Back Arts Sunday, September 15, 2019
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‘Hustlers’ Has a Strong Opening at the Box Office40m Updated ‘Hustlers’ Has a Strong Opening at the Box Office
The movie opened to about $33.2 million in domestic ticket sales, second only to “It Chapter Two.”
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2h Updated After Toronto, Is Tarantino Still the Oscar Favorite?
A lot of major contenders just debuted at film festivals, but none may be strong enough to dislodge front-runner “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood.”
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3h Jojo Rabbit: Nazi satire wins top Toronto film award
Jojo Rabbit tells the story of a young boy in 1940s Germany whose mother is hiding a Jewish girl.
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A Light Safari in Wine Country3h Updated A Light Safari in Wine Country
Public light spectacles by artists like Bruce Munro herald a movement that infuses culture in valleys of viticulture (and blazes new trails in cities, too).
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Does Jennifer Lopez Have a Path to an Oscar for ‘Hustlers’?6h Updated Does Jennifer Lopez Have a Path to an Oscar for ‘Hustlers’?
The 50-year-old actress is earning career-best reviews for playing a stripper turned criminal mastermind. Can the role result in her first Oscar nomination?
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Kanye West’s New Yeezy Shoes Draw Comparisons to Crocs and a Colander6h Updated Kanye West’s New Yeezy Shoes Draw Comparisons to Crocs and a Colander
White, slip-on and dotted with holes, the unreleased shoes got decidedly mixed reviews after pictures of them emerged.
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Auction for Banksy artwork depicting MPs as chimpanzees7h Auction for Banksy artwork depicting MPs as chimpanzees
Devolved Parliament expected to sell for £1.5m-£2m, potentially becoming most expensive Banksy sold Banksy’s withering view of the UK parliament, showing a Commons chamber packed full of chimpanzees, is to appear at auction for what could be a record amount of money. The artist painted Devolved Parliament in 2009, when the word Brexit would have baffled people.
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The Week in Books9h Updated The Week in Books
Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey’s “She Said,” new memoirs from Demi Moore and Edward Snowden, “Super Tuesday” for publishing and more.
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A Single Thread by Tracy Chevalier review – hidden hurts and secret longings10h A Single Thread by Tracy Chevalier review – hidden hurts and secret longings
A thirtysomething spinster looks for purpose and companionship in a bittersweet evocation of Britain after the great warJust twice in Tracy Chevalier’s bittersweet new novel does its heroine, Violet Speedwell, think to herself: “I want to do that.” Her wishes are self-sacrificing enough: to embroider a kneeler in Winchester Cathedral and to ring its bells. Given that the year is 1932, the first is more easily realised than the second, yet both, in their way, are radical. Don’t be fooled by the ecclesiastical backdrop. For Violet, who lost first her fiance and then a brother to the trenches, God died in the great war. More than 16 years have since passed but only now, as a 38-year-old spinster, has she finally plucked up the nerve to leave behind her overbearing mother and their Southampton home and make a life of her own.
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A Big New Biography of Susan Sontag Digs to Find the Person Beneath the Icon13h A Big New Biography of Susan Sontag Digs to Find the Person Beneath the Icon
Benjamin Moser’s “Sontag” explores the life and work of the vaunted writer and public intellectual, including her long-term relationship with the photographer Annie Leibovitz.
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17h What’s on TV Sunday: Chelsea Handler and Roasting Alec Baldwin
Handler sets out to have tough conversations in “Hello, Privilege. It’s Me, Chelsea,” and Baldwin subjects himself to ridicule from Robert De Niro and Caitlyn Jenner.
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Anne Rivers Siddons, Novelist Whose Muse Was the New South, Dies at 8317h Updated Anne Rivers Siddons, Novelist Whose Muse Was the New South, Dies at 83
She found inspiration in her Georgia upbringing and in Atlanta’s evolution into a major postwar city.
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Jean Edward Smith, Biographer of the Underrated, Dies at 8618h Updated Jean Edward Smith, Biographer of the Underrated, Dies at 86
His books helped restore the reputations of Grant and Eisenhower and return John Marshall to the forefront of the American story.
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19h The festival letting fans follow in the footsteps of the Peaky Blinders
Thousands of flat cap-wearing fans take to the streets where the original Peaky Blinders once roamed.
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22h "Queer girl with a nose ring" rocks the Last Night of the Proms
Mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton steals the show at the Proms' Last Night, as Pride flags adorn the stage.
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‘A Cowboy Has to Sing’: Scenes From a Chuck Wagon Jamboree23h Updated ‘A Cowboy Has to Sing’: Scenes From a Chuck Wagon Jamboree
Every summer, western music bands and their fans get together to enjoy Roy Rogers songs, corny jokes, and roast beef and applesauce.
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After a Renovation, a Storied Theater Hopes to Entice Paris23h Updated After a Renovation, a Storied Theater Hopes to Entice Paris
The Théâtre du Châtelet is reopening after a two-and-a-half-year makeover, with a new artistic director and an inclusive new mission.
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29h Updated Robert Frank’s Legacy: Nine Photographers Reflect
We asked photographers to submit an example of their work that bears the imprint of Mr. Frank, who died on Monday, and discuss his influence on them.
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30h Updated Sam Smith changes pronouns to they/them
The singer makes the announcement after having been "at war with my gender" for a lifetime.
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Toronto film festival 2019: cinema’s lesser lights give the stars a run for their money32h Toronto film festival 2019: cinema’s lesser lights give the stars a run for their money
While Hollywood heavyweights like Tom Hanks and Renée Zellweger were out in force, some of the biggest treats were smaller titles Every film festival has its own personality, its own unique selling point. And, for Toronto, one of the main selling points is its audience. Eagerly egalitarian in outlook, TIFF (to give the festival its jaunty nickname) is all about the punters. Not for nothing are we reminded at every screening that the most important prize at the festival is the People’s Choice, voted for by the audience. Toronto screenings are famously warm and fuzzy. Unlike the fractious industry crowd at Cannes and Venice, the Toronto audience would sooner drop kittens from the top of the CN Tower than boo at a movie premiere. All of which makes for a uniquely upbeat experience for film-makers who choose to premiere films there. But it can make it harder to gauge the real potential of a film, to sort the buzz from the noise. The concept of a crowd-pleaser is slightly devalued when the crowd is pleased by pretty much everything.
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Hustlers review – pulse-racing empowerment32h Hustlers review – pulse-racing empowerment
A group of exotic dancers swindles Wall Street sleaze merchants in this riotous film based on a magazine article“This is a story about control,” purrs Janet Jackson on her 1986 empowerment anthem Control, which opens this riotous true tale. A resourceful girl gang of exotic dancers sets out to “fleece” New York’s sleaziest fat cats, drugging their drinks and running up their credit card bills in an act of feminist liberation from both men and The Man. The year is 2007 and top-tier scumbags are coming “straight from the crime scene to the club”, as Jennifer Lopez’s den mother, Ramona, puts it, suggesting that her own lawless behaviour is simply fair game. Based on, and faithful to, a 2015
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Antony Gormley: ‘In a digital age, sculpture is the antithesis to distraction’33h Antony Gormley: ‘In a digital age, sculpture is the antithesis to distraction’
The sculptor on using his own body in his work and the advantage of being married to a fellow artistBorn in London,
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Ones to watch: Say Sue Me33h Ones to watch: Say Sue Me
The four-piece South Korean pop band have lived through tragedy and bounced back with an edgy optimism A sun-slicked highlight of
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The week in classical: Festival of New; Shadwell Opera: Eight Songs for a Mad King; Proms – review35h The week in classical: Festival of New; Shadwell Opera: Eight Songs for a Mad King; Proms – review
Snape Maltings, Suffolk; Potemkin theatre, London; Cadogan Hall, London
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Sexy! No no no: Can Naked Attraction’s balls-out attitude be a force for good?36h Sexy! No no no: Can Naked Attraction’s balls-out attitude be a force for good?
Back for a fifth series, Channel 4’s late-night dating show is becoming more than just a naked novelty It is important to acknowledge that, in Naked Attraction (Wednesdays, 10pm, Channel 4), the producers have created a show designed to make me hold my palms bone-to-the-eyes and shout: “OH, JESUS GOD” whenever literally any second of action happens. Slow reveal of six ancient penises, stirring mutely like naked mole rats dropped on a barber’s shop floor? Oh, Jesus God. Host Anna Richardson turning sideface and saying: “Would you have a go on that?” like a Blue Peter presenter about to get stuck into some PVA glue? Oh, Jesus God. Three naked British people – naked! They have no clothes on! – sincerely praising each other’s bodies, standing there with the casual air of a half-forced smoking area chat, drily saying: “She has lovely boobs”? Oh, Jesus God. When I die I am going to hell, and when I go there I will be met by a file of nude people, every one of them sporting a crotch tattoo slightly overgrown with about four days’ worth of pubic hair, and I’ll have to stare them all in the eyes and go: “Yeah. It’s … interesting. I can see myself … I can definitely see myself going down there.” Every day for ever, until the abyss takes me.
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First novel at 12, gone at 25: the mystery of Barbara Newhall Follett36h First novel at 12, gone at 25: the mystery of Barbara Newhall Follett
When she published her debut The House Without Windows, Follett was hailed as a child genius. Then she disappeared … This is a tale of presence and absence. A mystery, a fantasy. It begins more than a century ago, on 4 March 1914, in a small house in Hanover, New Hampshire, when a child called Barbara Newhall Follett was born. Or perhaps it begins in 1918, when she was four? See in your mind’s eye a small girl standing silent outside the door of her father’s study. She can hear music. Curious taps and clicks and whirrs and tings of a small bell. She knows what she is hearing is the music of writing. And even at the age of four she understands how this music translates to words, how words gather to become stories, and she wants this with the clear sharp focus of a fierce four-year-old. So she waits, and later, when she hears her parents talking downstairs, their voices muffled by distance, she creeps back to her father’s study, wraps her arms around the object of her desire and carries the typewriter back to her room. Four years old. And now she is a writer.
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Onscreen in Toronto: Reasons for Hope at the Movies This Fall36h Updated Onscreen in Toronto: Reasons for Hope at the Movies This Fall
The dark and bright offerings at the Toronto International Film Festival eased our critic’s anxieties about the future of moviegoing.
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The stars of The Kitchen on on-screen equality37h The stars of The Kitchen on on-screen equality
Tiffany Haddish, Melissa McCarthy and Elisabeth Moss talk all-female casts, box-office hopes and Kool-Aid pickles Melissa McCarthy, Elisabeth Moss and Tiffany Haddish are kicking back in the Warner Bros commissary, discussing an American delicacy that, strangely, does not appear on the menu: “I taught them about pickles and Kool-Aid,” says Haddish proudly, as her two castmates erupt in squeals of revolted laughter. “That shows the true love I have for you,” says McCarthy. “Because I kept saying no and she kept saying: ‘You have to try it!’ I was like: ‘I. Don’t. Want. To. Do. This.’ And then the next thing I know, I was eating it and … ” Here, McCarthy, a Saturday Night Live regular and veteran of several blockbuster comedies, pauses before the punchline lands: “ … it was awful!”
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What’s on TV Saturday: ‘Unbelievable’ and ‘Maigret’37h What’s on TV Saturday: ‘Unbelievable’ and ‘Maigret’
Merritt Wever and Toni Collette hunt down a rapist in a new crime series on Netflix. And Rowan Atkinson plays Georges Simenon’s detective in “Maigret.”
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‘The Education of Brett Kavanaugh’ Takes a Hard Look at the Supreme Court Justice and His Accusers37h ‘The Education of Brett Kavanaugh’ Takes a Hard Look at the Supreme Court Justice and His Accusers
A new account by the New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly reinvestigates the allegations of sexual misconduct against the justice.
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As Westminster unravels, can I recommend losing yourself in the worst films of 2019? | Grace Dent38h As Westminster unravels, can I recommend losing yourself in the worst films of 2019? | Grace Dent
As everything becomes incendiary, all news confusing, all social media polarised, I have spent long periods in my local multiplex At the 11am screening of
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38h Eddie Money, Two Tickets to Paradise singer, dies at 70
The Two Tickets to Paradise singer, who sold some 30 million records, had been diagnosed with cancer.
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Permanent Record by Edward Snowden review – the whistleblower’s memoir39h Permanent Record by Edward Snowden review – the whistleblower’s memoir
The call of duty and a patriotic pedigree are given priority in Snowden’s account of his motivations – and he warns of dangers ahead
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