” she writes.
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How indie bookshops are fighting back13h How indie bookshops are fighting back
Independent bookshops are thriving because they understand readers’ tastes better than an Amazon algorithmAs global temperatures rise at the rate political standards fall, the news that independent bookshops are reviving gives rare cause for celebration. Last year the number of indies on UK high streets grew for the second year running – by 15 to 883, according to the
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Fred Hersch & the WDR Big Band: Begin Again review – lyrical and terrifying14h Fred Hersch & the WDR Big Band: Begin Again review – lyrical and terrifying
(Palmetto) When the conversation turns to contemporary jazz pianists, the name of
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Sometime Always Never review – a triple-word score of a movie14h Sometime Always Never review – a triple-word score of a movie
Bill Nighy is a Scrabble-obsessed father grieving for a missing son in Frank Cottrell Boyce’s offbeat gem The presence of Bill Nighy, funeral-faced national treasure, will no doubt be a key selling point for this tragicomic drama. But the real star is behind the scenes. Screenwriter Frank Cottrell Boyce, who adapted the film from his own short story, has crafted a joy of a script, which seeds its themes as elegantly as Nighy’s character, Alan, a Scrabble-obsessed tailor, wears his suits. The danger of an offbeat British film, particularly one that is as emphatically designed as this, is that it could teeter into whimsy and artifice. But thanks to Cottrell Boyce, and the assured direction of first-time feature film-maker Carl Hunter, the emotional beats are authentic and the distinctive look of the film – it takes its aesthetic cues from 60s ties and 70s wallpaper – never upstages the story. Alan has spent his life preoccupied with the disappearance of his favourite son years before. Michael stormed out of the family home in a “nark” after a disagreement over a Scrabble game. The remaining son, Peter, (Sam Riley) has found himself measured against an absent rival in a competition he can never win. A childhood defined by “second best” – he played with Chad Valley Big League rather than Subbuteo – has shaped his adult life. The precision in the shot composition is mirrored in the storytelling – there’s an unassuming elegance that balances the eccentricity of a film that makes something as mundane as Scrabble into a taut dramatic device.
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The week in TV: The Handmaid’s Tale, Big Little Lies and more – review15h The week in TV: The Handmaid’s Tale, Big Little Lies and more – review
Elisabeth Moss blazes back to Gilead, Meryl Streep joins Big Little Lies, and the Women’s World Cup lays claim to the beautiful game
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The week in radio and podcasts: Gangster Capitalism: C13 Originals; Living Memory15h The week in radio and podcasts: Gangster Capitalism: C13 Originals; Living Memory
Andrew Jenks has produced an investigation into America’s college admissions scandal in impressive time. Plus the world’s brightest centenarians
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Oscar Murillo: ‘I want to hold up a mirror to this country’15h Oscar Murillo: ‘I want to hold up a mirror to this country’
The Turner prize nominee on socially engaged art, his Colombian heritage and why his family is part of his new Art Night show ‘Art and life – there is no separation between the two,” Oscar Murillo says. It is a line that stays in the mind although it is thrown out casually, part of a longer conversation. What is clear is that Murillo’s life is jammed with work to the point where art and life have become almost indistinguishable. He has a solo exhibition,
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My Seditious Heart by Arundhati Roy review – powerful, damning essays15h My Seditious Heart by Arundhati Roy review – powerful, damning essays
The Booker-winning Indian author casts an exacting eye over inequality, gender politics and imperialism With its gold-striped spine, crimson endpapers and silky leaves,
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TV tonight: petrolheads assemble ... Top Gear is back16h TV tonight: petrolheads assemble ... Top Gear is back
Andrew Flintoff and Paddy McGuinness join Chris Harris for a new incarnation of the motoring show. Plus it’s a Good Morning Britain grudge match in this year’s Soccer Aid. Here’s the evening’s best TV
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What’s on TV Sunday: ‘Euphoria’ and a Jo Koy Comedy Special16h What’s on TV Sunday: ‘Euphoria’ and a Jo Koy Comedy Special
A teenage drama starring Zendaya comes to HBO, and the comedian Jo Koy takes on millennial parenting in his second special on Netflix.
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Spice Girls: Geri apologises for quitting in 199819h Spice Girls: Geri apologises for quitting in 1998
Ginger Spice says she regrets leaving the band at the height of their fame, as their reunion tour ends.
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‘Shaft’ Made Richard Roundtree a Star. But Store Clerks Still Tailed Him.21h Updated ‘Shaft’ Made Richard Roundtree a Star. But Store Clerks Still Tailed Him.
Returning to the role he originated nearly 50 years ago, the 76-year-old actor considers its disorienting impact on his life.
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21h Updated In ‘Toy Story 4,’ the Animators Pulling the Strings Reveal Woody’s Inner Life
Computerized micro-tweaks to facial expressions and movements are as finely coordinated as a central nervous system and shaded with emotion.
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Franco Zeffirelli, Italian Director With Taste for Excess, Dies at 9623h Updated Franco Zeffirelli, Italian Director With Taste for Excess, Dies at 96
Mr. Zeffirelli’s opera productions sometimes drew critical ire, but audiences generally loved them. He worked in film, too.
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Italian film director Franco Zeffirelli dies at 9625h Updated Italian film director Franco Zeffirelli dies at 96
He directed stars including Elizabeth Taylor and opera greats such as Maria Callas.
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The Playlist: Taylor Swift Seeks Harmony, and 10 More New Songs26h Updated The Playlist: Taylor Swift Seeks Harmony, and 10 More New Songs
Hear tracks by Madonna, Sturgill Simpson, Vagabon and others.
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After Losing His Parents, an Author Wonders: Who and What Is Real?28h After Losing His Parents, an Author Wonders: Who and What Is Real?
In “Picnic Comma Lightning,” Laurence Scott combines a memoir about grief with an investigation into the ways technologies blur the line between public and private.
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Taffy Brodesser-Akner: ‘People really love how messy the truth is’28h Taffy Brodesser-Akner: ‘People really love how messy the truth is’
The journalist turned novelist on exorcising her fear of divorce, the state of gender relations, and reading Philip Roth at 11Taffy Brodesser-Akner is an award-winning American journalist who made her name writing profiles for magazines such as
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Shutter speeds: the cars of El Mirage – in pictures29h Shutter speeds: the cars of El Mirage – in pictures
El Mirage is a racetrack on a dry lake bed a few hours outside Los Angeles in the California desert. Raced on since 1937, the 1.3-mile track attracts drivers from all over the US, some of whom reach speeds of up to 200mph.
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Lesley Sharp: ‘Women in their 50s are regarded as having waning powers’29h Lesley Sharp: ‘Women in their 50s are regarded as having waning powers’
The theatre and TV star on how an untimely fire alarm led to her new role at the Royal Court – and the joy of swimmingLesley Sharp is one of the busiest, best and most recognisable of British actresses, with a career that spans
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Free TV licences cannot be saved with cuts to salaries, says BBC29h Updated Free TV licences cannot be saved with cuts to salaries, says BBC
The BBC says salary cuts would not plug the gap needed to fund free TV licences for the over-75s.
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Ballet BC Review: A Master Outshines His Disciples30h Updated Ballet BC Review: A Master Outshines His Disciples
William Forsythe’s style, where every limb is stretched and torqued, is more easily imitated than replicated.
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Pilobolus Returns to the Joyce, a Fascinating Species in Decline30h Updated Pilobolus Returns to the Joyce, a Fascinating Species in Decline
The troupe of mime-acrobats, presenting two programs after a five-year absence, feels like what it is: a late-generation copy.
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Sounds like summer: the ten best niche music festivals31h Sounds like summer: the ten best niche music festivals
Festival Fomo? Fear not. The big ones are sold out, but here’s our pick of the smaller gatherings that still have tickets
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We the Animals review – one of the discoveries of the year31h We the Animals review – one of the discoveries of the year
A young boy sees his family financially struggle while grappling with his sexuality in an outstanding coming-of-age drama There is a diaphanous beauty to this striking US indie; an impressionistic, free-spirited, skittish quality that belies the weight of the themes that it explores. A coming-of-age picture, viewed through the eyes of the youngest of three semi-feral brothers running wild in rural, up-state New York,
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31h Updated Keith Botsford, Man of Letters and Saul Bellow Associate, Dies at 90
He was an uncontainable writer (novelist, essayist, biographer and more), started magazines with Bellow and died almost a year ago, to little public notice.
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The fifth Beatle? Cynthia Lennon finally wins her place in pop history32h The fifth Beatle? Cynthia Lennon finally wins her place in pop history
John’s first wife has been written off as a mere support act. Now a new play recognises her importance in the story of the Beatles The true identity of the “fifth Beatle” is a contentious matter for fans of the Fab Four. The name of
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Blithe Spirit: Dame Judi to raise Britain’s spirits as Coward’s mystic madame32h Blithe Spirit: Dame Judi to raise Britain’s spirits as Coward’s mystic madame
New film of 1941 play hopes to heal a haunted countryIn 1941 when Britain was at the mercy of the Blitz, the staging of Noël Coward’s
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What Cambridge University taught us about racism33h What Cambridge University taught us about racism
Cambridge graduates Chelsea Kwakye and Ore Ogunbiyi have written a guide to help students – and it’s the second title published by Stormzy’s #Merky Books CChelsea Kwakye and Ore Ogunbiyi are the co-authors of
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Director Franco Zeffirelli dies at 96, Italian media report33h Director Franco Zeffirelli dies at 96, Italian media report
Film director and cultural icon Franco Zeffirelli dies aged 96, Italian media report.
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Despite #MeToo Glare, Efforts to Ban Secret Settlements Stop Short33h Updated Despite #MeToo Glare, Efforts to Ban Secret Settlements Stop Short
Twelve states have passed laws about nondisclosure agreements in sexual misconduct cases, but only one effectively neutralizes them.
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Franco Zeffirelli, revered Italian director, dies aged 9633h Franco Zeffirelli, revered Italian director, dies aged 96
Italian equally celebrated as director of films, theatre and opera over 60-year career
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Rock, Paper, Scissors and Other Stories by Maxim Osipov review – bleakly comic Russian tales34h Rock, Paper, Scissors and Other Stories by Maxim Osipov review – bleakly comic Russian tales
These extraordinary short stories of provincial life shine with a dark Chekhovian comedy Born in 1963, Maxim Osipov has been publishing his clear-eyed tales of life in contemporary Russia since 2007. His widely admired stories have won several prizes there and this extraordinary collection is his first to be translated into English. In the title story, a provincial teacher tries to make sense of his past. Many of the boys he once taught are now dead (“drugs, war, ‘business’ …”), and the people who control the town are cruel, dishonest, paranoid; nostalgic for old Soviet certainties. The story’s small town is a microcosm of modern Russia, where corruption permeates almost every thread of the social fabric and power is often synonymous with theft. Nobel prize-winner
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34h Updated ‘All That’ Returns With Its ’90s Wit and Shorter Skits
The new version of the Nickelodeon show revives sketches from its heyday. But will a new generation care about jokes made before they were born?
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Plucked from obscurity: why bluegrass is making a comeback35h Plucked from obscurity: why bluegrass is making a comeback
It was once derided as hillbilly music. How did bluegrass become the new sound of political protest across the US? You could tell Punch Brothers didn’t expect to win a Grammy this year – their frontman didn’t even turn up. Bluegrass doesn’t, historically, make much of a splash at the awards, and this year they were up against the renowned Joan Baez in the folk category. But something in their album,
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Bridget Jones’ Dairy: is Renée Zellweger’s What/If the cheesiest thing on TV?35h Bridget Jones’ Dairy: is Renée Zellweger’s What/If the cheesiest thing on TV?
A camp take on Indecent Proposal, this new Netflix drama is a ludicrous melange of soft-smut and property porn Now that
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Adwoa Aboah: ‘I thought I was hideous. I wanted to jump out of my skin’36h Adwoa Aboah: ‘I thought I was hideous. I wanted to jump out of my skin’
The supermodel turned mental-health activist on how battling dyslexia, drugs and depression helped her find her voice
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Kate Atkinson: ‘I live to entertain. I don’t live to teach or preach or to be political’36h Kate Atkinson: ‘I live to entertain. I don’t live to teach or preach or to be political’
After the success of Life After Life and A God in Ruins, the novelist shares why she is enjoying writing more as she gets older – and the return of detective Jackson Brodie After nearly 10 years, Kate Atkinson’s much-loved detective Jackson Brodie returns in her 12th novel
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Lisa Kudrow on The Comeback’s groundbreaking satire36h Lisa Kudrow on The Comeback’s groundbreaking satire
Why a post-Friends Kudrow and Sex and the City’s Michael Patrick King’s cult comedy is still as relevant as ever In May 2004, the actor Lisa Kudrow met her colleague Michael Patrick King for lunch in Los Angeles. Kudrow had just finished playing the part of Phoebe Buffay in Friends, and King had ended his run as director, writer and executive producer for Sex and the City. They had known each other for years and now they were considering working together. It should have been a match made in TV heaven but Kudrow brought a little bit of TV hell along to that lunch date, too. “He said: ‘I don’t imagine you want to do another show,’ and I said: ‘No,’” Kudrow recalls. “The only thing I would want to do was this … ” She then assumed the persona of a very different sort of performer: a jaded, craven, fading TV star, driven a little screwy by fame. “She’s really phoney,” Kudrow says. “She’s so desperate to be in the spotlight, and she’s missed it so much. She had this weird, continental-ish, theatre-y accent.”
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36h Democracy in Crisis
Larry Diamond’s “Ill Winds” warns that American freedom is threatened from both inside and out.
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36h Updated 11 of Our Best Weekend Reads
The biggest disaster in the music business. A reckoning for evangelicals. Billionaires with an unspeakable secret. The making of a YouTube radical. And more.
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Torn apart: the vicious war over young adult books37h Torn apart: the vicious war over young adult books
Authors who write about marginalised communities are facing abuse, boycotts and even death threats. What is cancel culture doing to young adult fiction? Earlier this month, the author and screenwriter Gareth Roberts announced that his story was being removed from a forthcoming
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The Week in Arts: One Ariana Grande, Two Stadiums; Toni Morrison on the Silver Screen39h The Week in Arts: One Ariana Grande, Two Stadiums; Toni Morrison on the Silver Screen
The recording artist headlines Madison Square Garden, a play plumbs the gay experience in Uganda and the Nobel Prize-winning novelist anchors a new documentary.
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The best (and worst) songs of the summer, from Rihanna to Las Ketchup39h The best (and worst) songs of the summer, from Rihanna to Las Ketchup
Every year has its anthem, be it Drake, Calvin Harris or Beyoncé, but which one is the best of the millennium so far? Security banned umbrellas from her gigs following complaints that people were getting poked in the eye. A summer song worth risking a cornea for, in our opinion.
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Thank You Very Much: how Elvis tribute acts inspired a dance show40h Thank You Very Much: how Elvis tribute acts inspired a dance show
Choreographer Claire Cunningham’s new piece, which premieres at Manchester international festival, pays tribute to tribute artists For
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What’s on TV Saturday: ‘The Hate U Give’ and ‘All That’40h What’s on TV Saturday: ‘The Hate U Give’ and ‘All That’
“The Hate U Give” comes to HBO. And the reboot of “All That” premieres on Nickelodeon.
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