Back Arts Sunday, November 17, 2019
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Best Supporting Grandma? For ‘The Farewell,’ an Oscar Campaign Begins2h Best Supporting Grandma? For ‘The Farewell,’ an Oscar Campaign Begins
Lulu Wang’s indie hit, starring Awkwafina and Zhao Shuzhen, may be an awards contender, but that doesn’t mean the film is easily categorized.
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Review: The Met’s ‘Figaro’ Looks Darker Than It Feels2h Updated Review: The Met’s ‘Figaro’ Looks Darker Than It Feels
At the Metropolitan Opera, Richard Eyre’s staging of the classic Mozart comedy seems imposing. But it comes off too mild.
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6h Will.i.am accuses Quantas flight attendant of racism
The US musician was met by police at Sydney airport after a disagreement with a flight attendant.
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The strange world of Aldous Harding: ‘I’ve always been driven by fear’10h The strange world of Aldous Harding: ‘I’ve always been driven by fear’
The New Zealander can be an unnerving presence. She’s also one of the most original songwriters around. She talks about Meatloaf, Apocalypse Now… and why her generation is so frightenedLook into
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The Amazing Johnathan Documentary review – an enjoyably shambolic doc11h The Amazing Johnathan Documentary review – an enjoyably shambolic doc
Director Benjamin Berman is hopelessly out of his depth following a death-defying, meth-addicted comedian It’s hard to know what kind of story first-time documentary film-maker Benjamin Berman was expecting to tell when he set out to make a film about John Edward Szeles, better known as comedian and magician
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Micheal Ward: ‘Everywhere I go it’s good vibes’12h Micheal Ward: ‘Everywhere I go it’s good vibes’
In just a year, Micheal Ward has risen from online model to leading man in the crime drama Blue Story. He still can’t believe it – nor can his mum A few hours before I’m due to meet Micheal Ward, I get a text from his publicist. The photoshoot for this interview has finished more than an hour early – could I come a bit sooner? I race to a café in Blackheath, plush south London. When I arrive, Ward has already finished lunch. These shoots normally overrun, I say. How come this one was over so quickly? “I tried to warn them I was a model,” he smirks. “I know what I’m doing.” He certainly seems to. A year ago, Ward was entirely unknown as an actor. He was working for the e-commerce sites of brands like JD Sports, modelling athleisure. (Apparently there’s still a picture of him somewhere, deep in the bowels of the JD sports website.) Now 21, he’s bagged leading roles in two of the most high-profile portrayals of British gang life in years. In the first, Netflix’s revival of
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The week in theatre: Mary Poppins; Murder in the Cathedral; Much Ado About Nothing – review12h The week in theatre: Mary Poppins; Murder in the Cathedral; Much Ado About Nothing – review
Prince Edward theatre; Southwark Cathedral; Wilton’s Music Hall, London
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The Report review – claustrophobic tale of CIA interrogation failures12h The Report review – claustrophobic tale of CIA interrogation failures
This fact-based thriller about a US Senate investigation gets caught up in the detail An excellent Adam Driver ties himself into knots of frustration in this factually based account of the Senate investigation into the CIA’s post 9/11 EIT (Enhanced Interrogation programme), a fiercely unforging denunciation. Writer and director Scott Z Burns condenses approaching 7,000 pages of information into an involving drama that has a kinship with films such as
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Photographer Pat Martin: ‘Mom was not an easy subject’13h Photographer Pat Martin: ‘Mom was not an easy subject’
The American winner of the 2019 Taylor Wessing portrait prize tells the story behind his extraordinary portraits of his troubled mother In 2015, while standing in front of a series of portraits by the American photographer Larry Sultan in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Pat Martin suddenly found himself in tears. “For weeks my friends had been telling me, ‘You have to see the Sultan retrospective, you’ll love it,’” he recalls. “And I did, but it triggered me. It was the first time I cried from seeing photographs that weren’t personal to me.” The portraits in question were of Sultan’s elderly parents, whom he had photographed throughout the 1980s when they were living in a retirement community in Palm Springs. He called the series
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Cliff face challenge to rescue Ethiopian church paintings13h Cliff face challenge to rescue Ethiopian church paintings
Conservation experts tackle risky climbs to save art that dates back to the 12th century Stephen Rickerby and Lisa Shekede need a head for heights. As
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Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy: I Made a Place review – older, wiser and happier14h Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy: I Made a Place review – older, wiser and happier
(Drag City)“Looking for a recommendation for an artist residency that takes small families with two working artist parents?”
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McMafia returns to take on Trump’s America14h McMafia returns to take on Trump’s America
Market forces relocate the second series of McMafia to the US, while the Saatchi Gallery charges top dollar to see King Tut
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‘S.N.L.’ Turns Impeachment Inquiry Into a Soap Opera Starring Jon Hamm14h ‘S.N.L.’ Turns Impeachment Inquiry Into a Soap Opera Starring Jon Hamm
“Days of Our Impeachment” opened the episode, and Harry Styles did double duty as the host and musical guest.
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Marriage Story review – Noah Baumbach’s best film yet15h Marriage Story review – Noah Baumbach’s best film yet
Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver excel as a couple caught in the storm of an increasingly vicious – and often hilarious – separation in Baumbach’s bittersweet heartbreaker Writer-director Noah Baumbach first gained widespread critical acclaim with
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Naomie Harris: ‘I just want to be myself’15h Naomie Harris: ‘I just want to be myself’
Naomie Harris is one of Hollywood’s most ‘un-actory’ celebrities. Here she talks about Oxfam partywear, the Windrush scandal and bringing 007 up to date Think of all the clothes that are thrown out every day. The sock that sprung a hole in the toe. The trousers that shrunk in the dryer. The daring top you bought on a whim and never summoned the confidence to wear. According to a 2017 survey, Britons throw out 300,000 tonnes of clothes a year, representing an annual value of around £12.5bn – which is close to the £350m a week Boris Johnson once pledged to the NHS in Brexit savings. That’s a lot of nurses. Now imagine you had chosen to donate your clothes to
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15h Northampton drag queen Pure finds Norwich Euphoria for her first show
Pure is "so ready" to step on stage for the first time as drag helps her overcome bullying.
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Last Christmas review – cliched festive failure16h Last Christmas review – cliched festive failure
George Michael’s music is wasted in Paul Feig’s comedy of excruciating life lessons The music of George Michael and Wham! is hauled out on to the soundtrack of this mouldy tangerine of a movie with about the same level of care and sensitivity that you might find on the festive mixtape at a motorway service station. Say what you will about
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The big picture: alone in the airport16h The big picture: alone in the airport
The loneliness of the long-distance traveller, captured by photographer Harry Gruyaert The Belgian photographer
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17h What’s on TV Sunday: ‘The Crown’ and ‘Man in the High Castle’
Olivia Colman takes the throne in Season 3 of “The Crown.” And Amazon’s alternative history series comes to an end.
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24h Updated ‘The Report’ and the Untold Story of a Senate-C.I.A. Conflict
The Adam Driver film dramatizes a contentious investigation into post-9/11 torture. But it leaves out a tense episode that could have buried the results altogether.
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Conserving Plymouth: the city that dared to dream30h Conserving Plymouth: the city that dared to dream
Even as the blitz reduced the historic Devon port city to rubble, plans were afoot for major reconstruction. Now its remarkable hybrid city centre has been designated as a conservation area It’s a recurrent yearning, after an urban catastrophe, to rebuild better than before, to take the opportunity to clear away the mistakes of the past. Phoenixes tend to get mentioned, and their well-known ability to rise from ashes. Often it doesn’t work out as planned. Vested interests muscle in. The exigencies of recovery take over from high ideals. Christopher Wren’s thwarted attempt to rebuild London along more rational lines, after the great fire of 1666, is only the most celebrated such failure. Plymouth, though, lived the dream. It rebuilt following a plan that was drawn up while the war that devastated its centre was still raging. “Out of the disasters of war,”
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Review: Bauschian Mortal Themes With a Light Touch30h Updated Review: Bauschian Mortal Themes With a Light Touch
Dimitris Papaionnou’s “The Great Tamer” has a comic tone that wards off pretension.
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‘I’m amazed to be in this company’: the winner of our graphic short story prize 201931h ‘I’m amazed to be in this company’: the winner of our graphic short story prize 2019
Picking the winner of the annual Cape/Observer/Comica award for emerging cartoonists was easy this year: Edo Brenes’s gentle tale, based on his Costa Rican grandparents’ lives, instantly won the judges’ hearts
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Echoes of Swing: Winter Days at Schloss Elmau review – delightful cold comfort31h Echoes of Swing: Winter Days at Schloss Elmau review – delightful cold comfort
(ACT) If you’re looking for a seasonal album with a touch of class,
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Le Mans ‘66 review – road race biopic fires on all cylinders32h Le Mans ‘66 review – road race biopic fires on all cylinders
Matt Damon and Christian Bale are on sparky form in this retelling of the Ford v Ferrari battle for racing dominance Slick, thrilling and saturated with vivid hues and 60s can-do optimism,
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Tate Britain show to reunite Aubrey Beardsley masterpieces33h Tate Britain show to reunite Aubrey Beardsley masterpieces
Exhibition will show the artist had a broader range than the simple black-and-white line drawings for which he is famousThe work of Aubrey Beardsley, master of the stylised ink line, is still popular on postcards and posters 120 years after his short life ended. But a
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3 Key Impeachment Developments This Week34h 3 Key Impeachment Developments This Week
2 days of public hearings. How did we get here? Allegations of bribery. And more.
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What George Eliot’s ‘provincial’ novels can teach today’s divided Britain36h What George Eliot’s ‘provincial’ novels can teach today’s divided Britain
Eliot fled the Midlands for London, only to ‘return’ in books that found the largest and most pressing themes in the smallest and most obscure lives In 1853 Marian Evans declared that she would rather kill herself than return to live in her native Warwickshire. For the past two years the 33-year-old Nuneaton native had been forging an independent life for herself in London. Working as assistant editor at the prestigious Westminster Review while lodging in the Strand, Evans now considered herself a paid-up member of the liberal metropolitan intellectual elite. No longer required to rub shoulders with small-time farmers and ribbon manufacturers, these days Miss Evans was more likely to be found discussing philosophy with Emerson, gossiping about Dickens and attending concerts with her almost-fiance, the sociologist Herbert Spencer. Now, though, Evans was being summoned “home” by her brother Isaac, the de facto head of the family. The young patriarch, who had inherited the family business from their late father, insisted that Marian make herself permanently available to their sister, Chrissie, newly widowed and struggling with too many children and not enough money. The prospect filled Evans with dread. “To live with [Chrissie] in that hideous neighbourhood amongst ignorant bigots is impossible to me,” she spluttered.
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They Love Trash36h They Love Trash
Young rebels take on the unpleasant byproducts of festival culture.
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Two Souls by Henry McDonald review – coming of age in the Troubles38h Two Souls by Henry McDonald review – coming of age in the Troubles
Growing up in 1970s Belfast means the thrill of punk and first love as well as the threat of violence In Northern Ireland, there are now many fine young and emerging writers whose attentions have turned away from the subject of the Troubles: the
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41h What’s on TV Saturday: ‘Dollface’ and Christmas Under the Stars’
A surrealist series about female friendship hits Hulu, and Jesse Metcalfe and Autumn Reeser star in a Hallmark holiday love story.
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